KURIGRAM, BANGLADESH-AUGUST 2008: Flood affected village men hack away the embankment left by the most recent flooding in the area where their village used to be, Kurigram, Northern Bangladesh, 2 August 2008. They are doing this on the orders of the local landowner who is using this earth for contruction in another area. These men are effectively further removing the only barrier between them and further flooding but desperately need the small amount they are paid so do the work anyway. The lack of a serious engineering works aimed at flood prevention in Bangladesh is behind the suffering of millions of impoverished rural people. Annual predicable floods bring misery to millions without any effective counter plan. A fatalistic nations chooses instead to move rather than try to combat the flooding through engineering ingenuity. Flooding, Poverty and lack of protected land ownership amongst the poor is driving a serious food crisis in Bangladesh. A male labourers makes around 90 US cents a day while a women makes around 50 US cents a day working in the fields. Extreme poverty and rising food prices couple with an oversupply of cheap labour has meant that many people can only afford to eat once a day. Many labourers sell their services up to a year ahead and have been caught out by rampant food prices which are beyond the reach of their wages. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. The price of food staples have doubled in the last 5 months and civil unrest is a possibility in the near future. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, and a loss of government subsidies for food staples combined with the world's highest flood plain has meant that many people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

DHAKA, BANGLADESH - JULY 2008: Images of poor slum dwellers in Dhaka, Bangladesh on 31 July 2008. Many slum dwelling mothers are malnourished due to rsing food prices and they pass on this condition through inadequate nutrients in breast milk. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, and a loss of government subsidies for food staples has meant that many people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

KURIGRAM, BANGLADESH-AUGUST 2008: The distribution of fortified Atta to Vulnerable Groups in Kurigram, Northern Bangladesh, 2 August 2008. These women and their families are victims of severe flooding and have lost access to food and earning power. 347 of these families qualify in this district for food aid but there are 8000 families in total. Severe flooding affect millions of people every year in Bangladesh which has the highest flood plain in the world. This creates the "Monga Period" a lean time which occurs every year in Bangladesh. Poverty and lack of land ownership amongst the poor is driving a serious food crisis in Bangladesh. A male labourers makes around 90 US cents a day while a women makes around 50 US cents a day working in the fields. Extreme poverty and rising food prices couple with an oversupply of cheap labour has meant that many people can only afford to eat once a day. Many labourers sell their services up to a year ahead and have been caught out by rampant food prices which are beyond the reach of their wages. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. The price of food staples have doubled in the last 5 months and civil unrest is a possibility in the near future. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, and a loss of government subsidies for food staples combined with the world's highest flood plain has meant that many people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

DHAKA, BANGLADESH - JULY 2008: Images of slum dwelling mothers who are struggling to provide sufficent nutrition for their babies in Dhaka, Bangladesh on 31 July 2008. Many slum dwelling mothers are malnourished due to rsing food prices and they pass on this condition through inadequate nutrients in breast milk. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, and a loss of government subsidies for food staples has meant that many people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

KURIGRAM, BANGLADESH-AUGUST 2008: The distribution of fortified Atta to Vulnerable Groups in Kurigram, Northern Bangladesh, 2 August 2008. These women and their families are victims of severe flooding and have lost access to food and earning power. 347 of these families qualify in this district for food aid but there are 8000 families in total. Severe flooding affect millions of people every year in Bangladesh which has the highest flood plain in the world. This creates the "Monga Period" a lean time which occurs every year in Bangladesh. Poverty and lack of land ownership amongst the poor is driving a serious food crisis in Bangladesh. A male labourers makes around 90 US cents a day while a women makes around 50 US cents a day working in the fields. Extreme poverty and rising food prices couple with an oversupply of cheap labour has meant that many people can only afford to eat once a day. Many labourers sell their services up to a year ahead and have been caught out by rampant food prices which are beyond the reach of their wages. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. The price of food staples have doubled in the last 5 months and civil unrest is a possibility in the near future. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, and a loss of government subsidies for food staples combined with the world's highest flood plain has meant that many people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

RANGPUR, NORTHERN BANGLADESH - JULY 2008: An impoverished farmer in rural Rangpur, Bangladesh on 2 August 2008. This farmer is a labourer on rice growing land. During his lunch break he takes a break from planting to try to catch small fish. These he sells in the market in the evening. This allows him to buy his family one full meal a day. A great deal of rural labour is sourced a year ahead by landowners. A small fee is agreed but because of the recent massive rise in food costs the very poor can no longer afford food on the agreed salaries. The price of rice has more than doubled in the last five months. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, a loss of government subsidies for food staples and subsequent price increases from merchant stockpiling has meant that many poor people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

KAZALDANGA, BANGLADESH-AUGUST 2008: Flood affected villagers eke out a living with the help of BRAC and WFP, Kazaldanga, Northern Bangladesh, 2 August 2008. Flooding, Poverty and lack of protected land ownership amongst the poor is driving a serious food crisis in Bangladesh. A male labourers makes around 90 US cents a day while a women makes around 50 US cents a day working in the fields. Extreme poverty and rising food prices couple with an oversupply of cheap labour has meant that many people can only afford to eat once a day. Many labourers sell their services up to a year ahead and have been caught out by rampant food prices which are beyond the reach of their wages. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. The price of food staples have doubled in the last 5 months and civil unrest is a possibility in the near future. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, and a loss of government subsidies for food staples combined with the world's highest flood plain has meant that many people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

GAIBANDAH, BANGLADESH-AUGUST 2008: Vulnerable farmers on flood damaged islands work to clear rice fields damaged by annual floods which destroy crops and homes amongst the poor on a yearly basis, Gaibandah, Bangladesh, 2 August 2008. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. The price of food staples have doubled in the last 5 months and civil unrest is a possibility in the near future. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, and a loss of government subsidies for food staples combined with the world's highest flood plain has meant that many people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

KURIGAM, BANGLADESH-AUGUST 2008: Children at school receive World Food Program biscuits containing 14 essential vitamins and minerals In Kurigam, Northern Bangladesh, 2 August 2008. As a result of dire poverty and rising food prices for many of these children this is often their only meal of the day. Over 17 tons of these biscuits are distributed daily in the district and over 400 tons are distributed monthly. As a result schood attendance is now at 99% as opposed to the previous 64%. The biscuit program has also seen less children involved in child labor programs as they can now be fed at school as opposed to having to earn their food through work. Poverty and lack of land ownership amongst the poor is driving a serious food crisis in Bangladesh. A male labourers makes around 90 US cents a day while a women makes around 50 US cents a day working in these fields. Extreme poverty and rising food prices couple with an oversupply of cheap labour has meant that many people can only afford to eat once a day. Many labourers sell their services up to a year ahead and have been caught out by rampant food prices which are beyond the reach of their wages. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. The price of food staples have doubled in the last 5 months and civil unrest is a possibility in the near future. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, and a loss of government subsidies for food staples combined with the world's highest flood plain has meant that many people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

KURIGAM, BANGLADESH-AUGUST 2008: Children at school receive World Food Program biscuits containing 14 essential vitamins and minerals In Kurigam, Northern Bangladesh, 2 August 2008. As a result of dire poverty and rising food prices for many of these children this is often their only meal of the day. Over 17 tons of these biscuits are distributed daily in the district and over 400 tons are distributed monthly. As a result schood attendance is now at 99% as opposed to the previous 64%. The biscuit program has also seen less children involved in child labor programs as they can now be fed at school as opposed to having to earn their food through work. Poverty and lack of land ownership amongst the poor is driving a serious food crisis in Bangladesh. A male labourers makes around 90 US cents a day while a women makes around 50 US cents a day working in these fields. Extreme poverty and rising food prices couple with an oversupply of cheap labour has meant that many people can only afford to eat once a day. Many labourers sell their services up to a year ahead and have been caught out by rampant food prices which are beyond the reach of their wages. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. The price of food staples have doubled in the last 5 months and civil unrest is a possibility in the near future. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, and a loss of government subsidies for food staples combined with the world's highest flood plain has meant that many people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

KURIGAM, BANGLADESH-AUGUST 2008: Children at school receive World Food Program biscuits containing 14 essential vitamins and minerals In Kurigam, Northern Bangladesh, 2 August 2008. As a result of dire poverty and rising food prices for many of these children this is often their only meal of the day. Over 17 tons of these biscuits are distributed daily in the district and over 400 tons are distributed monthly. As a result schood attendance is now at 99% as opposed to the previous 64%. The biscuit program has also seen less children involved in child labor programs as they can now be fed at school as opposed to having to earn their food through work. Poverty and lack of land ownership amongst the poor is driving a serious food crisis in Bangladesh. A male labourers makes around 90 US cents a day while a women makes around 50 US cents a day working in these fields. Extreme poverty and rising food prices couple with an oversupply of cheap labour has meant that many people can only afford to eat once a day. Many labourers sell their services up to a year ahead and have been caught out by rampant food prices which are beyond the reach of their wages. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. The price of food staples have doubled in the last 5 months and civil unrest is a possibility in the near future. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, and a loss of government subsidies for food staples combined with the world's highest flood plain has meant that many people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

KURIGAM, BANGLADESH-AUGUST 2008: Children at school receive World Food Program biscuits containing 14 essential vitamins and minerals In Kurigam, Northern Bangladesh, 2 August 2008. As a result of dire poverty and rising food prices for many of these children this is often their only meal of the day. Over 17 tons of these biscuits are distributed daily in the district and over 400 tons are distributed monthly. As a result schood attendance is now at 99% as opposed to the previous 64%. The biscuit program has also seen less children involved in child labor programs as they can now be fed at school as opposed to having to earn their food through work. Poverty and lack of land ownership amongst the poor is driving a serious food crisis in Bangladesh. A male labourers makes around 90 US cents a day while a women makes around 50 US cents a day working in these fields. Extreme poverty and rising food prices couple with an oversupply of cheap labour has meant that many people can only afford to eat once a day. Many labourers sell their services up to a year ahead and have been caught out by rampant food prices which are beyond the reach of their wages. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. The price of food staples have doubled in the last 5 months and civil unrest is a possibility in the near future. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, and a loss of government subsidies for food staples combined with the world's highest flood plain has meant that many people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

RANGPUR, NORTHERN BANGLADESH - JULY 2008: Labourers work in the testing fields planting and harvesting experimental rice varieties at the RDRS Hybrid Rice Growing Project in rural Rangpur, Bangladesh, 2 August 2008. This project has successfully developed a new strain of rice that can be grown inbetween the traditional periods where rice is grown. The rice can also be chopped off at the base and will then regrown unlike traditional strains which makes replanting unneccesary. It is also hardier and can grow in less perfect conditions than traditional rice. This RDRS Hybrid project makes the point that there is inadequate production for the population of Bangladesh and is attempting to address that. The price of rice has more than doubled in the last five months. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, a loss of government subsidies for food staples and subsequent price increases from merchant stockpiling has meant that many poor people are down to one meal a day. An additional crop a year would bring much needed relief as well as the possibility of moving beyond food security into a cash crop for many poor farmers. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

RANGPUR, NORTHERN BANGLADESH - JULY 2008: Labourers work in the testing fields planting and harvesting experimental rice varieties at the RDRS Hybrid Rice Growing Project in rural Rangpur, Bangladesh, 2 August 2008. This project has successfully developed a new strain of rice that can be grown inbetween the traditional periods where rice is grown. The rice can also be chopped off at the base and will then regrown unlike traditional strains which makes replanting unneccesary. It is also hardier and can grow in less perfect conditions than traditional rice. This RDRS Hybrid project makes the point that there is inadequate production for the population of Bangladesh and is attempting to address that. The price of rice has more than doubled in the last five months. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, a loss of government subsidies for food staples and subsequent price increases from merchant stockpiling has meant that many poor people are down to one meal a day. An additional crop a year would bring much needed relief as well as the possibility of moving beyond food security into a cash crop for many poor farmers. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

GAIBANDAH, BANGLADESH-AUGUST 2008: Laborers at work in Rice fields in Gaibandah, Northern Bangladesh, 2 August 2008. Poverty and lack of land ownership amongst the poor is driving a serious food crisis in Bangladesh. A male labourers makes around 90 US cents a day while a women makes around 50 US cents a day working in these fields. Extreme poverty and rising food prices couple with an oversupply of cheap labour has meant that many people can only afford to eat once a day. Many labourers sell their services up to a year ahead and have been caught out by rampant food prices which are beyond the reach of their wages. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. The price of food staples have doubled in the last 5 months and civil unrest is a possibility in the near future. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, and a loss of government subsidies for food staples combined with the world's highest flood plain has meant that many people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

RANGPUR, BANGLADESH-AUGUST 2008: An Atta production factory run by World Food Program in Rangpur, Northern Bangladesh, 2 August 2008. This food is distributed to vulnerable groups who are not able to support themselves and can no longer afford food. Flooding, Poverty and lack of protected land ownership amongst the poor is driving a serious food crisis in Bangladesh. A male labourer makes around 90 US cents a day while a women makes around 50 US cents a day working in the fields. Extreme poverty and rising food prices couple with an oversupply of cheap labour has meant that many people can only afford to eat once a day. Many labourers sell their services up to a year ahead and have been caught out by rampant food prices which are beyond the reach of their wages. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. The price of food staples have doubled in the last 5 months and civil unrest is a possibility in the near future. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, and a loss of government subsidies for food staples combined with the world's highest flood plain has meant that many people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

GAIBANDAH, BANGLADESH-AUGUST 2008: Vulnerable farmers work as day labourers for menial wages in rice fields near to Gaibandah, Northern Bangladesh, 2 August 2008. Poverty and lack of land ownership amongst the poor is driving a serious food crisis in Bangladesh. A male labourers makes around 90 US cents a day while a women makes around 50 US cents a day working in these fields. Extreme poverty and rising food prices couple with an oversupply of cheap labour has meant that many people can only afford to eat once a day. Many labourers sell their services up to a year ahead and have been caught out by rampant food prices which are beyond the reach of their wages. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. The price of food staples have doubled in the last 5 months and civil unrest is a possibility in the near future. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, and a loss of government subsidies for food staples combined with the world's highest flood plain has meant that many people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

GAIBANDAH, BANGLADESH-AUGUST 2008: Rice fields in Gaibandah, Northern Bangladesh, 2 August 2008. Poverty and lack of land ownership amongst the poor is driving a serious food crisis in Bangladesh. A male labourers makes around 90 US cents a day while a women makes around 50 US cents a day working in these fields. Extreme poverty and rising food prices couple with an oversupply of cheap labour has meant that many people can only afford to eat once a day. Many labourers sell their services up to a year ahead and have been caught out by rampant food prices which are beyond the reach of their wages. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. The price of food staples have doubled in the last 5 months and civil unrest is a possibility in the near future. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, and a loss of government subsidies for food staples combined with the world's highest flood plain has meant that many people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

GAIBANDAH, BANGLADESH-AUGUST 2008: Female labourers at work in Rice fields in Gaibandah, Northern Bangladesh, 2 August 2008. Poverty and lack of land ownership amongst the poor is driving a serious food crisis in Bangladesh. A male labourers makes around 90 US cents a day while a women makes around 50 US cents a day working in these fields. Extreme poverty and rising food prices couple with an oversupply of cheap labour has meant that many people can only afford to eat once a day. Many labourers sell their services up to a year ahead and have been caught out by rampant food prices which are beyond the reach of their wages. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. The price of food staples have doubled in the last 5 months and civil unrest is a possibility in the near future. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, and a loss of government subsidies for food staples combined with the world's highest flood plain has meant that many people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

GAIBANDAH, BANGLADESH-AUGUST 2008: Vulnerable farmers work as day labourers for menial wages in rice fields near to Gaibandah, Northern Bangladesh, 2 August 2008. Poverty and lack of land ownership amongst the poor is driving a serious food crisis in Bangladesh. A male labourers makes around 90 US cents a day while a women makes around 50 US cents a day working in these fields. Extreme poverty and rising food prices couple with an oversupply of cheap labour has meant that many people can only afford to eat once a day. Many labourers sell their services up to a year ahead and have been caught out by rampant food prices which are beyond the reach of their wages. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. The price of food staples have doubled in the last 5 months and civil unrest is a possibility in the near future. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, and a loss of government subsidies for food staples combined with the world's highest flood plain has meant that many people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

GAIBANDAH, BANGLADESH-AUGUST 2008: Vulnerable farmers work as day labourers for menial wages in rice fields near to Gaibandah, Northern Bangladesh, 2 August 2008. Poverty and lack of land ownership amongst the poor is driving a serious food crisis in Bangladesh. A male labourers makes around 90 US cents a day while a women makes around 50 US cents a day working in these fields. Extreme poverty and rising food prices couple with an oversupply of cheap labour has meant that many people can only afford to eat once a day. Many labourers sell their services up to a year ahead and have been caught out by rampant food prices which are beyond the reach of their wages. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. The price of food staples have doubled in the last 5 months and civil unrest is a possibility in the near future. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, and a loss of government subsidies for food staples combined with the world's highest flood plain has meant that many people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

DHAKA, BANGLADESH - JULY 2008: Food market scenes in Dhaka, Bangladesh on 31 July 2008. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, and a loss of government subsidies for food staples has meant that many people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

DHAKA, BANGLADESH - JULY 2008: Scenes from food markets in Dhaka, Bangladesh on 31 July 2008. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. Rising world energy prices, one of the worlds poorest populations, and a loss of government subsidies for food staples has meant that many people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

DHAKA, BANGLADESH - JULY 2008: Scenes from food markets in Dhaka, Bangladesh on 31 July 2008. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. Rising world energy prices, one of the worlds poorest populations, and a loss of government subsidies for food staples has meant that many people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

DHAKA, BANGLADESH - JULY 2008: A young Rickshaw Puller eats his single meal of the day in an impoverished slum area of Dhaka, Bangladesh on 31 July 2008. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, a loss of government subsidies for food staples and subsequent price increases from merchant stockpiling has meant that many poor people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

