FORT WORTH, TEXAS - 22 SEPTEMBER: Voluei Jose Rodrigues,49, with his horse Gaucho. The "Extreme Mustang Makeover" is a cross between reality television and a dog-show.It pits 100 professional horse trainers against 100 horses-wild mustangs, descendents of the horses brought by Spanish Conquistadores plucked from the romantic range land of the American West and handed over to a hand-selected batch of men and women who still wear chaps to work. The horse whisperers, who have had 100 days to domesticate the mustangs, compete for $25,000 and a version of the title "best-in-show." But more than just a slice of Americana, the competition is part of a more serious problem: keeping the American prairie lands from being overgrazed by a horse population that, if left unchecked, doubles every 4 years, encroaching on ranch lands and destroying natural vegetation. By showing these animals off, the government, whose Bureau of Land Management organized the show, is hoping to increase public interest in adopting them. If they fail, they will have to thin the herds in more controversial ways, including selling them to be slaughtered for horse meat, of which the United States quietly exports 10,000 tons of ever year, according to the United Nations Agricultural Department, September 22, 2007 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

FORT WORTH, TEXAS - 22 SEPTEMBER: David Lee Archer, 53, and his horse Sonkawa Kan. The "Extreme Mustang Makeover" is a cross between reality television and a dog-show.It pits 100 professional horse trainers against 100 horses-wild mustangs, descendents of the horses brought by Spanish Conquistadores plucked from the romantic range land of the American West and handed over to a hand-selected batch of men and women who still wear chaps to work. The horse whisperers, who have had 100 days to domesticate the mustangs, compete for $25,000 and a version of the title "best-in-show." But more than just a slice of Americana, the competition is part of a more serious problem: keeping the American prairie lands from being overgrazed by a horse population that, if left unchecked, doubles every 4 years, encroaching on ranch lands and destroying natural vegetation. By showing these animals off, the government, whose Bureau of Land Management organized the show, is hoping to increase public interest in adopting them. If they fail, they will have to thin the herds in more controversial ways, including selling them to be slaughtered for horse meat, of which the United States quietly exports 10,000 tons of ever year, according to the United Nations Agricultural Department, September 22, 2007 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

FORT WORTH, TEXAS - 22 SEPTEMBER: Karrilynn Savage and her horse Snorts. The "Extreme Mustang Makeover" is a cross between reality television and a dog-show.It pits 100 professional horse trainers against 100 horses-wild mustangs, descendents of the horses brought by Spanish Conquistadores plucked from the romantic range land of the American West and handed over to a hand-selected batch of men and women who still wear chaps to work. The horse whisperers, who have had 100 days to domesticate the mustangs, compete for $25,000 and a version of the title "best-in-show." But more than just a slice of Americana, the competition is part of a more serious problem: keeping the American prairie lands from being overgrazed by a horse population that, if left unchecked, doubles every 4 years, encroaching on ranch lands and destroying natural vegetation. By showing these animals off, the government, whose Bureau of Land Management organized the show, is hoping to increase public interest in adopting them. If they fail, they will have to thin the herds in more controversial ways, including selling them to be slaughtered for horse meat, of which the United States quietly exports 10,000 tons of ever year, according to the United Nations Agricultural Department, September 22, 2007 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

FORT WORTH, TEXAS - 22 SEPTEMBER: Karrilynn Savage and her horse Snorts. The "Extreme Mustang Makeover" is a cross between reality television and a dog-show.It pits 100 professional horse trainers against 100 horses-wild mustangs, descendents of the horses brought by Spanish Conquistadores plucked from the romantic range land of the American West and handed over to a hand-selected batch of men and women who still wear chaps to work. The horse whisperers, who have had 100 days to domesticate the mustangs, compete for $25,000 and a version of the title "best-in-show." But more than just a slice of Americana, the competition is part of a more serious problem: keeping the American prairie lands from being overgrazed by a horse population that, if left unchecked, doubles every 4 years, encroaching on ranch lands and destroying natural vegetation. By showing these animals off, the government, whose Bureau of Land Management organized the show, is hoping to increase public interest in adopting them. If they fail, they will have to thin the herds in more controversial ways, including selling them to be slaughtered for horse meat, of which the United States quietly exports 10,000 tons of ever year, according to the United Nations Agricultural Department, September 22, 2007 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