RANGPUR, BANGLADESH-AUGUST 2008: A seed and fertilizer dealer in Rangpur, Northern Bangladesh, 2 August 2008. It is hoped that hybrid techniques and fertilizers will help farmers to provide greater yielding crops in the face of a looming food crisis. Flooding, Poverty and lack of protected land ownership amongst the poor is driving a serious food crisis in Bangladesh. A male labourers makes around 90 US cents a day while a women makes around 50 US cents a day working in the fields. Extreme poverty and rising food prices couple with an oversupply of cheap labour has meant that many people can only afford to eat once a day. Many labourers sell their services up to a year ahead and have been caught out by rampant food prices which are beyond the reach of their wages. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. The price of food staples have doubled in the last 5 months and civil unrest is a possibility in the near future. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, and a loss of government subsidies for food staples combined with the world's highest flood plain has meant that many people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

DHAKA, BANGLADESH - JULY 2008: Scenes at a rice warehouse in Dhaka, Bangladesh on 31 July 2008. The young girls sweep up spilt rice all day and in exchange they are given a kilo and a half of rice to take home. In many cases these young children are responsible for the main family meal. Rice has tripled in price over the last year devastating poor families in Bangladesh. This is a result of food insecurity and resultant market speculation, natural disaster affecting crop yields, rising energy costs affecting food prices and the loss of a government subsidy for cheap staple foods for the poor. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. This has left many thousands of families surviving on one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

DHAKA, BANGLADESH - JULY 2008: Scenes at a rice warehouse in Dhaka, Bangladesh on 31 July 2008. The young girls sweep up spilt rice all day and in exchange they are given a kilo and a half of rice to take home. In many cases these young children are responsible for the main family meal. Rice has tripled in price over the last year devastating poor families in Bangladesh. This is a result of food insecurity and resultant market speculation, natural disaster affecting crop yields, rising energy costs affecting food prices and the loss of a government subsidy for cheap staple foods for the poor. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. This has left many thousands of families surviving on one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

DHAKA, BANGLADESH - JULY 2008: Panna Kalam,7, is the daughter of poor slum dwellers in Dhaka, Bangladesh on 31 July 2008. She spends her day searching through food markets for whatever scraps she can find on the floor and in the garbage. Her father is ill and her mother is busy with the other children. Panna and her scavenging is the only support for her family. Due to the huge rise in food prices they are more dependant on her than ever. Despite this, she remains a bouyant and optimistic little girl who undertakes her job with great pride. Many slum dwelling mothers are malnourished due to rsing food prices and they pass on this condition through inadequate nutrients in breast milk or being unable to feed their children properly. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, and a loss of government subsidies for food staples has meant that many people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

DHAKA, BANGLADESH - JULY 2008: Panna Kalam,7, is the daughter of poor slum dwellers in Dhaka, Bangladesh on 31 July 2008. She spends her day searching through food markets for whatever scraps she can find on the floor and in the garbage. Her father is ill and her mother is busy with the other children. Panna and her scavenging is the only support for her family. Due to the huge rise in food prices they are more dependant on her than ever. Despite this, she remains a bouyant and optimistic little girl who undertakes her job with great pride. Many slum dwelling mothers are malnourished due to rsing food prices and they pass on this condition through inadequate nutrients in breast milk or being unable to feed their children properly. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, and a loss of government subsidies for food staples has meant that many people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

DHAKA, BANGLADESH - JULY 2008: Panna Kalam,7, is the daughter of poor slum dwellers in Dhaka, Bangladesh on 31 July 2008. She spends her day searching through food markets for whatever scraps she can find on the floor and in the garbage. Her father is ill and her mother is busy with the other children. Panna and her scavenging is the only support for her family. Due to the huge rise in food prices they are more dependant on her than ever. Despite this, she remains a bouyant and optimistic little girl who undertakes her job with great pride. Many slum dwelling mothers are malnourished due to rsing food prices and they pass on this condition through inadequate nutrients in breast milk or being unable to feed their children properly. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, and a loss of government subsidies for food staples has meant that many people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

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RIFT VALLEY PROVINCE, KENYA, NOVEMBER 2009: Images of a massacre site where the Pokot tribesman came out of the Rift Valley, their traditional area, and attacked a Samburu village over cattle grazing rights in the north of Kenya at a time of the worst drought in the region for the last 100 years, 20 November 2009. 25 Samburu men, women and children were killed in the attack, over 50 cattle were shot and over 300 died later in the week from not being able to access grazing land because of the threat of the Pokot. The drought has brought about increasingly deadly conflict between pastoralists as well as conservationists all competing for grazing land. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage by Getty Images.)

RIFT VALLEY PROVINCE, KENYA, NOVEMBER 2009: Samburu pastoralists drain blood to mix with milk from an emaciated cow in Samburu National Park in the north of Kenya at a time of the worst drought in Kenya for the last 100 years, 20 November 2009. These cattle are the last remaining of a herd of 300 which have succumbed to the worst drought to hit Kenya in over 100 years. Many Samburu now face starvation as a result of their decimated herds being unable to supply a steady food supply for communities. Tensions are high as pastoralists tribes as well as conservationists are all competing for tiny pockets of grazing land. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage by Getty Images.)

KOYA, MARSABIT SOUTH, NORTH KENYA: Rendille Morans dig water for goats and camels in an area designated as sustainable by the Melako Conservancy comittee, Koya, North Kenya, 28 February 2010. The Melako Conservancy is run by the local community with advice from the Northern Rangeland Trust, an NGO which seeks to advise communities on sustainable pastoral practises and ways to leverage wildlife for conservancy and income purposes. In this area they have been instrumental in advising the locals how to graze cattle sustainably in a controlled pattern and keep them out of sensitive wildlife areas so that they can build viable tourism from which the community derives an annual guaranteed income. (Photo by Brent Stirton/ Reportage by Getty Images.)

CAMEROON, JULY 2010: Local people with bushmeat sold and purchased all along the logging roads of Cameroon, this is not an illegal activity at this time but as logging creates roads and towns the pressure on bushmeat is rapidly becoming unsustainable and unless controlled may lead to the rapid eradication of most forest creatures, Cameroon, June 6, 2010. The Congo Basin forests cover an area the combined size of France and South Africa. The forests of Cameroon form a large part of this basin. Still relatively intact and connected, these forest ecosystems and freshwater systems are home to abundant wildlife and provide food, shelter, clean water and protection against floods to more than 75 million people. The economic value of these systems is enormous. Timber alone is worth several Billion Euros annually to the Forest industry, while minerals are also being heavily exploited. The importance of the Congo Basin as a global, natural reservoir to store Carbon is also massive. CO2 emissions from deforestation of this region could be devastating for agriculture and water resources. The challenges for Cameroon are enormous. If social and economic development needs are to be met, then development will have to be sustainable. As such a number of key threats will have to be addressed: 1. Unsustainable Timber exploitation – as much 50% of all timber from the region is believed to be illegal. This represents 10-15 billion Euros annually.2. Major Infrastructure Development – this is linked to the increasing exploitation of logging, mining and oil exploration as well as potential dam building. 3. Unsustainable levels of bush meat hunting – population increase, bush roads, trucking to and from remote areas all lead to increased food pressures.4. Growing human Populations – increased cultivation of food within forests.5. Weak governance and rule of law – corruption and inequitable division of profits derived from the forests. The answers: 1. Sustainable Forest managemen

NYABISSAM, CAMEROON, JULY 2011: A woman prepares a porcupine for the pot in a small Cameroonian village close to to Nyabissam, July 27, 2011. This woman risks the transmission of animal disease pathogens to her own body during the bloody preparation process. Any cuts on her hands or arms could see a transmission of disease from the animal to her, a fact that many consumers of bushmeat are unaware. Dr Nathan D. Wolfe, an American virologist who is the Director of the Global Viral Forecasting Initiative and the Lorry I. Lokey Visiting Professor in Human Biology at Stanford University. Dr. Wolfe spent over eight years conducting biomedical research in both sub-Saharan Africa and Southeast Asia. In 2007, he founded the Global Viral Forecasting Initiative with the goal of developing an early warning system for pandemics to monitor the transmission of infectious diseases from animals to humans. The initiative currently coordinates a staff of over 100 scientists in China, Cameroon, Equatorial Guinea, DR Congo, PR Congo, Lao, Gabon, Central African Republic, Malaysia, Madagascar and Sao Tome. He also directs Global Viral Forecasting Inc. which offers both governmental and corporate services for biological threat evaluation and management. He works with local hunters in the forests of Cameroon. Wolfe has a long history with these small animal hunters with whom he collaborates in obtaining vital blood samples to monitor emerging Pathogens which may be harmful to both humans and wildlife. Small mammals can be reservoirs for new and emerging infectious diseases. The most famous example of this is the the HIV Virus which emerged from Chimp DNA which combined with that of the monkeys the Chimps ate. Blood to blood contact between Chimps hunted for food and human's who becames infected through contact with infected chimps. Wolfe's mission is to guard the frontline of infectious disease, searching for the next pandemic, serving the frontline in the war against the next super-virus.

LAKE TURKANA, NORTHERN KENYA, MAY 2010: Dasenetch pastoralist people with their catch of Tilapia fish in Lake Turkana in North Kenya, 20 May 2010. Fishing is a relatively new phenomenon for the Dasenetch, drought and climate change have forced them to look further than cattle for alternative sources of sustenance and economy. Fishing has become the primary means in the Lake Turkana region but has yet to reach any real commercial significance. The lake is the largest desert lake in the world and sustains both Turkana and Dasenetch people as well as Gabra and other tribes in the region. Lake Turkana faces an uncertain future however as the Gibe 3 dam project in Ethiopia, a massive hydro-electric scheme and Ethiopia's biggest single investment, comes on line. The dam project, designed to create electricity for sale to surrounding countries including Kenya, will reduce the flow of the Omo river dramatically and this river is the main feeder river for Lake Turkana. Significant changes in lake levels and in ecology can be expected as a result. Fertile flood plain invaluable for agriculture will also be negatively impacted. All of this bodes badly for the pastoralists of the Lake Turkana and Southern Ethiopia's Omo river region, these groups are already under severe subsistence pressure and there is a long history of armed conflict in the region. Weapons flow in to this region through Sudan and Somalia and there is little control over this trade which looks likely to accelerate if pressures increase in this region. At this time the Dam project has full support from Kenya's Nairobi government, despite the fact that there has been no Environmental Impact Asssesment produced for this scheme. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage by Getty Images.)

BUNGOMA, KENYA - 13 SEPTEMBER: Images of Dominion Farm, the largest private American investment in Kenya, September 13, 2007 in Bungoma, Kenya. The farm's owners are staunch Christians but unlike most evangelical movements who come to Africa they do not wish to provide traditional aid, they wish to uplift the people via good sustainable realistic business sense. The farm specialises in massive Fish breeding and massive Rice production and has resisted protest and corruption on their way to success. They believe in the business potential of Africa and Africans and express disapointment at the lack of American business investment in Africa. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

KISUMU, KENYA - 10 SEPTEMBER: Images of a subsidised bee-keeper at work in the Sauri Millenium village, September 10, 2007 in Kisumu, Kenya. The pictures illustrate succesful production based on five years of initial structured financing of rural communities which allows small farmers to reach sustainability and the ability to support themselves. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

BUNGOMA, KENYA - 11 SEPTEMBER: Images of trials for maize growing with different varieties of seed, September 11, 2007 in Bungoma, Kenya. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

Nairobi, Kenya - 9 September: Akinwumi Adesina, associate director of Food Security for the Rockefeller Foundation and winner of the Yara Prize 2007, a major award for his role in advancing the African green revolution, September 9, 2007 in Nairobi, Kenya. Adesina evolved a system for implementing vastly more efficent farming methods and access to fertilisers for African nations.(Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

BUNGOMA, KENYA - 11 SEPTEMBER: Images of students and teachers at Sacred Africa agricultural college, September 11, 2007 in Bungoma, Kenya. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

KISUMU, KENYA - 10 SEPTEMBER: Images of a female agro-dealer in the market places of the Sauri Millenium village, September 10, 2007 in Kisumu, Kenya. The pictures illustrate succesful production based on five years of initial structured financing of rural communities which allows small farmers to reach sustainability and the ability to support themselves. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

BUNGOMA, KENYA - 11 SEPTEMBER: Images at KACE market information point where local farmers can use information and cell phones to stay informed on market prices throughout the region, September 11, 2007 in Bungoma, Kenya. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

BUNGOMA, KENYA - 11 SEPTEMBER: Images of SACRED cereal bank and co-operative members at work, September 11, 2008 in Bungoma, Kenya. These cereal banks function as security for many of the farmers in this region. The corn is stored as capital which allows them to pay for thing s like medicine and education for their children and also to aquire micro-loans for business expansion.(Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

TABORA, TANZANIA, AUGUST 2007: Succesful crop harvesting in Tabora, Tanzania, 27 August 2008. Small financing and agricultural education from WWF and the Millenium Village foundation have subsequently enabled farmers in this part of Tanzania to develop land for crop production far more efficently than before thereby guaranteeing food security and a better life for local people. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage by Getty Images.)

KISUMU, KENYA - 11 SEPTEMBER: The secretary of a local newly- formed farmer's group in the Sauri Millenium village locale, September 11, 2007 in Kisumu, Kenya. He stands with his maize crop which will soon be pooled with the other farmers as they seek to reinforce each others efforts. The Millenium Village concept is based on succesful production based on five years of initial structured financing of rural communities which allows small farmers to reach sustainability and the ability to support themselves. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

KISUMU, KENYA - 11 SEPTEMBER: A young mother and her child prepare lunch in their small hut in the Sauri Millenium village locale, September 11, 2007 in Kisumu, Kenya. The Millenium Village concept is based on succesful production based on five years of initial structured financing of rural communities which allows small farmers to reach sustainability and the ability to support themselves. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

KISUMU, KENYA - 11 SEPTEMBER: A rural woman and her children prepare for bed underneath donated repellent-impregnated mosqito netting in the Sauri Millenium village locale, September 11, 2007 in Kisumu, Kenya. Malaria rates in the area have dropped by over 400% as a result of the donated netting, freeing farmers of disease and making for a more productive populace. The Millenium Village concept is based on succesful production based on five years of initial structured financing of rural communities which allows small farmers to reach sustainability and the ability to support themselves. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

BUNGOMA, KENYA - 13 SEPTEMBER: Images of HoneyCare projects for receiving, manufacturing, processing and delivery of honey by rural farmers, September 11, 2007 in Bungoma, Kenya. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

KISUMU, KENYA - 10 SEPTEMBER: Images of diverse agricultural production and farming in the Sauri Millenium village, September 10, 2007 in Kisumu, Kenya. The pictures illustrate succesful production based on five years of initial structured financing of rural communities which allows small farmers to reach sustainability and the ability to support themselves. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

TABORA, TANZANIA, AUGUST 2007: A Tanzanian woman runs a small business selling small food parcels which she buys in bulk at a Millenium Village sponsored village in Tabora, Tanzania, 27 August 2008. Small financing and agricultural education from WWF and the Millenium Village foundation have subsequently enabled farmers in this part of Tanzania to develop land for crop production far more efficently than before thereby guaranteeing food security and a better life for local people. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage by Getty Images.)

BUNGOMA, KENYA - 13 SEPTEMBER: Images of HoneyCare projects for receiving, manufacturing, processing and delivery of honey by rural farmers, September 11, 2007 in Bungoma, Kenya. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

ORNGAYANET, NAROK SOUTH, KENYA, FEBRUARY 2010: Pastoralist Masaai prepare a field of Maize in Orngayanet, Kenya, 22 February, 2010. Crop cultivation is a relatively new thing for the Masaai, and is a result of living next to other tribes who practise agricultural and have fared better than the Masaai with their cattle in times of drought and disease and shrinking grazing land. There are now large fields of maize under cultivation by the Masaai as some move from pastoralism towards a more stable means of income and subsistence. The main priorities of the Pastorilists around Kenya is access to medical treatment, education for their children and access to water for good grazing. The culture around cattle however means that selling them for money for these purposes is often a reluctant process. As land for grazing diminishes and drough and climate change and overpopulation loom, these practises will have to change if pastoralists are to move into a modern way of life. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage by Getty Images.)

KISUMU, KENYA - 10 SEPTEMBER: Images of diverse agricultural production and farming in the Sauri Millenium village, September 10, 2007 in Kisumu, Kenya. The pictures illustrate succesful production based on five years of initial structured financing of rural communities which allows small farmers to reach sustainability and the ability to support themselves. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

TABORA, TANZANIA, AUGUST 2007: Succesful crop harvesting in Tabora, Tanzania, 27 August 2008. Small financing and agricultural education from WWF and the Millenium Village foundation have subsequently enabled farmers in this part of Tanzania to develop land for crop production far more efficently than before thereby guaranteeing food security and a better life for local people. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage by Getty Images.)

TABORA, TANZANIA, AUGUST 2007: Succesful crop harvesting in Tabora, Tanzania, 27 August 2008. Small financing and agricultural education from WWF and the Millenium Village foundation have subsequently enabled farmers in this part of Tanzania to develop land for crop production far more efficently than before thereby guaranteeing food security and a better life for local people. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage by Getty Images.)

KISUMU, KENYA - 10 SEPTEMBER: Images of diverse agricultural production and farming in the Sauri Millenium village, September 10, 2007 in Kisumu, Kenya. The pictures illustrate succesful production based on five years of initial structured financing of rural communities which allows small farmers to reach sustainability and the ability to support themselves. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

NAIROBI, KENYA - 13 SEPTEMBER: Images of Promisador/Nutro grain and maize facility, September 13, 2007 in Nairobi, Kenya. This surplus will be shipped all over Africa for food aid and is possible because of new techniques in food production brought about by the Millenium Village concept of subsidy and education leading to self sustaing local enterprise. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

BUNGOMA, KENYA - 13 SEPTEMBER: Images of rice production in the factory on Dominion Farm, the largest private American investment in Kenya, September 13, 2007 in Bungoma, Kenya. The farm's owners are staunch Christians but unlike most evangelical movements who come to Africa they do not wish to provide traditional aid, they wish to uplift the people via good sustainable realistic business sense. The farm specialises in massive Fish breeding and massive Rice production and has resisted protest and corruption on their way to success. They believe in the business potential of Africa and Africans and express disapointment at the lack of American business investment in Africa. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

KISUMU, KENYA - 11 SEPTEMBER: Scenes from the Yara Market for local produce and goods in the Sauri Millenium village locale, September 11, 2007 in Kisumu, Kenya. The Millenium Village concept is based on succesful production based on five years of initial structured financing of rural communities which allows small farmers to reach sustainability and the ability to support themselves. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

KISUMU, KENYA - 13 SEPTEMBER: Images of local agricultural produce at the Jubilee market, September 13, 2007 in Kisumu, Kenya. The market is a new facility financed in conjunction with various NGO's. It provides a retail outlet for the farmers of the Millenium Village project who have benefitted from a short term loan subsidy and agricultural education. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

KISUMU, KENYA - 11 SEPTEMBER: Scenes from the Yara Market for local produce and goods in the Sauri Millenium village locale, September 11, 2007 in Kisumu, Kenya. The Millenium Village concept is based on succesful production based on five years of initial structured financing of rural communities which allows small farmers to reach sustainability and the ability to support themselves. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

NAIROBI, KENYA - 13 SEPTEMBER: Images of export packaging at the "Fresh and Juicy" warehouse facility, where organic produce from rural farmers supported by the Millenium Village project, is readied for export, September 13, 2007, Nairobi, Kenya. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

ZOMBA, MALAWI-JULY 2008: A poor farmer mixes home-made manure which has trebled his crop yield over the last 3 years, Zomba, Malawi, 17 July 2008. His cabbage fields and maize crop have allowed him to pay school fees for his children and build a new house. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

KASUNGO, MALAWI-JULY 2008: A rural village has taken its food security a step further by building a dam for rainwater and then using footpumps and watering cans to get the water to fields to grow maize, Kasungo, Malawi, 14 July 2008. (photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

KASUNGO, MALAWI-JULY 2008: A rural village has taken its food security a step further by building a dam for rainwater and then using footpumps and watering cans to get the water to fields to grow maize, Kasungo, Malawi, 14 July 2008. (photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

ZOMBA, MALAWI-JULY 2007: Patrick Khovima, 33, a poor farmer, has built a field irrigation system from a simple trench and plastic which he uses a leg pump to irrigate. He has trebled his crop yield over the last year as a result, Zomba, Malawi, 17 July 2007. He has built a better house, bught a sofa and tv and is saving for iron sheeting for the roof of his house. These techniques have allowed Malawi to turn around an agricultural nightmare into the biggest success in the region in only a 3 year period. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

ZOMBA, MALAWI-JULY 2008: A poor farmer's co-operative has built a field irrigation system from a simple trench and plastic which has trebled their crop yield over the last 3 years, Zomba, Malawi, 17 July 2008. New techniques with UNDP/Millenium Village expertise have allowed Malawi to turn around an agricultural nightmare into the biggest success in the region in only a 3 year period. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

ZOMBA, MALAWI-JULY 2007: Agricultural supply stores in Zomba, Malawi, 17 July 2007. Many farmers in Malawi credit their recent success to hybrid seeds and fertilizers which have in many cases more than doubled their crops and enabled them to produce a winter crop as well. (photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

ZOMBA, MALAWI-JULY 2008: A poor farmer holds home-made manure which has trebled his crop yield over the last 3 years, Zomba, Malawi, 17 July 2008. (photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

MZIMBA, MALAWI-JULY 2008: A farming community harvests corn in Mzimba, Malawi, 17 July 2008. This is a bumper year for Malawian farmers. Many farmers in Malawi credit their recent success to progessive agriculture which includes hybrid seeds and fertilizers which have in many cases more than doubled their crops and enabled them to produce a winter crop as well. This has enabled many farmers to escape food insecurity, build their own homes, buy bicycles and send their children to school with schoolfees. (photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

MZIMBA, MALAWI-JULY 2008: A farming community harvests corn in Mzimba, Malawi, 17 July 2008. This is a bumper year for Malawian farmers. Many farmers in Malawi credit their recent success to progessive agriculture which includes hybrid seeds and fertilizers which have in many cases more than doubled their crops and enabled them to produce a winter crop as well. This has enabled many farmers to escape food insecurity, build their own homes, buy bicycles and send their children to school with schoolfees. (photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

MZIMBA, MALAWI-JULY 2008: A farming community harvests corn in Mzimba, Malawi, 17 July 2008. This is a bumper year for Malawian farmers. Many farmers in Malawi credit their recent success to progessive agriculture which includes hybrid seeds and fertilizers which have in many cases more than doubled their crops and enabled them to produce a winter crop as well. This has enabled many farmers to escape food insecurity, build their own homes, buy bicycles and send their children to school with schoolfees. (photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

MZIMBA, MALAWI-JULY 2008: A farming community harvests corn in Mzimba, Malawi, 17 July 2008. This is a bumper year for Malawian farmers. Many farmers in Malawi credit their recent success to progessive agriculture which includes hybrid seeds and fertilizers which have in many cases more than doubled their crops and enabled them to produce a winter crop as well. This has enabled many farmers to escape food insecurity, build their own homes, buy bicycles and send their children to school with schoolfees. (photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

MZIMBA, MALAWI-JULY 2008: A Malawian farming family harvests corn in rural Mzimba, Malawi, 17 July 2008. This is a bumper year for Malawian farmers. Many farmers in Malawi credit their recent success to progessive agriculture which includes hybrid seeds and fertilizers which have in many cases more than doubled their crops and enabled them to produce a winter crop as well. This has enabled many farmers to escape food insecurity, build their own homes, buy bicycles and send their children to school with schoolfees. (photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

ZOMBA, MALAWI-JULY 2007: Grain Bank storage with new elevated storage techniques at the Millenium Village facility in Zomba, Malawi, 17 July 2007. This grain bank stores at least 3 bags for each family in the scheme, in many cases far more. This provides financial security for families and also allows a financial system to develop which will make the farmers independant of aid. Many farmers in Malawi credit their recent success to hybrid seeds and fertilizers which have in many cases more than doubled their crops and enabled them to produce a winter crop as well. (photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

MZIMBA, MALAWI-JULY 2008: A Malawian farmer stands in a rural field of sweet potatoes in Mzimba, Malawi, 17 July 2008. This is a bumper year for Malawian farmers and the sweet potatoes are a cash crop, maize is plentiful and this food security allows farmers to grow cash crops such as sweet potato. Many farmers in Malawi credit their recent success to progessive agriculture which includes hybrid seeds and fertilizers which have in many cases more than doubled their crops and enabled them to produce a winter crop as well. This has enabled many farmers to escape food insecurity, build their own homes, buy bicycles and send their children to school with school fees. (photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

ZOMBA, MALAWI-JULY 2008: Alex Kampuku with his goats and his daughter Jdesi, Zomba, Malawi, 17 July 2008. To assist impoverished farmers the Millenium Project gives two goats to people who could never afford to buy them, after the goats have mated a few times, the farmers then pass on a breeding pair to another impoverished farmer. This provides an income and also a source of animal protein for farmer's diets. (photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

BUNGOMA, KENYA - 13 SEPTEMBER: Images of a poor, rural, outdoor school for young children, September 11, 2007 in Bungoma, Kenya. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

RURAL KAMPALA, UGANDA - 13 SEPTEMBER: Images of a rural school for young children outside Kampala, Uganda, 1 October 2008. Rural people polled in this area and in most of rural Africa have consistently said that their number one priority once food security is acheived is to be able to educate and uplift their children. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

LILONGWE, MALAWI-JULY 2008: Scenes from the Kanengo Silo storage and packaging facility in the capital Lilongwe, Malawi, 14 July 2008. Malawi has made a remarkable turnaround in its agricultural production in the last two years, going from a nation facing starvation to using new methods of cultivation to become the biggest producer in the region. (photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

LILONGWE, MALAWI-JULY 2008: Scenes from the Kanengo Silo storage and packaging facility in the capital Lilongwe, Malawi, 14 July 2008. Malawi has made a remarkable turnaround in its agricultural production in the last two years, going from a nation facing starvation to using new methods of cultivation to become the biggest producer in the region. (photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

LILONGWE, MALAWI-JULY 2008: Scenes from the Kanengo Silo storage and packaging facility in the capital Lilongwe, Malawi, 14 July 2008. Malawi has made a remarkable turnaround in its agricultural production in the last two years, going from a nation facing starvation to using new methods of cultivation to become the biggest producer in the region. (photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

LILONGWE, MALAWI-JULY 2008: Scenes from the Kanengo Silo storage and packaging facility in the capital Lilongwe, Malawi, 14 July 2008. Malawi has made a remarkable turnaround in its agricultural production in the last two years, going from a nation facing starvation to using new methods of cultivation to become the biggest producer in the region. (photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

KASUNGO, MALAWI-JULY 2008: A therapeutic feeding centre for malnourished children run by World Food Program in Kasungo, Malawi, 14 July 2008. (photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

ST LOUIS, MISSOURI, MAY 2009: Images of Monsanto agribusiness greenhouses on top of a research building in St Louis, Missouri, 21 May 2009. Monsanto is at the forefront of biotechnology in the agribusiness sector and these greenhouses are housing the corn, soy bean and cotton of the future. All the plants in the Greenhouses have been carefully selected and cross-bred for their elite DNA qualities and are being grown as the crop of the future. It is estimated that these plants will produce seeds which are likely to see actual agricultural production in five to eight years time. (Photograph by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

ST LOUIS, MISSOURI, MAY 2009: Images of advanced seed chipping machines and their technicans inside Monsanto agribusiness headquarters in St Louis, Missouri, 21 May 2009. Monsanto is at the forefront of biotechnology in the agribusiness sector. These machines are designed and built inhouse and they allow the technicans to chip off a tiny portion of thousands of seeds daily. These chips are scanned instantly for the perfect DNA of an elite corn seed and then those seeds that make the grade are forwarded to the next stage of the selection process. Monsanto is a controversial global corporate with a history of strong litigation against those it assumes are interfering with its stringent patent laws. This practise as well as its advanced genetically modified technology approach in the agricultural sector have led many to be suspicious of Monsanto and the ultimate good of GM foods. Monsanto argues back that sufficent food production for the future is simply not possible without adequate GM technology in agriculture. (Photograph by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

ST LOUIS, MISSOURI, MAY 2009: Research Biologist Heidi Windler takes tissue samples from genetically modified corn plants inside a climate chamber housed in Monsanto agribusiness headquarters in St Louis, Missouri, 21 May 2009. Windler is attempting to breed a Corn Root Worm resistant strain of corn which will one day form the basis of a root worm resistant corn crop of the future. Monsanto is at the forefront of biotechnology in the agribusiness sector. These climate chambers are designed and built inhouse and they allow the technicans to monitor plant growth daily. These plants are monitored for the perfect DNA of an elite corn seed and then those plants that make the grade are forwarded to the next stage of the selection process. Monsanto is a controversial global corporate with a history of strong litigation against those it assumes are interfering with its stringent patent laws. This practise as well as its advanced genetically modified technology approach in the agricultural sector have led many to be suspicious of Monsanto and the ultimate good of GM foods. Monsanto argues back that sufficent food production for the future is simply not possible without adequate GM technology in agriculture. (Photograph by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

ST LOUIS, MISSOURI, MAY 2009: Plant Specialist Dustin McMahon hand pollinates genetically modified corn plants inside greenhouses housed on the roof of Monsanto agribusiness headquarters in St Louis, Missouri, 21 May 2009. McMahon is attempting to breed a resistant strain of corn which will one day form the basis of an elite corn crop of the future. Monsanto is at the forefront of biotechnology in the agribusiness sector. These greenhouses are designed and built inhouse and they allow the technicans to monitor plant growth daily. These plants are monitored for the perfect DNA of an elite corn seed and then those plants that make the grade are forwarded to the next stage of the selection process. Monsanto is a controversial global corporate with a history of strong litigation against those it assumes are interfering with its stringent patent laws. This practise as well as its advanced genetically modified technology approach in the agricultural sector have led many to be suspicious of Monsanto and the ultimate good of GM foods. Monsanto argues back that sufficent food production for the future is simply not possible without adequate GM technology in agriculture. (Photograph by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