FORT WORTH, TEXAS - 22 SEPTEMBER: Dwight Bilyk, 54, and his horse "J4." The "Extreme Mustang Makeover" is a cross between reality television and a dog-show.It pits 100 professional horse trainers against 100 horses-wild mustangs, descendents of the horses brought by Spanish Conquistadores plucked from the romantic range land of the American West and handed over to a hand-selected batch of men and women who still wear chaps to work. The horse whisperers, who have had 100 days to domesticate the mustangs, compete for $25,000 and a version of the title "best-in-show." But more than just a slice of Americana, the competition is part of a more serious problem: keeping the American prairie lands from being overgrazed by a horse population that, if left unchecked, doubles every 4 years, encroaching on ranch lands and destroying natural vegetation. By showing these animals off, the government, whose Bureau of Land Management organized the show, is hoping to increase public interest in adopting them. If they fail, they will have to thin the herds in more controversial ways, including selling them to be slaughtered for horse meat, of which the United States quietly exports 10,000 tons of ever year, according to the United Nations Agricultural Department, September 22, 2007 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

FORT WORTH, TEXAS - 22 SEPTEMBER: Ray Arris, 49, and his horse "Hail Yeah." The "Extreme Mustang Makeover" is a cross between reality television and a dog-show.It pits 100 professional horse trainers against 100 horses-wild mustangs, descendents of the horses brought by Spanish Conquistadores plucked from the romantic range land of the American West and handed over to a hand-selected batch of men and women who still wear chaps to work. The horse whisperers, who have had 100 days to domesticate the mustangs, compete for $25,000 and a version of the title "best-in-show." But more than just a slice of Americana, the competition is part of a more serious problem: keeping the American prairie lands from being overgrazed by a horse population that, if left unchecked, doubles every 4 years, encroaching on ranch lands and destroying natural vegetation. By showing these animals off, the government, whose Bureau of Land Management organized the show, is hoping to increase public interest in adopting them. If they fail, they will have to thin the herds in more controversial ways, including selling them to be slaughtered for horse meat, of which the United States quietly exports 10,000 tons of ever year, according to the United Nations Agricultural Department, September 22, 2007 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

FORT WORTH, TEXAS - 22 SEPTEMBER: Jamie Thomas,40, and her horse Patriot. The "Extreme Mustang Makeover" is a cross between reality television and a dog-show.It pits 100 professional horse trainers against 100 horses-wild mustangs, descendents of the horses brought by Spanish Conquistadores plucked from the romantic range land of the American West and handed over to a hand-selected batch of men and women who still wear chaps to work. The horse whisperers, who have had 100 days to domesticate the mustangs, compete for $25,000 and a version of the title "best-in-show." But more than just a slice of Americana, the competition is part of a more serious problem: keeping the American prairie lands from being overgrazed by a horse population that, if left unchecked, doubles every 4 years, encroaching on ranch lands and destroying natural vegetation. By showing these animals off, the government, whose Bureau of Land Management organized the show, is hoping to increase public interest in adopting them. If they fail, they will have to thin the herds in more controversial ways, including selling them to be slaughtered for horse meat, of which the United States quietly exports 10,000 tons of ever year, according to the United Nations Agricultural Department, September 22, 2007 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

FORT WORTH, TEXAS - 22 SEPTEMBER: Guy Woods, 46, the eventual winner of the Mustang Makeover competition and his horse Max. The "Extreme Mustang Makeover" is a cross between reality television and a dog-show.It pits 100 professional horse trainers against 100 horses-wild mustangs, descendents of the horses brought by Spanish Conquistadores plucked from the romantic range land of the American West and handed over to a hand-selected batch of men and women who still wear chaps to work. The horse whisperers, who have had 100 days to domesticate the mustangs, compete for $25,000 and a version of the title "best-in-show." But more than just a slice of Americana, the competition is part of a more serious problem: keeping the American prairie lands from being overgrazed by a horse population that, if left unchecked, doubles every 4 years, encroaching on ranch lands and destroying natural vegetation. By showing these animals off, the government, whose Bureau of Land Management organized the show, is hoping to increase public interest in adopting them. If they fail, they will have to thin the herds in more controversial ways, including selling them to be slaughtered for horse meat, of which the United States quietly exports 10,000 tons of ever year, according to the United Nations Agricultural Department, September 22, 2007 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