 KURIGRAM, BANGLADESH-AUGUST 2008: Flood affected village men hack away the embankment left by the most recent flooding in the area where their village used to be, Kurigram, Northern Bangladesh, 2 August 2008. They are doing this on the orders of the local landowner who is using this earth for contruction in another area. These men are effectively further removing the only barrier between them and further flooding but desperately need the small amount they are paid so do the work anyway. The lack of a serious engineering works aimed at flood prevention in Bangladesh is behind the suffering of millions of impoverished rural people. Annual predicable floods bring misery to millions without any effective counter plan. A fatalistic nations chooses instead to move rather than try to combat the flooding through engineering ingenuity. Flooding, Poverty and lack of protected land ownership amongst the poor is driving a serious food crisis in Bangladesh. A male labourers makes around 90 US cents a day while a women makes around 50 US cents a day working in the fields. Extreme poverty and rising food prices couple with an oversupply of cheap labour has meant that many people can only afford to eat once a day.  Many labourers sell their services up to a year ahead and have been caught out by rampant food prices which are beyond the reach of their wages. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. The price of food staples have doubled in the last 5 months and civil unrest is a possibility in the near future. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, and a loss of government subsidies for food staples combined with the world's highest flood plain has meant that many people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
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 DHAKA, BANGLADESH - JULY 2008: Images of poor slum dwellers in Dhaka, Bangladesh on 31 July 2008. Many slum dwelling mothers are malnourished due to rsing food prices and they pass on this condition through inadequate nutrients in breast milk. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, and a loss of government subsidies for food staples has meant that many people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 KURIGRAM, BANGLADESH-AUGUST 2008: The distribution of fortified Atta to Vulnerable Groups in Kurigram, Northern Bangladesh, 2 August 2008. These women and their families are victims of severe flooding and have lost access to food and earning power. 347 of these families qualify in this district for food aid but there are 8000 families in total. Severe flooding affect millions of people every year in Bangladesh which has the highest flood plain in the world. This creates the "Monga Period" a lean time which occurs every year in Bangladesh. Poverty and lack of land ownership amongst the poor is driving a serious food crisis in Bangladesh. A male labourers makes around 90 US cents a day while a women makes around 50 US cents a day working in the fields. Extreme poverty and rising food prices couple with an oversupply of cheap labour has meant that many people can only afford to eat once a day. Many labourers sell their services up to a year ahead and have been caught out by rampant food prices which are beyond the reach of their wages. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. The price of food staples have doubled in the last 5 months and civil unrest is a possibility in the near future. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, and a loss of government subsidies for food staples combined with the world's highest flood plain has meant that many people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
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 DHAKA, BANGLADESH - JULY 2008: Images of slum dwelling mothers who are struggling to provide sufficent nutrition for their babies in Dhaka, Bangladesh on 31 July 2008. Many slum dwelling mothers are malnourished due to rsing food prices and they pass on this condition through inadequate nutrients in breast milk. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, and a loss of government subsidies for food staples has meant that many people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 KURIGRAM, BANGLADESH-AUGUST 2008: The distribution of fortified Atta to Vulnerable Groups in Kurigram, Northern Bangladesh, 2 August 2008. These women and their families are victims of severe flooding and have lost access to food and earning power. 347 of these families qualify in this district for food aid but there are 8000 families in total. Severe flooding affect millions of people every year in Bangladesh which has the highest flood plain in the world. This creates the "Monga Period" a lean time which occurs every year in Bangladesh. Poverty and lack of land ownership amongst the poor is driving a serious food crisis in Bangladesh. A male labourers makes around 90 US cents a day while a women makes around 50 US cents a day working in the fields. Extreme poverty and rising food prices couple with an oversupply of cheap labour has meant that many people can only afford to eat once a day. Many labourers sell their services up to a year ahead and have been caught out by rampant food prices which are beyond the reach of their wages. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. The price of food staples have doubled in the last 5 months and civil unrest is a possibility in the near future. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, and a loss of government subsidies for food staples combined with the world's highest flood plain has meant that many people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
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 RANGPUR, NORTHERN BANGLADESH - JULY 2008: An impoverished farmer in rural Rangpur, Bangladesh on 2 August 2008. This farmer is a labourer on rice growing land. During his lunch break he takes a break from planting to try to catch small fish. These he sells in the market in the evening. This allows him to buy his family one full meal a day. A great deal of rural labour is sourced a year ahead by landowners. A small fee is agreed but because of the recent massive rise in food costs the very poor can no longer afford food on the agreed salaries. The price of rice has more than doubled in the last five months. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, a loss of government subsidies for food staples and subsequent price increases from merchant stockpiling has meant that many poor people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 KAZALDANGA, BANGLADESH-AUGUST 2008: Flood affected villagers eke out a living with the help of BRAC and WFP, Kazaldanga, Northern Bangladesh, 2 August 2008. Flooding, Poverty and lack of protected land ownership amongst the poor is driving a serious food crisis in Bangladesh. A male labourers makes around 90 US cents a day while a women makes around 50 US cents a day working in the fields. Extreme poverty and rising food prices couple with an oversupply of cheap labour has meant that many people can only afford to eat once a day.  Many labourers sell their services up to a year ahead and have been caught out by rampant food prices which are beyond the reach of their wages. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. The price of food staples have doubled in the last 5 months and civil unrest is a possibility in the near future. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, and a loss of government subsidies for food staples combined with the world's highest flood plain has meant that many people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 GAIBANDAH, BANGLADESH-AUGUST 2008: Vulnerable farmers on flood damaged islands work to clear rice fields damaged by annual floods which destroy crops and homes amongst the poor on a yearly basis, Gaibandah, Bangladesh, 2 August 2008. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. The price of food staples have doubled in the last 5 months and civil unrest is a possibility in the near future. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, and a loss of government subsidies for food staples combined with the world's highest flood plain has meant that many people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 KURIGAM, BANGLADESH-AUGUST 2008: Children at school receive World Food Program biscuits containing 14 essential vitamins and minerals In Kurigam, Northern Bangladesh, 2 August 2008. As a result of dire poverty and rising food prices for many of these children this is often their only meal of the day. Over 17 tons of these biscuits are distributed daily in the district and over 400 tons are distributed monthly. As a result schood attendance is now at 99% as opposed to the previous 64%. The biscuit program has also seen less children involved in child labor programs as they can now be fed at school as opposed to having to earn their food through work. Poverty and lack of land ownership amongst the poor is driving a serious food crisis in Bangladesh. A male labourers makes around 90 US cents a day while a women makes around 50 US cents a day working in these fields. Extreme poverty and rising food prices couple with an oversupply of cheap labour has meant that many people can only afford to eat once a day.  Many labourers sell their services up to a year ahead and have been caught out by rampant food prices which are beyond the reach of their wages. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. The price of food staples have doubled in the last 5 months and civil unrest is a possibility in the near future. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, and a loss of government subsidies for food staples combined with the world's highest flood plain has meant that many people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 KURIGAM, BANGLADESH-AUGUST 2008: Children at school receive World Food Program biscuits containing 14 essential vitamins and minerals In Kurigam, Northern Bangladesh, 2 August 2008. As a result of dire poverty and rising food prices for many of these children this is often their only meal of the day. Over 17 tons of these biscuits are distributed daily in the district and over 400 tons are distributed monthly. As a result schood attendance is now at 99% as opposed to the previous 64%. The biscuit program has also seen less children involved in child labor programs as they can now be fed at school as opposed to having to earn their food through work. Poverty and lack of land ownership amongst the poor is driving a serious food crisis in Bangladesh. A male labourers makes around 90 US cents a day while a women makes around 50 US cents a day working in these fields. Extreme poverty and rising food prices couple with an oversupply of cheap labour has meant that many people can only afford to eat once a day.  Many labourers sell their services up to a year ahead and have been caught out by rampant food prices which are beyond the reach of their wages. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. The price of food staples have doubled in the last 5 months and civil unrest is a possibility in the near future. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, and a loss of government subsidies for food staples combined with the world's highest flood plain has meant that many people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 KURIGAM, BANGLADESH-AUGUST 2008: Children at school receive World Food Program biscuits containing 14 essential vitamins and minerals In Kurigam, Northern Bangladesh, 2 August 2008. As a result of dire poverty and rising food prices for many of these children this is often their only meal of the day. Over 17 tons of these biscuits are distributed daily in the district and over 400 tons are distributed monthly. As a result schood attendance is now at 99% as opposed to the previous 64%. The biscuit program has also seen less children involved in child labor programs as they can now be fed at school as opposed to having to earn their food through work. Poverty and lack of land ownership amongst the poor is driving a serious food crisis in Bangladesh. A male labourers makes around 90 US cents a day while a women makes around 50 US cents a day working in these fields. Extreme poverty and rising food prices couple with an oversupply of cheap labour has meant that many people can only afford to eat once a day.  Many labourers sell their services up to a year ahead and have been caught out by rampant food prices which are beyond the reach of their wages. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. The price of food staples have doubled in the last 5 months and civil unrest is a possibility in the near future. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, and a loss of government subsidies for food staples combined with the world's highest flood plain has meant that many people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 KURIGAM, BANGLADESH-AUGUST 2008: Children at school receive World Food Program biscuits containing 14 essential vitamins and minerals In Kurigam, Northern Bangladesh, 2 August 2008. As a result of dire poverty and rising food prices for many of these children this is often their only meal of the day. Over 17 tons of these biscuits are distributed daily in the district and over 400 tons are distributed monthly. As a result schood attendance is now at 99% as opposed to the previous 64%. The biscuit program has also seen less children involved in child labor programs as they can now be fed at school as opposed to having to earn their food through work. Poverty and lack of land ownership amongst the poor is driving a serious food crisis in Bangladesh. A male labourers makes around 90 US cents a day while a women makes around 50 US cents a day working in these fields. Extreme poverty and rising food prices couple with an oversupply of cheap labour has meant that many people can only afford to eat once a day.  Many labourers sell their services up to a year ahead and have been caught out by rampant food prices which are beyond the reach of their wages. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. The price of food staples have doubled in the last 5 months and civil unrest is a possibility in the near future. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, and a loss of government subsidies for food staples combined with the world's highest flood plain has meant that many people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 RANGPUR, NORTHERN BANGLADESH - JULY 2008: Labourers work in the testing fields planting and harvesting experimental rice varieties at the RDRS Hybrid Rice Growing Project in rural Rangpur, Bangladesh, 2 August 2008. This project has successfully developed a new strain of rice that can be grown inbetween the traditional periods where rice is grown. The rice can also be chopped off at the base and will then regrown unlike traditional strains which makes replanting unneccesary. It is also hardier and can grow in less perfect conditions than traditional rice. This RDRS Hybrid project makes the point that there is inadequate production for the population of Bangladesh and is attempting to address that. The price of rice has more than doubled in the last five months. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, a loss of government subsidies for food staples and subsequent price increases from merchant stockpiling has meant that many poor people are down to one meal a day. An additional crop a year would bring much needed relief as well as the possibility of moving beyond food security into a cash crop for many poor farmers.  (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 RANGPUR, NORTHERN BANGLADESH - JULY 2008: Labourers work in the testing fields planting and harvesting experimental rice varieties at the RDRS Hybrid Rice Growing Project in rural Rangpur, Bangladesh, 2 August 2008. This project has successfully developed a new strain of rice that can be grown inbetween the traditional periods where rice is grown. The rice can also be chopped off at the base and will then regrown unlike traditional strains which makes replanting unneccesary. It is also hardier and can grow in less perfect conditions than traditional rice. This RDRS Hybrid project makes the point that there is inadequate production for the population of Bangladesh and is attempting to address that. The price of rice has more than doubled in the last five months. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, a loss of government subsidies for food staples and subsequent price increases from merchant stockpiling has meant that many poor people are down to one meal a day. An additional crop a year would bring much needed relief as well as the possibility of moving beyond food security into a cash crop for many poor farmers.  (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 GAIBANDAH, BANGLADESH-AUGUST 2008: Laborers at work in Rice fields in Gaibandah, Northern Bangladesh, 2 August 2008. Poverty and lack of land ownership amongst the poor is driving a serious food crisis in Bangladesh. A male labourers makes around 90 US cents a day while a women makes around 50 US cents a day working in these fields. Extreme poverty and rising food prices couple with an oversupply of cheap labour has meant that many people can only afford to eat once a day.  Many labourers sell their services up to a year ahead and have been caught out by rampant food prices which are beyond the reach of their wages. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. The price of food staples have doubled in the last 5 months and civil unrest is a possibility in the near future. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, and a loss of government subsidies for food staples combined with the world's highest flood plain has meant that many people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 RANGPUR, BANGLADESH-AUGUST 2008: An Atta production factory run by World Food Program in Rangpur, Northern Bangladesh, 2 August 2008. This food is distributed to vulnerable groups who are not able to support themselves and can no longer afford food. Flooding, Poverty and lack of protected land ownership amongst the poor is driving a serious food crisis in Bangladesh. A male labourer makes around 90 US cents a day while a women makes around 50 US cents a day working in the fields. Extreme poverty and rising food prices couple with an oversupply of cheap labour has meant that many people can only afford to eat once a day.  Many labourers sell their services up to a year ahead and have been caught out by rampant food prices which are beyond the reach of their wages. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. The price of food staples have doubled in the last 5 months and civil unrest is a possibility in the near future. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, and a loss of government subsidies for food staples combined with the world's highest flood plain has meant that many people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 GAIBANDAH, BANGLADESH-AUGUST 2008: Vulnerable farmers work as day labourers for menial wages in rice fields near to Gaibandah, Northern Bangladesh, 2 August 2008. Poverty and lack of land ownership amongst the poor is driving a serious food crisis in Bangladesh. A male labourers makes around 90 US cents a day while a women makes around 50 US cents a day working in these fields. Extreme poverty and rising food prices couple with an oversupply of cheap labour has meant that many people can only afford to eat once a day.  Many labourers sell their services up to a year ahead and have been caught out by rampant food prices which are beyond the reach of their wages. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. The price of food staples have doubled in the last 5 months and civil unrest is a possibility in the near future. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, and a loss of government subsidies for food staples combined with the world's highest flood plain has meant that many people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 GAIBANDAH, BANGLADESH-AUGUST 2008: Rice fields in Gaibandah, Northern Bangladesh, 2 August 2008. Poverty and lack of land ownership amongst the poor is driving a serious food crisis in Bangladesh. A male labourers makes around 90 US cents a day while a women makes around 50 US cents a day working in these fields. Extreme poverty and rising food prices couple with an oversupply of cheap labour has meant that many people can only afford to eat once a day.  Many labourers sell their services up to a year ahead and have been caught out by rampant food prices which are beyond the reach of their wages. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. The price of food staples have doubled in the last 5 months and civil unrest is a possibility in the near future. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, and a loss of government subsidies for food staples combined with the world's highest flood plain has meant that many people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 GAIBANDAH, BANGLADESH-AUGUST 2008: Female labourers at work in Rice fields in Gaibandah, Northern Bangladesh, 2 August 2008. Poverty and lack of land ownership amongst the poor is driving a serious food crisis in Bangladesh. A male labourers makes around 90 US cents a day while a women makes around 50 US cents a day working in these fields. Extreme poverty and rising food prices couple with an oversupply of cheap labour has meant that many people can only afford to eat once a day.  Many labourers sell their services up to a year ahead and have been caught out by rampant food prices which are beyond the reach of their wages. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. The price of food staples have doubled in the last 5 months and civil unrest is a possibility in the near future. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, and a loss of government subsidies for food staples combined with the world's highest flood plain has meant that many people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 GAIBANDAH, BANGLADESH-AUGUST 2008: Vulnerable farmers work as day labourers for menial wages in rice fields near to Gaibandah, Northern Bangladesh, 2 August 2008. Poverty and lack of land ownership amongst the poor is driving a serious food crisis in Bangladesh. A male labourers makes around 90 US cents a day while a women makes around 50 US cents a day working in these fields. Extreme poverty and rising food prices couple with an oversupply of cheap labour has meant that many people can only afford to eat once a day.  Many labourers sell their services up to a year ahead and have been caught out by rampant food prices which are beyond the reach of their wages. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. The price of food staples have doubled in the last 5 months and civil unrest is a possibility in the near future. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, and a loss of government subsidies for food staples combined with the world's highest flood plain has meant that many people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 GAIBANDAH, BANGLADESH-AUGUST 2008: Vulnerable farmers work as day labourers for menial wages in rice fields near to Gaibandah, Northern Bangladesh, 2 August 2008. Poverty and lack of land ownership amongst the poor is driving a serious food crisis in Bangladesh. A male labourers makes around 90 US cents a day while a women makes around 50 US cents a day working in these fields. Extreme poverty and rising food prices couple with an oversupply of cheap labour has meant that many people can only afford to eat once a day.  Many labourers sell their services up to a year ahead and have been caught out by rampant food prices which are beyond the reach of their wages. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. The price of food staples have doubled in the last 5 months and civil unrest is a possibility in the near future. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, and a loss of government subsidies for food staples combined with the world's highest flood plain has meant that many people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 DHAKA, BANGLADESH - JULY 2008: Food market scenes in Dhaka, Bangladesh on 31 July 2008. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, and a loss of government subsidies for food staples has meant that many people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 DHAKA, BANGLADESH - JULY 2008: Scenes from food markets in Dhaka, Bangladesh on 31 July 2008. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. Rising world energy prices, one of the worlds poorest populations, and a loss of government subsidies for food staples has meant that many people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 DHAKA, BANGLADESH - JULY 2008: Scenes from food markets in Dhaka, Bangladesh on 31 July 2008. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. Rising world energy prices, one of the worlds poorest populations, and a loss of government subsidies for food staples has meant that many people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 DHAKA, BANGLADESH - JULY 2008: A young Rickshaw Puller eats his single meal of the day in an impoverished slum area of Dhaka, Bangladesh on 31 July 2008.  Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, a loss of government subsidies for food staples and subsequent price increases from merchant stockpiling has meant that many poor people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 RANGPUR, BANGLADESH-AUGUST 2008: A seed and fertilizer dealer in Rangpur, Northern Bangladesh, 2 August 2008. It is hoped that hybrid techniques and fertilizers will help farmers to provide greater yielding crops in the face of a looming food crisis. Flooding, Poverty and lack of protected land ownership amongst the poor is driving a serious food crisis in Bangladesh. A male labourers makes around 90 US cents a day while a women makes around 50 US cents a day working in the fields. Extreme poverty and rising food prices couple with an oversupply of cheap labour has meant that many people can only afford to eat once a day.  Many labourers sell their services up to a year ahead and have been caught out by rampant food prices which are beyond the reach of their wages. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. The price of food staples have doubled in the last 5 months and civil unrest is a possibility in the near future. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, and a loss of government subsidies for food staples combined with the world's highest flood plain has meant that many people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 DHAKA, BANGLADESH - JULY 2008: Scenes at a rice warehouse in Dhaka, Bangladesh on 31 July 2008. The young girls sweep up spilt rice all day and in exchange they are given a kilo and a half of rice to take home. In many cases these young children are responsible for the main family meal. Rice has tripled in price over the last year devastating poor families in Bangladesh. This is a result of food insecurity and resultant market speculation, natural disaster affecting  crop yields, rising energy costs affecting food prices and the loss of a government subsidy for cheap staple foods for the poor. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. This has left many thousands of families surviving on one meal a day.  (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 DHAKA, BANGLADESH - JULY 2008: Scenes at a rice warehouse in Dhaka, Bangladesh on 31 July 2008. The young girls sweep up spilt rice all day and in exchange they are given a kilo and a half of rice to take home. In many cases these young children are responsible for the main family meal. Rice has tripled in price over the last year devastating poor families in Bangladesh. This is a result of food insecurity and resultant market speculation, natural disaster affecting  crop yields, rising energy costs affecting food prices and the loss of a government subsidy for cheap staple foods for the poor. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. This has left many thousands of families surviving on one meal a day.  (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 DHAKA, BANGLADESH - JULY 2008: Panna Kalam,7, is the daughter of poor slum dwellers in Dhaka, Bangladesh on 31 July 2008. She spends her day searching through food markets for whatever scraps she can find on the floor and in the garbage. Her father is ill and her mother is busy with the other children. Panna and her scavenging is the only support for her family. Due to the huge rise in food prices they are more dependant on her than ever. Despite this, she remains a bouyant and optimistic little girl who undertakes her job with great pride. Many slum dwelling mothers are malnourished due to rsing food prices and they pass on this condition through inadequate nutrients in breast milk or being unable to feed their children properly. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, and a loss of government subsidies for food staples has meant that many people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 DHAKA, BANGLADESH - JULY 2008: Panna Kalam,7, is the daughter of poor slum dwellers in Dhaka, Bangladesh on 31 July 2008. She spends her day searching through food markets for whatever scraps she can find on the floor and in the garbage. Her father is ill and her mother is busy with the other children. Panna and her scavenging is the only support for her family. Due to the huge rise in food prices they are more dependant on her than ever. Despite this, she remains a bouyant and optimistic little girl who undertakes her job with great pride. Many slum dwelling mothers are malnourished due to rsing food prices and they pass on this condition through inadequate nutrients in breast milk or being unable to feed their children properly. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, and a loss of government subsidies for food staples has meant that many people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 DHAKA, BANGLADESH - JULY 2008: Panna Kalam,7, is the daughter of poor slum dwellers in Dhaka, Bangladesh on 31 July 2008. She spends her day searching through food markets for whatever scraps she can find on the floor and in the garbage. Her father is ill and her mother is busy with the other children. Panna and her scavenging is the only support for her family. Due to the huge rise in food prices they are more dependant on her than ever. Despite this, she remains a bouyant and optimistic little girl who undertakes her job with great pride. Many slum dwelling mothers are malnourished due to rsing food prices and they pass on this condition through inadequate nutrients in breast milk or being unable to feed their children properly. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, and a loss of government subsidies for food staples has meant that many people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
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 RIFT VALLEY PROVINCE, KENYA, NOVEMBER 2009: Images of a massacre site where the Pokot tribesman came out of the Rift Valley, their traditional area, and attacked a Samburu village over cattle grazing rights in the north of Kenya at a time of the worst drought in the region for the last 100 years, 20 November 2009. 25 Samburu men, women and children were killed in the attack, over 50 cattle were shot and over 300 died later in the week from not being able to access grazing land because of the threat of the Pokot. The drought has brought about increasingly deadly conflict between pastoralists as well as conservationists all competing for grazing land. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage by Getty Images.)
 RIFT VALLEY PROVINCE, KENYA, NOVEMBER 2009: Samburu pastoralists drain blood to mix with milk from an emaciated cow in Samburu National Park in the north of Kenya at a time of the worst drought in Kenya for the last 100 years, 20 November 2009. These cattle are the last remaining of a herd of 300 which have succumbed to the worst drought to hit Kenya in over 100 years. Many Samburu now face starvation as a result of their decimated herds being unable to supply a steady food supply for communities. Tensions are high as pastoralists tribes as well as conservationists are all competing for tiny pockets of grazing land. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage by Getty Images.)
 KOYA, MARSABIT SOUTH, NORTH KENYA: Rendille Morans dig water for goats and camels in an area designated as sustainable by the Melako Conservancy comittee, Koya, North Kenya, 28 February 2010. The Melako Conservancy is run by the local community with advice from the Northern Rangeland Trust, an NGO which seeks to advise communities on sustainable pastoral practises and ways to leverage wildlife for conservancy and income purposes. In this area they have been instrumental in advising the locals how to graze cattle sustainably in a controlled pattern and keep them out of sensitive wildlife areas so that they can build viable tourism from which the community derives an annual guaranteed income. (Photo by Brent Stirton/ Reportage by Getty Images.)
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 CAMEROON, JULY 2010: Local people with bushmeat sold and purchased all along the logging roads of Cameroon, this is not an illegal activity at this time but as logging creates roads and towns the pressure on bushmeat is rapidly becoming unsustainable and unless controlled may lead to the rapid eradication of most forest creatures, Cameroon, June 6, 2010. The Congo Basin forests cover an area the combined size of France and South Africa. The forests of Cameroon form a large part of this basin. Still relatively intact and connected, these forest ecosystems and freshwater systems are home to abundant wildlife and provide food, shelter, clean water and protection against floods to more than 75 million people. The economic value of these systems is enormous. Timber alone is worth several Billion Euros annually to the Forest industry, while minerals are also being heavily exploited. The importance of the Congo Basin as a global, natural reservoir to store Carbon is also massive. CO2 emissions from deforestation of this region could be devastating for agriculture and water resources. The challenges for Cameroon are enormous. If social and economic development needs are to be met, then development will have to be sustainable. As such a number of key threats will have to be addressed: 1.	Unsustainable Timber exploitation – as much 50% of all timber from the region is believed to be illegal. This represents 10-15 billion Euros annually.2.	Major Infrastructure Development – this is linked to the increasing exploitation of logging, mining and oil exploration as well as potential dam building. 3.	Unsustainable levels of bush meat hunting – population increase, bush roads, trucking to and from remote areas all lead to increased food pressures.4.	Growing human Populations – increased cultivation of food within forests.5.	Weak governance and rule of law – corruption and inequitable division of profits derived from the forests.
The answers:  1.	Sustainable Forest managemen
 NYABISSAM, CAMEROON, JULY 2011: A woman prepares a porcupine for the pot in a small Cameroonian village close to to Nyabissam, July 27, 2011. This woman risks the transmission of animal disease pathogens to her own body during the bloody preparation process. Any cuts on her hands or arms could see a transmission of disease from the animal to her, a fact that many consumers of bushmeat are unaware. Dr Nathan D. Wolfe, an American virologist who is the Director of the Global Viral Forecasting Initiative and the Lorry I. Lokey Visiting Professor in Human Biology at Stanford University. Dr. Wolfe spent over eight years conducting biomedical research in both sub-Saharan Africa and Southeast Asia. In 2007, he founded the Global Viral Forecasting Initiative with the goal of developing an early warning system for pandemics to monitor the transmission of infectious diseases from animals to humans. The initiative currently coordinates a staff of over 100 scientists in China, Cameroon, Equatorial Guinea, DR Congo, PR Congo, Lao, Gabon, Central African Republic, Malaysia, Madagascar and Sao Tome. He also directs Global Viral Forecasting Inc. which offers both governmental and corporate services for biological threat evaluation and management. He works with local hunters in the forests of Cameroon. Wolfe has a long history with these small animal hunters with whom he collaborates in obtaining vital blood samples to monitor emerging Pathogens which may be harmful to both humans and wildlife. Small mammals can be reservoirs for new and emerging infectious diseases. The most famous example of this is the the HIV Virus which emerged from Chimp DNA which combined with that of the monkeys the Chimps ate. Blood to blood contact between Chimps hunted for food and human's who becames infected through contact with infected chimps. Wolfe's mission is to guard the frontline of infectious disease, searching for the next pandemic, serving the frontline in the war against the next super-virus.
 LAKE TURKANA, NORTHERN KENYA, MAY 2010: Dasenetch pastoralist people with their catch of Tilapia fish in Lake Turkana in North Kenya, 20 May 2010. Fishing is a relatively new phenomenon for the Dasenetch, drought and climate change have forced them to look further than cattle for alternative sources of sustenance and economy. Fishing has become the primary means in the Lake Turkana region but has yet to reach any real commercial significance. The lake is the largest desert lake in the world and sustains both Turkana and Dasenetch people as well as Gabra and other tribes in the region. Lake Turkana faces an uncertain future however as the Gibe 3 dam project in Ethiopia, a massive hydro-electric scheme  and Ethiopia's biggest single investment, comes on line. The dam project, designed to create electricity for sale to surrounding countries including Kenya, will reduce the flow of the Omo river dramatically and this river is the main feeder river for Lake Turkana. Significant changes in lake levels and in ecology can be expected as a result. Fertile flood plain invaluable for agriculture will also be negatively impacted. All of this bodes badly for the pastoralists of the Lake Turkana and Southern Ethiopia's Omo river region, these groups are already under severe subsistence pressure and there is a long history of armed conflict in the region. Weapons flow in to this region through Sudan and Somalia and there is little control over this trade which looks likely to accelerate if pressures increase in this region. At this time the Dam project has full support from Kenya's Nairobi government, despite the fact that there has been no Environmental Impact Asssesment produced for this scheme. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage by Getty Images.)
 BUNGOMA, KENYA - 13 SEPTEMBER: Images of Dominion Farm, the largest private American investment in Kenya, September 13, 2007 in Bungoma, Kenya. The farm's owners are staunch Christians but unlike most evangelical movements who come to Africa they do not wish to provide traditional aid, they wish to uplift the people via good sustainable realistic business sense. The farm specialises in massive Fish breeding and massive Rice production and has resisted protest and corruption on their way to success. They believe in the business potential of Africa and Africans and express disapointment at the lack of American business investment in Africa. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
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 KISUMU, KENYA - 10 SEPTEMBER: Images of a subsidised bee-keeper at work in the Sauri Millenium village, September 10, 2007 in Kisumu, Kenya. The pictures illustrate succesful production based on five years of initial structured financing of rural communities which allows small farmers to reach sustainability and the ability to support themselves. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 BUNGOMA, KENYA - 11 SEPTEMBER: Images of trials for maize growing with different varieties of seed, September 11, 2007 in Bungoma, Kenya. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 Nairobi, Kenya - 9 September: Akinwumi Adesina, associate director of Food Security for the Rockefeller Foundation and winner of the Yara Prize 2007, a major award for his role in advancing the African green revolution, September 9, 2007 in Nairobi, Kenya. Adesina evolved a system for implementing vastly more efficent farming methods and access to fertilisers for African nations.(Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 BUNGOMA, KENYA - 11 SEPTEMBER: Images of students and teachers at Sacred Africa agricultural college, September 11, 2007 in Bungoma, Kenya. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 KISUMU, KENYA - 10 SEPTEMBER: Images of a female agro-dealer in the market places of the Sauri Millenium village, September 10, 2007 in Kisumu, Kenya. The pictures illustrate succesful production based on five years of initial structured financing of rural communities which allows small farmers to reach sustainability and the ability to support themselves. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 BUNGOMA, KENYA - 11 SEPTEMBER: Images at KACE market information point where local farmers can use information and cell phones to stay informed on market prices throughout the region, September 11, 2007 in Bungoma, Kenya. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 BUNGOMA, KENYA - 11 SEPTEMBER: Images of SACRED cereal bank and co-operative members at work, September 11, 2008 in Bungoma, Kenya. These cereal banks function as security for many of the farmers in this region. The corn is stored as capital which allows them to pay for thing s like medicine and education for their children and also to aquire micro-loans for business expansion.(Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 TABORA, TANZANIA, AUGUST 2007: Succesful crop harvesting in Tabora, Tanzania, 27 August 2008. Small financing and agricultural education from WWF and the Millenium Village foundation have subsequently enabled farmers in this part of Tanzania to develop land for crop production far more efficently than before thereby guaranteeing food security and a better life for local people. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage by Getty Images.)
 KISUMU, KENYA - 11 SEPTEMBER: The secretary of a local newly- formed farmer's group in the Sauri Millenium village locale, September 11, 2007 in Kisumu, Kenya.  He stands with his maize crop which will soon be pooled with the other farmers as they seek to reinforce each others efforts. The Millenium Village concept is based on succesful production based on five years of initial structured financing of rural communities which allows small farmers to reach sustainability and the ability to support themselves. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 KISUMU, KENYA - 11 SEPTEMBER: A young mother and her child prepare lunch in their small hut in the Sauri Millenium village locale, September 11, 2007 in Kisumu, Kenya. The Millenium Village concept is based on succesful production based on five years of initial structured financing of rural communities which allows small farmers to reach sustainability and the ability to support themselves. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 KISUMU, KENYA - 11 SEPTEMBER: A rural woman and her children prepare for bed underneath donated repellent-impregnated mosqito netting in the Sauri Millenium village locale, September 11, 2007 in Kisumu, Kenya. Malaria rates in the area have dropped by over 400% as a result of the donated netting, freeing farmers of disease and making for a more productive populace. The Millenium Village concept is based on succesful production based on five years of initial structured financing of rural communities which allows small farmers to reach sustainability and the ability to support themselves. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 BUNGOMA, KENYA - 13 SEPTEMBER: Images of HoneyCare projects for receiving, manufacturing, processing and delivery of honey by rural farmers, September 11, 2007 in Bungoma, Kenya. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 KISUMU, KENYA - 10 SEPTEMBER: Images of diverse agricultural production and farming in the Sauri Millenium village, September 10, 2007 in Kisumu, Kenya. The pictures illustrate succesful production based on five years of initial structured financing of rural communities which allows small farmers to reach sustainability and the ability to support themselves. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 TABORA, TANZANIA, AUGUST 2007: A Tanzanian woman runs a small business selling small food parcels which she buys in bulk at a Millenium Village sponsored village in Tabora, Tanzania, 27 August 2008. Small financing and agricultural education from WWF and the Millenium Village foundation have subsequently enabled farmers in this part of Tanzania to develop land for crop production far more efficently than before thereby guaranteeing food security and a better life for local people. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage by Getty Images.)
 BUNGOMA, KENYA - 13 SEPTEMBER: Images of HoneyCare projects for receiving, manufacturing, processing and delivery of honey by rural farmers, September 11, 2007 in Bungoma, Kenya. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 ORNGAYANET, NAROK SOUTH, KENYA, FEBRUARY 2010: Pastoralist Masaai prepare a field of Maize in Orngayanet, Kenya, 22 February, 2010. Crop cultivation is a relatively new thing for the Masaai, and is a result of living next to other tribes who practise agricultural and have fared better than the Masaai with their cattle in times of drought and disease and shrinking grazing land. There are now large fields of maize under cultivation by the Masaai as some move from pastoralism towards a more stable means of income and subsistence. The main priorities of the Pastorilists around Kenya is access to medical treatment, education for their children and access to water for good grazing. The culture around cattle however means that selling them for money for these purposes is often a reluctant process. As land for grazing diminishes and drough and climate change and overpopulation loom, these practises will have to change if pastoralists are to move into a modern way of life. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage by Getty Images.)
 KISUMU, KENYA - 10 SEPTEMBER: Images of diverse agricultural production and farming in the Sauri Millenium village, September 10, 2007 in Kisumu, Kenya. The pictures illustrate succesful production based on five years of initial structured financing of rural communities which allows small farmers to reach sustainability and the ability to support themselves. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 TABORA, TANZANIA, AUGUST 2007: Succesful crop harvesting in Tabora, Tanzania, 27 August 2008. Small financing and agricultural education from WWF and the Millenium Village foundation have subsequently enabled farmers in this part of Tanzania to develop land for crop production far more efficently than before thereby guaranteeing food security and a better life for local people. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage by Getty Images.)
 TABORA, TANZANIA, AUGUST 2007: Succesful crop harvesting in Tabora, Tanzania, 27 August 2008. Small financing and agricultural education from WWF and the Millenium Village foundation have subsequently enabled farmers in this part of Tanzania to develop land for crop production far more efficently than before thereby guaranteeing food security and a better life for local people. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage by Getty Images.)
 KISUMU, KENYA - 10 SEPTEMBER: Images of diverse agricultural production and farming in the Sauri Millenium village, September 10, 2007 in Kisumu, Kenya. The pictures illustrate succesful production based on five years of initial structured financing of rural communities which allows small farmers to reach sustainability and the ability to support themselves. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 NAIROBI, KENYA - 13 SEPTEMBER: Images of Promisador/Nutro grain and maize facility, September 13, 2007 in Nairobi, Kenya. This surplus will be shipped all over Africa for food aid and is possible because of new techniques in food production brought about by the Millenium Village concept of subsidy and education leading to self sustaing local enterprise. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 BUNGOMA, KENYA - 13 SEPTEMBER: Images of rice production in the factory on Dominion Farm, the largest private American investment in Kenya, September 13, 2007 in Bungoma, Kenya. The farm's owners are staunch Christians but unlike most evangelical movements who come to Africa they do not wish to provide traditional aid, they wish to uplift the people via good sustainable realistic business sense. The farm specialises in massive Fish breeding and massive Rice production and has resisted protest and corruption on their way to success. They believe in the business potential of Africa and Africans and express disapointment at the lack of American business investment in Africa. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 KISUMU, KENYA - 11 SEPTEMBER: Scenes from the Yara Market for local produce and goods in the Sauri Millenium village locale, September 11, 2007 in Kisumu, Kenya. The Millenium Village concept is based on succesful production based on five years of initial structured financing of rural communities which allows small farmers to reach sustainability and the ability to support themselves. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 KISUMU, KENYA - 13 SEPTEMBER: Images of local agricultural produce at the Jubilee market, September 13, 2007 in Kisumu, Kenya. The market is a new facility financed in conjunction with various NGO's. It provides a retail outlet for the farmers of the Millenium Village project who have benefitted from a short term loan subsidy and agricultural education. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 KISUMU, KENYA - 11 SEPTEMBER: Scenes from the Yara Market for local produce and goods in the Sauri Millenium village locale, September 11, 2007 in Kisumu, Kenya. The Millenium Village concept is based on succesful production based on five years of initial structured financing of rural communities which allows small farmers to reach sustainability and the ability to support themselves. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 NAIROBI, KENYA - 13 SEPTEMBER: Images of export packaging at the "Fresh and Juicy" warehouse facility, where organic produce from rural farmers supported by the Millenium Village project, is readied for export, September 13, 2007, Nairobi, Kenya. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 ZOMBA, MALAWI-JULY 2008: A poor farmer mixes home-made manure which has trebled his crop yield over the last 3 years, Zomba, Malawi, 17 July 2008. His cabbage fields and maize crop have allowed him to pay school fees for his children and build a new house. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 KASUNGO, MALAWI-JULY 2008: A rural village has taken its food security a step further by building a dam for rainwater and then using footpumps and watering cans to get the water to fields to grow maize, Kasungo, Malawi, 14 July 2008. (photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 KASUNGO, MALAWI-JULY 2008: A rural village has taken its food security a step further by building a dam for rainwater and then using footpumps and watering cans to get the water to fields to grow maize, Kasungo, Malawi, 14 July 2008. (photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 ZOMBA, MALAWI-JULY 2007: Patrick Khovima, 33, a poor farmer, has built a field irrigation system from a simple trench and plastic which he uses a leg pump to irrigate. He has trebled his crop yield over the last year as a result, Zomba, Malawi, 17 July 2007. He has built a better house, bught a sofa and tv and is saving for iron sheeting for the roof of his house. These techniques have allowed Malawi to turn around an agricultural nightmare into the biggest success in the region in only a 3 year period. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 ZOMBA, MALAWI-JULY 2008: A poor farmer's co-operative has built a field irrigation system from a simple trench and plastic which has trebled their crop yield over the last 3 years, Zomba, Malawi, 17 July 2008. New techniques with UNDP/Millenium Village expertise have allowed Malawi to turn around an agricultural nightmare into the biggest success in the region in only a 3 year period. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 ZOMBA, MALAWI-JULY 2007: Agricultural supply stores in Zomba, Malawi, 17 July 2007. Many farmers in Malawi credit their recent success to hybrid seeds and fertilizers which have in many cases more than doubled their crops and enabled them to produce a winter crop as well. (photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 ZOMBA, MALAWI-JULY 2008: A poor farmer holds home-made manure which has trebled his crop yield over the last 3 years, Zomba, Malawi, 17 July 2008. (photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 MZIMBA, MALAWI-JULY 2008: A farming community harvests corn in Mzimba, Malawi, 17 July 2008. This is a bumper year for Malawian farmers. Many farmers in Malawi credit their recent success to progessive agriculture which includes hybrid seeds and fertilizers which have in many cases more than doubled their crops and enabled them to produce a winter crop as well. This has enabled many farmers to escape food insecurity, build their own homes, buy bicycles and send their children to school with schoolfees. (photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 MZIMBA, MALAWI-JULY 2008: A farming community harvests corn in Mzimba, Malawi, 17 July 2008. This is a bumper year for Malawian farmers. Many farmers in Malawi credit their recent success to progessive agriculture which includes hybrid seeds and fertilizers which have in many cases more than doubled their crops and enabled them to produce a winter crop as well. This has enabled many farmers to escape food insecurity, build their own homes, buy bicycles and send their children to school with schoolfees. (photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 MZIMBA, MALAWI-JULY 2008: A farming community harvests corn in Mzimba, Malawi, 17 July 2008. This is a bumper year for Malawian farmers. Many farmers in Malawi credit their recent success to progessive agriculture which includes hybrid seeds and fertilizers which have in many cases more than doubled their crops and enabled them to produce a winter crop as well. This has enabled many farmers to escape food insecurity, build their own homes, buy bicycles and send their children to school with schoolfees. (photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 MZIMBA, MALAWI-JULY 2008: A farming community harvests corn in Mzimba, Malawi, 17 July 2008. This is a bumper year for Malawian farmers. Many farmers in Malawi credit their recent success to progessive agriculture which includes hybrid seeds and fertilizers which have in many cases more than doubled their crops and enabled them to produce a winter crop as well. This has enabled many farmers to escape food insecurity, build their own homes, buy bicycles and send their children to school with schoolfees. (photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 MZIMBA, MALAWI-JULY 2008: A Malawian farming family harvests corn in rural Mzimba, Malawi, 17 July 2008. This is a bumper year for Malawian farmers. Many farmers in Malawi credit their recent success to progessive agriculture which includes hybrid seeds and fertilizers which have in many cases more than doubled their crops and enabled them to produce a winter crop as well. This has enabled many farmers to escape food insecurity, build their own homes, buy bicycles and send their children to school with schoolfees. (photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 ZOMBA, MALAWI-JULY 2007: Grain Bank storage with new elevated storage techniques at the Millenium Village facility in Zomba, Malawi, 17 July 2007. This grain bank stores at least 3 bags for each family in the scheme, in many cases far more. This provides financial security for families and also allows a financial system to develop which will make the farmers independant of aid. Many farmers in Malawi credit their recent success to hybrid seeds and fertilizers which have in many cases more than doubled their crops and enabled them to produce a winter crop as well. (photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 MZIMBA, MALAWI-JULY 2008: A Malawian farmer stands in a rural field of sweet potatoes in Mzimba, Malawi, 17 July 2008. This is a bumper year for Malawian farmers and the sweet potatoes are a cash crop, maize is plentiful and this food security allows farmers to grow cash crops such as sweet potato. Many farmers in Malawi credit their recent success to progessive agriculture which includes hybrid seeds and fertilizers which have in many cases more than doubled their crops and enabled them to produce a winter crop as well. This has enabled many farmers to escape food insecurity, build their own homes, buy bicycles and send their children to school with school fees. (photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 ZOMBA, MALAWI-JULY 2008: Alex Kampuku with his goats and his daughter Jdesi, Zomba, Malawi, 17 July 2008. To assist impoverished farmers the Millenium Project gives two goats to people who could never afford to buy them, after the goats have mated a few times, the farmers then pass on a breeding pair to another impoverished farmer. This provides an income and also a source of animal protein for farmer's diets. (photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 BUNGOMA, KENYA - 13 SEPTEMBER: Images of a poor, rural, outdoor school for young children, September 11, 2007 in Bungoma, Kenya. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 RURAL KAMPALA, UGANDA - 13 SEPTEMBER: Images of a rural school for young children outside Kampala, Uganda, 1 October 2008. Rural people polled in this area and in most of rural Africa have consistently said that their number one priority once food security is acheived is to be able to educate and uplift their children. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 LILONGWE, MALAWI-JULY 2008: Scenes from the Kanengo Silo storage and packaging facility in the  capital Lilongwe, Malawi, 14 July 2008. Malawi has made a remarkable turnaround in its agricultural production in the last two years, going from a nation facing starvation to using new methods of cultivation to become the biggest producer in the region. (photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 LILONGWE, MALAWI-JULY 2008: Scenes from the Kanengo Silo storage and packaging facility in the  capital Lilongwe, Malawi, 14 July 2008. Malawi has made a remarkable turnaround in its agricultural production in the last two years, going from a nation facing starvation to using new methods of cultivation to become the biggest producer in the region. (photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 LILONGWE, MALAWI-JULY 2008: Scenes from the Kanengo Silo storage and packaging facility in the  capital Lilongwe, Malawi, 14 July 2008. Malawi has made a remarkable turnaround in its agricultural production in the last two years, going from a nation facing starvation to using new methods of cultivation to become the biggest producer in the region. (photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 LILONGWE, MALAWI-JULY 2008: Scenes from the Kanengo Silo storage and packaging facility in the  capital Lilongwe, Malawi, 14 July 2008. Malawi has made a remarkable turnaround in its agricultural production in the last two years, going from a nation facing starvation to using new methods of cultivation to become the biggest producer in the region. (photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 KASUNGO, MALAWI-JULY 2008: A therapeutic feeding centre for malnourished children run by World Food Program in Kasungo, Malawi, 14 July 2008. (photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
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 ST LOUIS, MISSOURI, MAY 2009: Images of Monsanto agribusiness greenhouses on top of a research building in St Louis, Missouri, 21 May 2009. Monsanto is at the forefront of biotechnology in the agribusiness sector and these greenhouses are housing the corn, soy bean and cotton of the future. All the plants in the Greenhouses have been carefully selected and cross-bred for their elite DNA qualities and are being grown as the crop of the future. It is estimated that these plants will produce seeds which are likely to see actual agricultural production in five to eight years time. (Photograph by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 ST LOUIS, MISSOURI, MAY 2009: Images of advanced seed chipping machines and their technicans inside Monsanto agribusiness headquarters in St Louis, Missouri, 21 May 2009. Monsanto is at the forefront of biotechnology in the agribusiness sector. These machines are designed and built inhouse and they allow the technicans to chip off a tiny portion of thousands of seeds daily. These chips are scanned instantly for the perfect DNA of an elite corn seed and then those seeds that make the grade are forwarded to the next stage of the selection process. Monsanto is a controversial global corporate with a history of strong litigation against those it assumes are interfering with its stringent patent laws. This practise as well as its advanced genetically modified technology approach in the agricultural sector have led many to be suspicious of Monsanto and the ultimate good of GM foods. Monsanto argues back that sufficent food production for the future is simply not possible without adequate GM technology in agriculture. (Photograph by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 ST LOUIS, MISSOURI, MAY 2009: Research Biologist Heidi Windler takes tissue samples from genetically modified corn plants inside a climate chamber housed in Monsanto agribusiness headquarters in St Louis, Missouri, 21 May 2009. Windler is attempting to breed a Corn Root Worm resistant strain of corn which will one day form the basis of a root worm resistant corn crop of the future. Monsanto is at the forefront of biotechnology in the agribusiness sector. These climate chambers are designed and built inhouse and they allow the technicans to monitor plant growth daily. These plants are monitored for the perfect DNA of an elite corn seed and then those plants that make the grade are forwarded to the next stage of the selection process. Monsanto is a controversial global corporate with a history of strong litigation against those it assumes are interfering with its stringent patent laws. This practise as well as its advanced genetically modified technology approach in the agricultural sector have led many to be suspicious of Monsanto and the ultimate good of GM foods. Monsanto argues back that sufficent food production for the future is simply not possible without adequate GM technology in agriculture. (Photograph by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 ST LOUIS, MISSOURI, MAY 2009: Plant Specialist Dustin McMahon hand pollinates genetically modified corn plants inside greenhouses housed on the roof of  Monsanto agribusiness headquarters in St Louis, Missouri, 21 May 2009.  McMahon is attempting to breed a resistant strain of corn which will one day form the basis of an elite corn crop of the future. Monsanto is at the forefront of biotechnology in the agribusiness sector. These greenhouses are designed and built inhouse and they allow the technicans to monitor plant growth daily. These plants are monitored for the perfect DNA of an elite corn seed and then those plants that make the grade are forwarded to the next stage of the selection process. Monsanto is a controversial global corporate with a history of strong litigation against those it assumes are interfering with its stringent patent laws. This practise as well as its advanced genetically modified technology approach in the agricultural sector have led many to be suspicious of Monsanto and the ultimate good of GM foods. Monsanto argues back that sufficent food production for the future is simply not possible without adequate GM technology in agriculture. (Photograph by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