FORT WORTH, TEXAS - 22 SEPTEMBER: Byron Hogan and his horse Steel. The "Extreme Mustang Makeover" is a cross between reality television and a dog-show.It pits 100 professional horse trainers against 100 horses-wild mustangs, descendents of the horses brought by Spanish Conquistadores plucked from the romantic range land of the American West and handed over to a hand-selected batch of men and women who still wear chaps to work. The horse whisperers, who have had 100 days to domesticate the mustangs, compete for $25,000 and a version of the title "best-in-show." But more than just a slice of Americana, the competition is part of a more serious problem: keeping the American prairie lands from being overgrazed by a horse population that, if left unchecked, doubles every 4 years, encroaching on ranch lands and destroying natural vegetation. By showing these animals off, the government, whose Bureau of Land Management organized the show, is hoping to increase public interest in adopting them. If they fail, they will have to thin the herds in more controversial ways, including selling them to be slaughtered for horse meat, of which the United States quietly exports 10,000 tons of ever year, according to the United Nations Agricultural Department, September 22, 2007 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

FORT WORTH, TEXAS - 22 SEPTEMBER: The "Extreme Mustang Makeover" is a cross between reality television and a dog-show.It pits 100 professional horse trainers against 100 horses-wild mustangs, descendents of the horses brought by Spanish Conquistadores plucked from the romantic range land of the American West and handed over to a hand-selected batch of men and women who still wear chaps to work. The horse whisperers, who have had 100 days to domesticate the mustangs, compete for $25,000 and a version of the title "best-in-show." But more than just a slice of Americana, the competition is part of a more serious problem: keeping the American prairie lands from being overgrazed by a horse population that, if left unchecked, doubles every 4 years, encroaching on ranch lands and destroying natural vegetation. By showing these animals off, the government, whose Bureau of Land Management organized the show, is hoping to increase public interest in adopting them. If they fail, they will have to thin the herds in more controversial ways, including selling them to be slaughtered for horse meat, of which the United States quietly exports 10,000 tons of ever year, according to the United Nations Agricultural Department, September 22, 2007 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

FORT WORTH, TEXAS - 22 SEPTEMBER: Voluei Jose Rodrigues,49, with his horse Gaucho. The "Extreme Mustang Makeover" is a cross between reality television and a dog-show.It pits 100 professional horse trainers against 100 horses-wild mustangs, descendents of the horses brought by Spanish Conquistadores plucked from the romantic range land of the American West and handed over to a hand-selected batch of men and women who still wear chaps to work. The horse whisperers, who have had 100 days to domesticate the mustangs, compete for $25,000 and a version of the title "best-in-show." But more than just a slice of Americana, the competition is part of a more serious problem: keeping the American prairie lands from being overgrazed by a horse population that, if left unchecked, doubles every 4 years, encroaching on ranch lands and destroying natural vegetation. By showing these animals off, the government, whose Bureau of Land Management organized the show, is hoping to increase public interest in adopting them. If they fail, they will have to thin the herds in more controversial ways, including selling them to be slaughtered for horse meat, of which the United States quietly exports 10,000 tons of ever year, according to the United Nations Agricultural Department, September 22, 2007 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

FORT WORTH, TEXAS - 22 SEPTEMBER: Joseph Meisner, 41, and his horse Pockets. The "Extreme Mustang Makeover" is a cross between reality television and a dog-show.It pits 100 professional horse trainers against 100 horses-wild mustangs, descendents of the horses brought by Spanish Conquistadores plucked from the romantic range land of the American West and handed over to a hand-selected batch of men and women who still wear chaps to work. The horse whisperers, who have had 100 days to domesticate the mustangs, compete for $25,000 and a version of the title "best-in-show." But more than just a slice of Americana, the competition is part of a more serious problem: keeping the American prairie lands from being overgrazed by a horse population that, if left unchecked, doubles every 4 years, encroaching on ranch lands and destroying natural vegetation. By showing these animals off, the government, whose Bureau of Land Management organized the show, is hoping to increase public interest in adopting them. If they fail, they will have to thin the herds in more controversial ways, including selling them to be slaughtered for horse meat, of which the United States quietly exports 10,000 tons of ever year, according to the United Nations Agricultural Department, September 22, 2007 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