KURIGRAM, BANGLADESH-AUGUST 2008: Flood affected village men hack away the embankment left by the most recent flooding in the area where their village used to be, Kurigram, Northern Bangladesh, 2 August 2008. They are doing this on the orders of the local landowner who is using this earth for contruction in another area. These men are effectively further removing the only barrier between them and further flooding but desperately need the small amount they are paid so do the work anyway. The lack of a serious engineering works aimed at flood prevention in Bangladesh is behind the suffering of millions of impoverished rural people. Annual predicable floods bring misery to millions without any effective counter plan. A fatalistic nations chooses instead to move rather than try to combat the flooding through engineering ingenuity. Flooding, Poverty and lack of protected land ownership amongst the poor is driving a serious food crisis in Bangladesh. A male labourers makes around 90 US cents a day while a women makes around 50 US cents a day working in the fields. Extreme poverty and rising food prices couple with an oversupply of cheap labour has meant that many people can only afford to eat once a day. Many labourers sell their services up to a year ahead and have been caught out by rampant food prices which are beyond the reach of their wages. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. The price of food staples have doubled in the last 5 months and civil unrest is a possibility in the near future. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, and a loss of government subsidies for food staples combined with the world's highest flood plain has meant that many people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

DHAKA, BANGLADESH - JULY 2008: Images of poor slum dwellers in Dhaka, Bangladesh on 31 July 2008. Many slum dwelling mothers are malnourished due to rsing food prices and they pass on this condition through inadequate nutrients in breast milk. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, and a loss of government subsidies for food staples has meant that many people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

KURIGRAM, BANGLADESH-AUGUST 2008: The distribution of fortified Atta to Vulnerable Groups in Kurigram, Northern Bangladesh, 2 August 2008. These women and their families are victims of severe flooding and have lost access to food and earning power. 347 of these families qualify in this district for food aid but there are 8000 families in total. Severe flooding affect millions of people every year in Bangladesh which has the highest flood plain in the world. This creates the "Monga Period" a lean time which occurs every year in Bangladesh. Poverty and lack of land ownership amongst the poor is driving a serious food crisis in Bangladesh. A male labourers makes around 90 US cents a day while a women makes around 50 US cents a day working in the fields. Extreme poverty and rising food prices couple with an oversupply of cheap labour has meant that many people can only afford to eat once a day. Many labourers sell their services up to a year ahead and have been caught out by rampant food prices which are beyond the reach of their wages. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. The price of food staples have doubled in the last 5 months and civil unrest is a possibility in the near future. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, and a loss of government subsidies for food staples combined with the world's highest flood plain has meant that many people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

DHAKA, BANGLADESH - JULY 2008: Images of slum dwelling mothers who are struggling to provide sufficent nutrition for their babies in Dhaka, Bangladesh on 31 July 2008. Many slum dwelling mothers are malnourished due to rsing food prices and they pass on this condition through inadequate nutrients in breast milk. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, and a loss of government subsidies for food staples has meant that many people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

KURIGRAM, BANGLADESH-AUGUST 2008: The distribution of fortified Atta to Vulnerable Groups in Kurigram, Northern Bangladesh, 2 August 2008. These women and their families are victims of severe flooding and have lost access to food and earning power. 347 of these families qualify in this district for food aid but there are 8000 families in total. Severe flooding affect millions of people every year in Bangladesh which has the highest flood plain in the world. This creates the "Monga Period" a lean time which occurs every year in Bangladesh. Poverty and lack of land ownership amongst the poor is driving a serious food crisis in Bangladesh. A male labourers makes around 90 US cents a day while a women makes around 50 US cents a day working in the fields. Extreme poverty and rising food prices couple with an oversupply of cheap labour has meant that many people can only afford to eat once a day. Many labourers sell their services up to a year ahead and have been caught out by rampant food prices which are beyond the reach of their wages. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. The price of food staples have doubled in the last 5 months and civil unrest is a possibility in the near future. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, and a loss of government subsidies for food staples combined with the world's highest flood plain has meant that many people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

RANGPUR, NORTHERN BANGLADESH - JULY 2008: An impoverished farmer in rural Rangpur, Bangladesh on 2 August 2008. This farmer is a labourer on rice growing land. During his lunch break he takes a break from planting to try to catch small fish. These he sells in the market in the evening. This allows him to buy his family one full meal a day. A great deal of rural labour is sourced a year ahead by landowners. A small fee is agreed but because of the recent massive rise in food costs the very poor can no longer afford food on the agreed salaries. The price of rice has more than doubled in the last five months. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, a loss of government subsidies for food staples and subsequent price increases from merchant stockpiling has meant that many poor people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

KAZALDANGA, BANGLADESH-AUGUST 2008: Flood affected villagers eke out a living with the help of BRAC and WFP, Kazaldanga, Northern Bangladesh, 2 August 2008. Flooding, Poverty and lack of protected land ownership amongst the poor is driving a serious food crisis in Bangladesh. A male labourers makes around 90 US cents a day while a women makes around 50 US cents a day working in the fields. Extreme poverty and rising food prices couple with an oversupply of cheap labour has meant that many people can only afford to eat once a day. Many labourers sell their services up to a year ahead and have been caught out by rampant food prices which are beyond the reach of their wages. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. The price of food staples have doubled in the last 5 months and civil unrest is a possibility in the near future. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, and a loss of government subsidies for food staples combined with the world's highest flood plain has meant that many people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

GAIBANDAH, BANGLADESH-AUGUST 2008: Vulnerable farmers on flood damaged islands work to clear rice fields damaged by annual floods which destroy crops and homes amongst the poor on a yearly basis, Gaibandah, Bangladesh, 2 August 2008. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. The price of food staples have doubled in the last 5 months and civil unrest is a possibility in the near future. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, and a loss of government subsidies for food staples combined with the world's highest flood plain has meant that many people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

KURIGAM, BANGLADESH-AUGUST 2008: Children at school receive World Food Program biscuits containing 14 essential vitamins and minerals In Kurigam, Northern Bangladesh, 2 August 2008. As a result of dire poverty and rising food prices for many of these children this is often their only meal of the day. Over 17 tons of these biscuits are distributed daily in the district and over 400 tons are distributed monthly. As a result schood attendance is now at 99% as opposed to the previous 64%. The biscuit program has also seen less children involved in child labor programs as they can now be fed at school as opposed to having to earn their food through work. Poverty and lack of land ownership amongst the poor is driving a serious food crisis in Bangladesh. A male labourers makes around 90 US cents a day while a women makes around 50 US cents a day working in these fields. Extreme poverty and rising food prices couple with an oversupply of cheap labour has meant that many people can only afford to eat once a day. Many labourers sell their services up to a year ahead and have been caught out by rampant food prices which are beyond the reach of their wages. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. The price of food staples have doubled in the last 5 months and civil unrest is a possibility in the near future. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, and a loss of government subsidies for food staples combined with the world's highest flood plain has meant that many people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

KURIGAM, BANGLADESH-AUGUST 2008: Children at school receive World Food Program biscuits containing 14 essential vitamins and minerals In Kurigam, Northern Bangladesh, 2 August 2008. As a result of dire poverty and rising food prices for many of these children this is often their only meal of the day. Over 17 tons of these biscuits are distributed daily in the district and over 400 tons are distributed monthly. As a result schood attendance is now at 99% as opposed to the previous 64%. The biscuit program has also seen less children involved in child labor programs as they can now be fed at school as opposed to having to earn their food through work. Poverty and lack of land ownership amongst the poor is driving a serious food crisis in Bangladesh. A male labourers makes around 90 US cents a day while a women makes around 50 US cents a day working in these fields. Extreme poverty and rising food prices couple with an oversupply of cheap labour has meant that many people can only afford to eat once a day. Many labourers sell their services up to a year ahead and have been caught out by rampant food prices which are beyond the reach of their wages. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. The price of food staples have doubled in the last 5 months and civil unrest is a possibility in the near future. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, and a loss of government subsidies for food staples combined with the world's highest flood plain has meant that many people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

KURIGAM, BANGLADESH-AUGUST 2008: Children at school receive World Food Program biscuits containing 14 essential vitamins and minerals In Kurigam, Northern Bangladesh, 2 August 2008. As a result of dire poverty and rising food prices for many of these children this is often their only meal of the day. Over 17 tons of these biscuits are distributed daily in the district and over 400 tons are distributed monthly. As a result schood attendance is now at 99% as opposed to the previous 64%. The biscuit program has also seen less children involved in child labor programs as they can now be fed at school as opposed to having to earn their food through work. Poverty and lack of land ownership amongst the poor is driving a serious food crisis in Bangladesh. A male labourers makes around 90 US cents a day while a women makes around 50 US cents a day working in these fields. Extreme poverty and rising food prices couple with an oversupply of cheap labour has meant that many people can only afford to eat once a day. Many labourers sell their services up to a year ahead and have been caught out by rampant food prices which are beyond the reach of their wages. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. The price of food staples have doubled in the last 5 months and civil unrest is a possibility in the near future. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, and a loss of government subsidies for food staples combined with the world's highest flood plain has meant that many people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

KURIGAM, BANGLADESH-AUGUST 2008: Children at school receive World Food Program biscuits containing 14 essential vitamins and minerals In Kurigam, Northern Bangladesh, 2 August 2008. As a result of dire poverty and rising food prices for many of these children this is often their only meal of the day. Over 17 tons of these biscuits are distributed daily in the district and over 400 tons are distributed monthly. As a result schood attendance is now at 99% as opposed to the previous 64%. The biscuit program has also seen less children involved in child labor programs as they can now be fed at school as opposed to having to earn their food through work. Poverty and lack of land ownership amongst the poor is driving a serious food crisis in Bangladesh. A male labourers makes around 90 US cents a day while a women makes around 50 US cents a day working in these fields. Extreme poverty and rising food prices couple with an oversupply of cheap labour has meant that many people can only afford to eat once a day. Many labourers sell their services up to a year ahead and have been caught out by rampant food prices which are beyond the reach of their wages. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. The price of food staples have doubled in the last 5 months and civil unrest is a possibility in the near future. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, and a loss of government subsidies for food staples combined with the world's highest flood plain has meant that many people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

RANGPUR, NORTHERN BANGLADESH - JULY 2008: Labourers work in the testing fields planting and harvesting experimental rice varieties at the RDRS Hybrid Rice Growing Project in rural Rangpur, Bangladesh, 2 August 2008. This project has successfully developed a new strain of rice that can be grown inbetween the traditional periods where rice is grown. The rice can also be chopped off at the base and will then regrown unlike traditional strains which makes replanting unneccesary. It is also hardier and can grow in less perfect conditions than traditional rice. This RDRS Hybrid project makes the point that there is inadequate production for the population of Bangladesh and is attempting to address that. The price of rice has more than doubled in the last five months. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, a loss of government subsidies for food staples and subsequent price increases from merchant stockpiling has meant that many poor people are down to one meal a day. An additional crop a year would bring much needed relief as well as the possibility of moving beyond food security into a cash crop for many poor farmers. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

RANGPUR, NORTHERN BANGLADESH - JULY 2008: Labourers work in the testing fields planting and harvesting experimental rice varieties at the RDRS Hybrid Rice Growing Project in rural Rangpur, Bangladesh, 2 August 2008. This project has successfully developed a new strain of rice that can be grown inbetween the traditional periods where rice is grown. The rice can also be chopped off at the base and will then regrown unlike traditional strains which makes replanting unneccesary. It is also hardier and can grow in less perfect conditions than traditional rice. This RDRS Hybrid project makes the point that there is inadequate production for the population of Bangladesh and is attempting to address that. The price of rice has more than doubled in the last five months. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, a loss of government subsidies for food staples and subsequent price increases from merchant stockpiling has meant that many poor people are down to one meal a day. An additional crop a year would bring much needed relief as well as the possibility of moving beyond food security into a cash crop for many poor farmers. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

GAIBANDAH, BANGLADESH-AUGUST 2008: Laborers at work in Rice fields in Gaibandah, Northern Bangladesh, 2 August 2008. Poverty and lack of land ownership amongst the poor is driving a serious food crisis in Bangladesh. A male labourers makes around 90 US cents a day while a women makes around 50 US cents a day working in these fields. Extreme poverty and rising food prices couple with an oversupply of cheap labour has meant that many people can only afford to eat once a day. Many labourers sell their services up to a year ahead and have been caught out by rampant food prices which are beyond the reach of their wages. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. The price of food staples have doubled in the last 5 months and civil unrest is a possibility in the near future. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, and a loss of government subsidies for food staples combined with the world's highest flood plain has meant that many people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

RANGPUR, BANGLADESH-AUGUST 2008: An Atta production factory run by World Food Program in Rangpur, Northern Bangladesh, 2 August 2008. This food is distributed to vulnerable groups who are not able to support themselves and can no longer afford food. Flooding, Poverty and lack of protected land ownership amongst the poor is driving a serious food crisis in Bangladesh. A male labourer makes around 90 US cents a day while a women makes around 50 US cents a day working in the fields. Extreme poverty and rising food prices couple with an oversupply of cheap labour has meant that many people can only afford to eat once a day. Many labourers sell their services up to a year ahead and have been caught out by rampant food prices which are beyond the reach of their wages. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. The price of food staples have doubled in the last 5 months and civil unrest is a possibility in the near future. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, and a loss of government subsidies for food staples combined with the world's highest flood plain has meant that many people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

GAIBANDAH, BANGLADESH-AUGUST 2008: Vulnerable farmers work as day labourers for menial wages in rice fields near to Gaibandah, Northern Bangladesh, 2 August 2008. Poverty and lack of land ownership amongst the poor is driving a serious food crisis in Bangladesh. A male labourers makes around 90 US cents a day while a women makes around 50 US cents a day working in these fields. Extreme poverty and rising food prices couple with an oversupply of cheap labour has meant that many people can only afford to eat once a day. Many labourers sell their services up to a year ahead and have been caught out by rampant food prices which are beyond the reach of their wages. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. The price of food staples have doubled in the last 5 months and civil unrest is a possibility in the near future. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, and a loss of government subsidies for food staples combined with the world's highest flood plain has meant that many people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

GAIBANDAH, BANGLADESH-AUGUST 2008: Rice fields in Gaibandah, Northern Bangladesh, 2 August 2008. Poverty and lack of land ownership amongst the poor is driving a serious food crisis in Bangladesh. A male labourers makes around 90 US cents a day while a women makes around 50 US cents a day working in these fields. Extreme poverty and rising food prices couple with an oversupply of cheap labour has meant that many people can only afford to eat once a day. Many labourers sell their services up to a year ahead and have been caught out by rampant food prices which are beyond the reach of their wages. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. The price of food staples have doubled in the last 5 months and civil unrest is a possibility in the near future. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, and a loss of government subsidies for food staples combined with the world's highest flood plain has meant that many people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

GAIBANDAH, BANGLADESH-AUGUST 2008: Female labourers at work in Rice fields in Gaibandah, Northern Bangladesh, 2 August 2008. Poverty and lack of land ownership amongst the poor is driving a serious food crisis in Bangladesh. A male labourers makes around 90 US cents a day while a women makes around 50 US cents a day working in these fields. Extreme poverty and rising food prices couple with an oversupply of cheap labour has meant that many people can only afford to eat once a day. Many labourers sell their services up to a year ahead and have been caught out by rampant food prices which are beyond the reach of their wages. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. The price of food staples have doubled in the last 5 months and civil unrest is a possibility in the near future. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, and a loss of government subsidies for food staples combined with the world's highest flood plain has meant that many people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

GAIBANDAH, BANGLADESH-AUGUST 2008: Vulnerable farmers work as day labourers for menial wages in rice fields near to Gaibandah, Northern Bangladesh, 2 August 2008. Poverty and lack of land ownership amongst the poor is driving a serious food crisis in Bangladesh. A male labourers makes around 90 US cents a day while a women makes around 50 US cents a day working in these fields. Extreme poverty and rising food prices couple with an oversupply of cheap labour has meant that many people can only afford to eat once a day. Many labourers sell their services up to a year ahead and have been caught out by rampant food prices which are beyond the reach of their wages. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. The price of food staples have doubled in the last 5 months and civil unrest is a possibility in the near future. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, and a loss of government subsidies for food staples combined with the world's highest flood plain has meant that many people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

GAIBANDAH, BANGLADESH-AUGUST 2008: Vulnerable farmers work as day labourers for menial wages in rice fields near to Gaibandah, Northern Bangladesh, 2 August 2008. Poverty and lack of land ownership amongst the poor is driving a serious food crisis in Bangladesh. A male labourers makes around 90 US cents a day while a women makes around 50 US cents a day working in these fields. Extreme poverty and rising food prices couple with an oversupply of cheap labour has meant that many people can only afford to eat once a day. Many labourers sell their services up to a year ahead and have been caught out by rampant food prices which are beyond the reach of their wages. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. The price of food staples have doubled in the last 5 months and civil unrest is a possibility in the near future. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, and a loss of government subsidies for food staples combined with the world's highest flood plain has meant that many people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

DHAKA, BANGLADESH - JULY 2008: Food market scenes in Dhaka, Bangladesh on 31 July 2008. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, and a loss of government subsidies for food staples has meant that many people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

DHAKA, BANGLADESH - JULY 2008: Scenes from food markets in Dhaka, Bangladesh on 31 July 2008. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. Rising world energy prices, one of the worlds poorest populations, and a loss of government subsidies for food staples has meant that many people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

DHAKA, BANGLADESH - JULY 2008: Scenes from food markets in Dhaka, Bangladesh on 31 July 2008. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. Rising world energy prices, one of the worlds poorest populations, and a loss of government subsidies for food staples has meant that many people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

DHAKA, BANGLADESH - JULY 2008: A young Rickshaw Puller eats his single meal of the day in an impoverished slum area of Dhaka, Bangladesh on 31 July 2008. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, a loss of government subsidies for food staples and subsequent price increases from merchant stockpiling has meant that many poor people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

RANGPUR, BANGLADESH-AUGUST 2008: A seed and fertilizer dealer in Rangpur, Northern Bangladesh, 2 August 2008. It is hoped that hybrid techniques and fertilizers will help farmers to provide greater yielding crops in the face of a looming food crisis. Flooding, Poverty and lack of protected land ownership amongst the poor is driving a serious food crisis in Bangladesh. A male labourers makes around 90 US cents a day while a women makes around 50 US cents a day working in the fields. Extreme poverty and rising food prices couple with an oversupply of cheap labour has meant that many people can only afford to eat once a day. Many labourers sell their services up to a year ahead and have been caught out by rampant food prices which are beyond the reach of their wages. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. The price of food staples have doubled in the last 5 months and civil unrest is a possibility in the near future. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, and a loss of government subsidies for food staples combined with the world's highest flood plain has meant that many people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

DHAKA, BANGLADESH - JULY 2008: Scenes at a rice warehouse in Dhaka, Bangladesh on 31 July 2008. The young girls sweep up spilt rice all day and in exchange they are given a kilo and a half of rice to take home. In many cases these young children are responsible for the main family meal. Rice has tripled in price over the last year devastating poor families in Bangladesh. This is a result of food insecurity and resultant market speculation, natural disaster affecting crop yields, rising energy costs affecting food prices and the loss of a government subsidy for cheap staple foods for the poor. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. This has left many thousands of families surviving on one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

DHAKA, BANGLADESH - JULY 2008: Scenes at a rice warehouse in Dhaka, Bangladesh on 31 July 2008. The young girls sweep up spilt rice all day and in exchange they are given a kilo and a half of rice to take home. In many cases these young children are responsible for the main family meal. Rice has tripled in price over the last year devastating poor families in Bangladesh. This is a result of food insecurity and resultant market speculation, natural disaster affecting crop yields, rising energy costs affecting food prices and the loss of a government subsidy for cheap staple foods for the poor. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. This has left many thousands of families surviving on one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

DHAKA, BANGLADESH - JULY 2008: Panna Kalam,7, is the daughter of poor slum dwellers in Dhaka, Bangladesh on 31 July 2008. She spends her day searching through food markets for whatever scraps she can find on the floor and in the garbage. Her father is ill and her mother is busy with the other children. Panna and her scavenging is the only support for her family. Due to the huge rise in food prices they are more dependant on her than ever. Despite this, she remains a bouyant and optimistic little girl who undertakes her job with great pride. Many slum dwelling mothers are malnourished due to rsing food prices and they pass on this condition through inadequate nutrients in breast milk or being unable to feed their children properly. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, and a loss of government subsidies for food staples has meant that many people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

DHAKA, BANGLADESH - JULY 2008: Panna Kalam,7, is the daughter of poor slum dwellers in Dhaka, Bangladesh on 31 July 2008. She spends her day searching through food markets for whatever scraps she can find on the floor and in the garbage. Her father is ill and her mother is busy with the other children. Panna and her scavenging is the only support for her family. Due to the huge rise in food prices they are more dependant on her than ever. Despite this, she remains a bouyant and optimistic little girl who undertakes her job with great pride. Many slum dwelling mothers are malnourished due to rsing food prices and they pass on this condition through inadequate nutrients in breast milk or being unable to feed their children properly. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, and a loss of government subsidies for food staples has meant that many people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

DHAKA, BANGLADESH - JULY 2008: Panna Kalam,7, is the daughter of poor slum dwellers in Dhaka, Bangladesh on 31 July 2008. She spends her day searching through food markets for whatever scraps she can find on the floor and in the garbage. Her father is ill and her mother is busy with the other children. Panna and her scavenging is the only support for her family. Due to the huge rise in food prices they are more dependant on her than ever. Despite this, she remains a bouyant and optimistic little girl who undertakes her job with great pride. Many slum dwelling mothers are malnourished due to rsing food prices and they pass on this condition through inadequate nutrients in breast milk or being unable to feed their children properly. Bangladesh is one of the worst affected countries in terms of food security. Rising world energy prices, one of the world's poorest populations, and a loss of government subsidies for food staples has meant that many people are down to one meal a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

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RIFT VALLEY PROVINCE, KENYA, NOVEMBER 2009: Images of a massacre site where the Pokot tribesman came out of the Rift Valley, their traditional area, and attacked a Samburu village over cattle grazing rights in the north of Kenya at a time of the worst drought in the region for the last 100 years, 20 November 2009. 25 Samburu men, women and children were killed in the attack, over 50 cattle were shot and over 300 died later in the week from not being able to access grazing land because of the threat of the Pokot. The drought has brought about increasingly deadly conflict between pastoralists as well as conservationists all competing for grazing land. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage by Getty Images.)

RIFT VALLEY PROVINCE, KENYA, NOVEMBER 2009: Samburu pastoralists drain blood to mix with milk from an emaciated cow in Samburu National Park in the north of Kenya at a time of the worst drought in Kenya for the last 100 years, 20 November 2009. These cattle are the last remaining of a herd of 300 which have succumbed to the worst drought to hit Kenya in over 100 years. Many Samburu now face starvation as a result of their decimated herds being unable to supply a steady food supply for communities. Tensions are high as pastoralists tribes as well as conservationists are all competing for tiny pockets of grazing land. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage by Getty Images.)

KOYA, MARSABIT SOUTH, NORTH KENYA: Rendille Morans dig water for goats and camels in an area designated as sustainable by the Melako Conservancy comittee, Koya, North Kenya, 28 February 2010. The Melako Conservancy is run by the local community with advice from the Northern Rangeland Trust, an NGO which seeks to advise communities on sustainable pastoral practises and ways to leverage wildlife for conservancy and income purposes. In this area they have been instrumental in advising the locals how to graze cattle sustainably in a controlled pattern and keep them out of sensitive wildlife areas so that they can build viable tourism from which the community derives an annual guaranteed income. (Photo by Brent Stirton/ Reportage by Getty Images.)

CAMEROON, JULY 2010: Local people with bushmeat sold and purchased all along the logging roads of Cameroon, this is not an illegal activity at this time but as logging creates roads and towns the pressure on bushmeat is rapidly becoming unsustainable and unless controlled may lead to the rapid eradication of most forest creatures, Cameroon, June 6, 2010. The Congo Basin forests cover an area the combined size of France and South Africa. The forests of Cameroon form a large part of this basin. Still relatively intact and connected, these forest ecosystems and freshwater systems are home to abundant wildlife and provide food, shelter, clean water and protection against floods to more than 75 million people. The economic value of these systems is enormous. Timber alone is worth several Billion Euros annually to the Forest industry, while minerals are also being heavily exploited. The importance of the Congo Basin as a global, natural reservoir to store Carbon is also massive. CO2 emissions from deforestation of this region could be devastating for agriculture and water resources. The challenges for Cameroon are enormous. If social and economic development needs are to be met, then development will have to be sustainable. As such a number of key threats will have to be addressed: 1. Unsustainable Timber exploitation – as much 50% of all timber from the region is believed to be illegal. This represents 10-15 billion Euros annually.2. Major Infrastructure Development – this is linked to the increasing exploitation of logging, mining and oil exploration as well as potential dam building. 3. Unsustainable levels of bush meat hunting – population increase, bush roads, trucking to and from remote areas all lead to increased food pressures.4. Growing human Populations – increased cultivation of food within forests.5. Weak governance and rule of law – corruption and inequitable division of profits derived from the forests. The answers: 1. Sustainable Forest managemen

NYABISSAM, CAMEROON, JULY 2011: A woman prepares a porcupine for the pot in a small Cameroonian village close to to Nyabissam, July 27, 2011. This woman risks the transmission of animal disease pathogens to her own body during the bloody preparation process. Any cuts on her hands or arms could see a transmission of disease from the animal to her, a fact that many consumers of bushmeat are unaware. Dr Nathan D. Wolfe, an American virologist who is the Director of the Global Viral Forecasting Initiative and the Lorry I. Lokey Visiting Professor in Human Biology at Stanford University. Dr. Wolfe spent over eight years conducting biomedical research in both sub-Saharan Africa and Southeast Asia. In 2007, he founded the Global Viral Forecasting Initiative with the goal of developing an early warning system for pandemics to monitor the transmission of infectious diseases from animals to humans. The initiative currently coordinates a staff of over 100 scientists in China, Cameroon, Equatorial Guinea, DR Congo, PR Congo, Lao, Gabon, Central African Republic, Malaysia, Madagascar and Sao Tome. He also directs Global Viral Forecasting Inc. which offers both governmental and corporate services for biological threat evaluation and management. He works with local hunters in the forests of Cameroon. Wolfe has a long history with these small animal hunters with whom he collaborates in obtaining vital blood samples to monitor emerging Pathogens which may be harmful to both humans and wildlife. Small mammals can be reservoirs for new and emerging infectious diseases. The most famous example of this is the the HIV Virus which emerged from Chimp DNA which combined with that of the monkeys the Chimps ate. Blood to blood contact between Chimps hunted for food and human's who becames infected through contact with infected chimps. Wolfe's mission is to guard the frontline of infectious disease, searching for the next pandemic, serving the frontline in the war against the next super-virus.

LAKE TURKANA, NORTHERN KENYA, MAY 2010: Dasenetch pastoralist people with their catch of Tilapia fish in Lake Turkana in North Kenya, 20 May 2010. Fishing is a relatively new phenomenon for the Dasenetch, drought and climate change have forced them to look further than cattle for alternative sources of sustenance and economy. Fishing has become the primary means in the Lake Turkana region but has yet to reach any real commercial significance. The lake is the largest desert lake in the world and sustains both Turkana and Dasenetch people as well as Gabra and other tribes in the region. Lake Turkana faces an uncertain future however as the Gibe 3 dam project in Ethiopia, a massive hydro-electric scheme and Ethiopia's biggest single investment, comes on line. The dam project, designed to create electricity for sale to surrounding countries including Kenya, will reduce the flow of the Omo river dramatically and this river is the main feeder river for Lake Turkana. Significant changes in lake levels and in ecology can be expected as a result. Fertile flood plain invaluable for agriculture will also be negatively impacted. All of this bodes badly for the pastoralists of the Lake Turkana and Southern Ethiopia's Omo river region, these groups are already under severe subsistence pressure and there is a long history of armed conflict in the region. Weapons flow in to this region through Sudan and Somalia and there is little control over this trade which looks likely to accelerate if pressures increase in this region. At this time the Dam project has full support from Kenya's Nairobi government, despite the fact that there has been no Environmental Impact Asssesment produced for this scheme. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage by Getty Images.)

BUNGOMA, KENYA - 13 SEPTEMBER: Images of Dominion Farm, the largest private American investment in Kenya, September 13, 2007 in Bungoma, Kenya. The farm's owners are staunch Christians but unlike most evangelical movements who come to Africa they do not wish to provide traditional aid, they wish to uplift the people via good sustainable realistic business sense. The farm specialises in massive Fish breeding and massive Rice production and has resisted protest and corruption on their way to success. They believe in the business potential of Africa and Africans and express disapointment at the lack of American business investment in Africa. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

KISUMU, KENYA - 10 SEPTEMBER: Images of a subsidised bee-keeper at work in the Sauri Millenium village, September 10, 2007 in Kisumu, Kenya. The pictures illustrate succesful production based on five years of initial structured financing of rural communities which allows small farmers to reach sustainability and the ability to support themselves. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

BUNGOMA, KENYA - 11 SEPTEMBER: Images of trials for maize growing with different varieties of seed, September 11, 2007 in Bungoma, Kenya. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

Nairobi, Kenya - 9 September: Akinwumi Adesina, associate director of Food Security for the Rockefeller Foundation and winner of the Yara Prize 2007, a major award for his role in advancing the African green revolution, September 9, 2007 in Nairobi, Kenya. Adesina evolved a system for implementing vastly more efficent farming methods and access to fertilisers for African nations.(Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

BUNGOMA, KENYA - 11 SEPTEMBER: Images of students and teachers at Sacred Africa agricultural college, September 11, 2007 in Bungoma, Kenya. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

KISUMU, KENYA - 10 SEPTEMBER: Images of a female agro-dealer in the market places of the Sauri Millenium village, September 10, 2007 in Kisumu, Kenya. The pictures illustrate succesful production based on five years of initial structured financing of rural communities which allows small farmers to reach sustainability and the ability to support themselves. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

BUNGOMA, KENYA - 11 SEPTEMBER: Images at KACE market information point where local farmers can use information and cell phones to stay informed on market prices throughout the region, September 11, 2007 in Bungoma, Kenya. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

BUNGOMA, KENYA - 11 SEPTEMBER: Images of SACRED cereal bank and co-operative members at work, September 11, 2008 in Bungoma, Kenya. These cereal banks function as security for many of the farmers in this region. The corn is stored as capital which allows them to pay for thing s like medicine and education for their children and also to aquire micro-loans for business expansion.(Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

TABORA, TANZANIA, AUGUST 2007: Succesful crop harvesting in Tabora, Tanzania, 27 August 2008. Small financing and agricultural education from WWF and the Millenium Village foundation have subsequently enabled farmers in this part of Tanzania to develop land for crop production far more efficently than before thereby guaranteeing food security and a better life for local people. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage by Getty Images.)

KISUMU, KENYA - 11 SEPTEMBER: The secretary of a local newly- formed farmer's group in the Sauri Millenium village locale, September 11, 2007 in Kisumu, Kenya. He stands with his maize crop which will soon be pooled with the other farmers as they seek to reinforce each others efforts. The Millenium Village concept is based on succesful production based on five years of initial structured financing of rural communities which allows small farmers to reach sustainability and the ability to support themselves. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

KISUMU, KENYA - 11 SEPTEMBER: A young mother and her child prepare lunch in their small hut in the Sauri Millenium village locale, September 11, 2007 in Kisumu, Kenya. The Millenium Village concept is based on succesful production based on five years of initial structured financing of rural communities which allows small farmers to reach sustainability and the ability to support themselves. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

KISUMU, KENYA - 11 SEPTEMBER: A rural woman and her children prepare for bed underneath donated repellent-impregnated mosqito netting in the Sauri Millenium village locale, September 11, 2007 in Kisumu, Kenya. Malaria rates in the area have dropped by over 400% as a result of the donated netting, freeing farmers of disease and making for a more productive populace. The Millenium Village concept is based on succesful production based on five years of initial structured financing of rural communities which allows small farmers to reach sustainability and the ability to support themselves. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

BUNGOMA, KENYA - 13 SEPTEMBER: Images of HoneyCare projects for receiving, manufacturing, processing and delivery of honey by rural farmers, September 11, 2007 in Bungoma, Kenya. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

KISUMU, KENYA - 10 SEPTEMBER: Images of diverse agricultural production and farming in the Sauri Millenium village, September 10, 2007 in Kisumu, Kenya. The pictures illustrate succesful production based on five years of initial structured financing of rural communities which allows small farmers to reach sustainability and the ability to support themselves. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

TABORA, TANZANIA, AUGUST 2007: A Tanzanian woman runs a small business selling small food parcels which she buys in bulk at a Millenium Village sponsored village in Tabora, Tanzania, 27 August 2008. Small financing and agricultural education from WWF and the Millenium Village foundation have subsequently enabled farmers in this part of Tanzania to develop land for crop production far more efficently than before thereby guaranteeing food security and a better life for local people. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage by Getty Images.)

BUNGOMA, KENYA - 13 SEPTEMBER: Images of HoneyCare projects for receiving, manufacturing, processing and delivery of honey by rural farmers, September 11, 2007 in Bungoma, Kenya. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

ORNGAYANET, NAROK SOUTH, KENYA, FEBRUARY 2010: Pastoralist Masaai prepare a field of Maize in Orngayanet, Kenya, 22 February, 2010. Crop cultivation is a relatively new thing for the Masaai, and is a result of living next to other tribes who practise agricultural and have fared better than the Masaai with their cattle in times of drought and disease and shrinking grazing land. There are now large fields of maize under cultivation by the Masaai as some move from pastoralism towards a more stable means of income and subsistence. The main priorities of the Pastorilists around Kenya is access to medical treatment, education for their children and access to water for good grazing. The culture around cattle however means that selling them for money for these purposes is often a reluctant process. As land for grazing diminishes and drough and climate change and overpopulation loom, these practises will have to change if pastoralists are to move into a modern way of life. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage by Getty Images.)

KISUMU, KENYA - 10 SEPTEMBER: Images of diverse agricultural production and farming in the Sauri Millenium village, September 10, 2007 in Kisumu, Kenya. The pictures illustrate succesful production based on five years of initial structured financing of rural communities which allows small farmers to reach sustainability and the ability to support themselves. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

TABORA, TANZANIA, AUGUST 2007: Succesful crop harvesting in Tabora, Tanzania, 27 August 2008. Small financing and agricultural education from WWF and the Millenium Village foundation have subsequently enabled farmers in this part of Tanzania to develop land for crop production far more efficently than before thereby guaranteeing food security and a better life for local people. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage by Getty Images.)

TABORA, TANZANIA, AUGUST 2007: Succesful crop harvesting in Tabora, Tanzania, 27 August 2008. Small financing and agricultural education from WWF and the Millenium Village foundation have subsequently enabled farmers in this part of Tanzania to develop land for crop production far more efficently than before thereby guaranteeing food security and a better life for local people. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage by Getty Images.)

KISUMU, KENYA - 10 SEPTEMBER: Images of diverse agricultural production and farming in the Sauri Millenium village, September 10, 2007 in Kisumu, Kenya. The pictures illustrate succesful production based on five years of initial structured financing of rural communities which allows small farmers to reach sustainability and the ability to support themselves. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

NAIROBI, KENYA - 13 SEPTEMBER: Images of Promisador/Nutro grain and maize facility, September 13, 2007 in Nairobi, Kenya. This surplus will be shipped all over Africa for food aid and is possible because of new techniques in food production brought about by the Millenium Village concept of subsidy and education leading to self sustaing local enterprise. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

BUNGOMA, KENYA - 13 SEPTEMBER: Images of rice production in the factory on Dominion Farm, the largest private American investment in Kenya, September 13, 2007 in Bungoma, Kenya. The farm's owners are staunch Christians but unlike most evangelical movements who come to Africa they do not wish to provide traditional aid, they wish to uplift the people via good sustainable realistic business sense. The farm specialises in massive Fish breeding and massive Rice production and has resisted protest and corruption on their way to success. They believe in the business potential of Africa and Africans and express disapointment at the lack of American business investment in Africa. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

KISUMU, KENYA - 11 SEPTEMBER: Scenes from the Yara Market for local produce and goods in the Sauri Millenium village locale, September 11, 2007 in Kisumu, Kenya. The Millenium Village concept is based on succesful production based on five years of initial structured financing of rural communities which allows small farmers to reach sustainability and the ability to support themselves. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

KISUMU, KENYA - 13 SEPTEMBER: Images of local agricultural produce at the Jubilee market, September 13, 2007 in Kisumu, Kenya. The market is a new facility financed in conjunction with various NGO's. It provides a retail outlet for the farmers of the Millenium Village project who have benefitted from a short term loan subsidy and agricultural education. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

KISUMU, KENYA - 11 SEPTEMBER: Scenes from the Yara Market for local produce and goods in the Sauri Millenium village locale, September 11, 2007 in Kisumu, Kenya. The Millenium Village concept is based on succesful production based on five years of initial structured financing of rural communities which allows small farmers to reach sustainability and the ability to support themselves. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

NAIROBI, KENYA - 13 SEPTEMBER: Images of export packaging at the "Fresh and Juicy" warehouse facility, where organic produce from rural farmers supported by the Millenium Village project, is readied for export, September 13, 2007, Nairobi, Kenya. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

ZOMBA, MALAWI-JULY 2008: A poor farmer mixes home-made manure which has trebled his crop yield over the last 3 years, Zomba, Malawi, 17 July 2008. His cabbage fields and maize crop have allowed him to pay school fees for his children and build a new house. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

KASUNGO, MALAWI-JULY 2008: A rural village has taken its food security a step further by building a dam for rainwater and then using footpumps and watering cans to get the water to fields to grow maize, Kasungo, Malawi, 14 July 2008. (photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

KASUNGO, MALAWI-JULY 2008: A rural village has taken its food security a step further by building a dam for rainwater and then using footpumps and watering cans to get the water to fields to grow maize, Kasungo, Malawi, 14 July 2008. (photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

ZOMBA, MALAWI-JULY 2007: Patrick Khovima, 33, a poor farmer, has built a field irrigation system from a simple trench and plastic which he uses a leg pump to irrigate. He has trebled his crop yield over the last year as a result, Zomba, Malawi, 17 July 2007. He has built a better house, bught a sofa and tv and is saving for iron sheeting for the roof of his house. These techniques have allowed Malawi to turn around an agricultural nightmare into the biggest success in the region in only a 3 year period. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

ZOMBA, MALAWI-JULY 2008: A poor farmer's co-operative has built a field irrigation system from a simple trench and plastic which has trebled their crop yield over the last 3 years, Zomba, Malawi, 17 July 2008. New techniques with UNDP/Millenium Village expertise have allowed Malawi to turn around an agricultural nightmare into the biggest success in the region in only a 3 year period. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

ZOMBA, MALAWI-JULY 2007: Agricultural supply stores in Zomba, Malawi, 17 July 2007. Many farmers in Malawi credit their recent success to hybrid seeds and fertilizers which have in many cases more than doubled their crops and enabled them to produce a winter crop as well. (photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

ZOMBA, MALAWI-JULY 2008: A poor farmer holds home-made manure which has trebled his crop yield over the last 3 years, Zomba, Malawi, 17 July 2008. (photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

MZIMBA, MALAWI-JULY 2008: A farming community harvests corn in Mzimba, Malawi, 17 July 2008. This is a bumper year for Malawian farmers. Many farmers in Malawi credit their recent success to progessive agriculture which includes hybrid seeds and fertilizers which have in many cases more than doubled their crops and enabled them to produce a winter crop as well. This has enabled many farmers to escape food insecurity, build their own homes, buy bicycles and send their children to school with schoolfees. (photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

MZIMBA, MALAWI-JULY 2008: A farming community harvests corn in Mzimba, Malawi, 17 July 2008. This is a bumper year for Malawian farmers. Many farmers in Malawi credit their recent success to progessive agriculture which includes hybrid seeds and fertilizers which have in many cases more than doubled their crops and enabled them to produce a winter crop as well. This has enabled many farmers to escape food insecurity, build their own homes, buy bicycles and send their children to school with schoolfees. (photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

MZIMBA, MALAWI-JULY 2008: A farming community harvests corn in Mzimba, Malawi, 17 July 2008. This is a bumper year for Malawian farmers. Many farmers in Malawi credit their recent success to progessive agriculture which includes hybrid seeds and fertilizers which have in many cases more than doubled their crops and enabled them to produce a winter crop as well. This has enabled many farmers to escape food insecurity, build their own homes, buy bicycles and send their children to school with schoolfees. (photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

MZIMBA, MALAWI-JULY 2008: A farming community harvests corn in Mzimba, Malawi, 17 July 2008. This is a bumper year for Malawian farmers. Many farmers in Malawi credit their recent success to progessive agriculture which includes hybrid seeds and fertilizers which have in many cases more than doubled their crops and enabled them to produce a winter crop as well. This has enabled many farmers to escape food insecurity, build their own homes, buy bicycles and send their children to school with schoolfees. (photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

MZIMBA, MALAWI-JULY 2008: A Malawian farming family harvests corn in rural Mzimba, Malawi, 17 July 2008. This is a bumper year for Malawian farmers. Many farmers in Malawi credit their recent success to progessive agriculture which includes hybrid seeds and fertilizers which have in many cases more than doubled their crops and enabled them to produce a winter crop as well. This has enabled many farmers to escape food insecurity, build their own homes, buy bicycles and send their children to school with schoolfees. (photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

ZOMBA, MALAWI-JULY 2007: Grain Bank storage with new elevated storage techniques at the Millenium Village facility in Zomba, Malawi, 17 July 2007. This grain bank stores at least 3 bags for each family in the scheme, in many cases far more. This provides financial security for families and also allows a financial system to develop which will make the farmers independant of aid. Many farmers in Malawi credit their recent success to hybrid seeds and fertilizers which have in many cases more than doubled their crops and enabled them to produce a winter crop as well. (photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

MZIMBA, MALAWI-JULY 2008: A Malawian farmer stands in a rural field of sweet potatoes in Mzimba, Malawi, 17 July 2008. This is a bumper year for Malawian farmers and the sweet potatoes are a cash crop, maize is plentiful and this food security allows farmers to grow cash crops such as sweet potato. Many farmers in Malawi credit their recent success to progessive agriculture which includes hybrid seeds and fertilizers which have in many cases more than doubled their crops and enabled them to produce a winter crop as well. This has enabled many farmers to escape food insecurity, build their own homes, buy bicycles and send their children to school with school fees. (photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

ZOMBA, MALAWI-JULY 2008: Alex Kampuku with his goats and his daughter Jdesi, Zomba, Malawi, 17 July 2008. To assist impoverished farmers the Millenium Project gives two goats to people who could never afford to buy them, after the goats have mated a few times, the farmers then pass on a breeding pair to another impoverished farmer. This provides an income and also a source of animal protein for farmer's diets. (photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

BUNGOMA, KENYA - 13 SEPTEMBER: Images of a poor, rural, outdoor school for young children, September 11, 2007 in Bungoma, Kenya. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

RURAL KAMPALA, UGANDA - 13 SEPTEMBER: Images of a rural school for young children outside Kampala, Uganda, 1 October 2008. Rural people polled in this area and in most of rural Africa have consistently said that their number one priority once food security is acheived is to be able to educate and uplift their children. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

LILONGWE, MALAWI-JULY 2008: Scenes from the Kanengo Silo storage and packaging facility in the capital Lilongwe, Malawi, 14 July 2008. Malawi has made a remarkable turnaround in its agricultural production in the last two years, going from a nation facing starvation to using new methods of cultivation to become the biggest producer in the region. (photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

LILONGWE, MALAWI-JULY 2008: Scenes from the Kanengo Silo storage and packaging facility in the capital Lilongwe, Malawi, 14 July 2008. Malawi has made a remarkable turnaround in its agricultural production in the last two years, going from a nation facing starvation to using new methods of cultivation to become the biggest producer in the region. (photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

LILONGWE, MALAWI-JULY 2008: Scenes from the Kanengo Silo storage and packaging facility in the capital Lilongwe, Malawi, 14 July 2008. Malawi has made a remarkable turnaround in its agricultural production in the last two years, going from a nation facing starvation to using new methods of cultivation to become the biggest producer in the region. (photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

LILONGWE, MALAWI-JULY 2008: Scenes from the Kanengo Silo storage and packaging facility in the capital Lilongwe, Malawi, 14 July 2008. Malawi has made a remarkable turnaround in its agricultural production in the last two years, going from a nation facing starvation to using new methods of cultivation to become the biggest producer in the region. (photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

KASUNGO, MALAWI-JULY 2008: A therapeutic feeding centre for malnourished children run by World Food Program in Kasungo, Malawi, 14 July 2008. (photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

ST LOUIS, MISSOURI, MAY 2009: Images of Monsanto agribusiness greenhouses on top of a research building in St Louis, Missouri, 21 May 2009. Monsanto is at the forefront of biotechnology in the agribusiness sector and these greenhouses are housing the corn, soy bean and cotton of the future. All the plants in the Greenhouses have been carefully selected and cross-bred for their elite DNA qualities and are being grown as the crop of the future. It is estimated that these plants will produce seeds which are likely to see actual agricultural production in five to eight years time. (Photograph by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

ST LOUIS, MISSOURI, MAY 2009: Images of advanced seed chipping machines and their technicans inside Monsanto agribusiness headquarters in St Louis, Missouri, 21 May 2009. Monsanto is at the forefront of biotechnology in the agribusiness sector. These machines are designed and built inhouse and they allow the technicans to chip off a tiny portion of thousands of seeds daily. These chips are scanned instantly for the perfect DNA of an elite corn seed and then those seeds that make the grade are forwarded to the next stage of the selection process. Monsanto is a controversial global corporate with a history of strong litigation against those it assumes are interfering with its stringent patent laws. This practise as well as its advanced genetically modified technology approach in the agricultural sector have led many to be suspicious of Monsanto and the ultimate good of GM foods. Monsanto argues back that sufficent food production for the future is simply not possible without adequate GM technology in agriculture. (Photograph by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

ST LOUIS, MISSOURI, MAY 2009: Research Biologist Heidi Windler takes tissue samples from genetically modified corn plants inside a climate chamber housed in Monsanto agribusiness headquarters in St Louis, Missouri, 21 May 2009. Windler is attempting to breed a Corn Root Worm resistant strain of corn which will one day form the basis of a root worm resistant corn crop of the future. Monsanto is at the forefront of biotechnology in the agribusiness sector. These climate chambers are designed and built inhouse and they allow the technicans to monitor plant growth daily. These plants are monitored for the perfect DNA of an elite corn seed and then those plants that make the grade are forwarded to the next stage of the selection process. Monsanto is a controversial global corporate with a history of strong litigation against those it assumes are interfering with its stringent patent laws. This practise as well as its advanced genetically modified technology approach in the agricultural sector have led many to be suspicious of Monsanto and the ultimate good of GM foods. Monsanto argues back that sufficent food production for the future is simply not possible without adequate GM technology in agriculture. (Photograph by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

ST LOUIS, MISSOURI, MAY 2009: Plant Specialist Dustin McMahon hand pollinates genetically modified corn plants inside greenhouses housed on the roof of Monsanto agribusiness headquarters in St Louis, Missouri, 21 May 2009. McMahon is attempting to breed a resistant strain of corn which will one day form the basis of an elite corn crop of the future. Monsanto is at the forefront of biotechnology in the agribusiness sector. These greenhouses are designed and built inhouse and they allow the technicans to monitor plant growth daily. These plants are monitored for the perfect DNA of an elite corn seed and then those plants that make the grade are forwarded to the next stage of the selection process. Monsanto is a controversial global corporate with a history of strong litigation against those it assumes are interfering with its stringent patent laws. This practise as well as its advanced genetically modified technology approach in the agricultural sector have led many to be suspicious of Monsanto and the ultimate good of GM foods. Monsanto argues back that sufficent food production for the future is simply not possible without adequate GM technology in agriculture. (Photograph by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

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