FORT WORTH, TEXAS - 22 SEPTEMBER: Jamie Thomas,40, and her horse Patriot. The "Extreme Mustang Makeover" is a cross between reality television and a dog-show.It pits 100 professional horse trainers against 100 horses-wild mustangs, descendents of the horses brought by Spanish Conquistadores plucked from the romantic range land of the American West and handed over to a hand-selected batch of men and women who still wear chaps to work. The horse whisperers, who have had 100 days to domesticate the mustangs, compete for $25,000 and a version of the title "best-in-show." But more than just a slice of Americana, the competition is part of a more serious problem: keeping the American prairie lands from being overgrazed by a horse population that, if left unchecked, doubles every 4 years, encroaching on ranch lands and destroying natural vegetation. By showing these animals off, the government, whose Bureau of Land Management organized the show, is hoping to increase public interest in adopting them. If they fail, they will have to thin the herds in more controversial ways, including selling them to be slaughtered for horse meat, of which the United States quietly exports 10,000 tons of ever year, according to the United Nations Agricultural Department, September 22, 2007 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

FORT WORTH, TEXAS - 22 SEPTEMBER: Dixie LaFountain,30, and her horse "Otter B Good." The "Extreme Mustang Makeover" is a cross between reality television and a dog-show.It pits 100 professional horse trainers against 100 horses-wild mustangs, descendents of the horses brought by Spanish Conquistadores plucked from the romantic range land of the American West and handed over to a hand-selected batch of men and women who still wear chaps to work. The horse whisperers, who have had 100 days to domesticate the mustangs, compete for $25,000 and a version of the title "best-in-show." But more than just a slice of Americana, the competition is part of a more serious problem: keeping the American prairie lands from being overgrazed by a horse population that, if left unchecked, doubles every 4 years, encroaching on ranch lands and destroying natural vegetation. By showing these animals off, the government, whose Bureau of Land Management organized the show, is hoping to increase public interest in adopting them. If they fail, they will have to thin the herds in more controversial ways, including selling them to be slaughtered for horse meat, of which the United States quietly exports 10,000 tons of ever year, according to the United Nations Agricultural Department, September 22, 2007 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

FORT WORTH, TEXAS - 22 SEPTEMBER: The "Extreme Mustang Makeover" is a cross between reality television and a dog-show.It pits 100 professional horse trainers against 100 horses-wild mustangs, descendents of the horses brought by Spanish Conquistadores plucked from the romantic range land of the American West and handed over to a hand-selected batch of men and women who still wear chaps to work. The horse whisperers, who have had 100 days to domesticate the mustangs, compete for $25,000 and a version of the title "best-in-show." But more than just a slice of Americana, the competition is part of a more serious problem: keeping the American prairie lands from being overgrazed by a horse population that, if left unchecked, doubles every 4 years, encroaching on ranch lands and destroying natural vegetation. By showing these animals off, the government, whose Bureau of Land Management organized the show, is hoping to increase public interest in adopting them. If they fail, they will have to thin the herds in more controversial ways, including selling them to be slaughtered for horse meat, of which the United States quietly exports 10,000 tons of ever year, according to the United Nations Agricultural Department, September 22, 2007 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

FORT WORTH, TEXAS - 22 SEPTEMBER: Cindy Branham,31, and Joanne Charboneau, 27, with Cindy's horse Joshua. The "Extreme Mustang Makeover" is a cross between reality television and a dog-show.It pits 100 professional horse trainers against 100 horses-wild mustangs, descendents of the horses brought by Spanish Conquistadores plucked from the romantic range land of the American West and handed over to a hand-selected batch of men and women who still wear chaps to work. The horse whisperers, who have had 100 days to domesticate the mustangs, compete for $25,000 and a version of the title "best-in-show." But more than just a slice of Americana, the competition is part of a more serious problem: keeping the American prairie lands from being overgrazed by a horse population that, if left unchecked, doubles every 4 years, encroaching on ranch lands and destroying natural vegetation. By showing these animals off, the government, whose Bureau of Land Management organized the show, is hoping to increase public interest in adopting them. If they fail, they will have to thin the herds in more controversial ways, including selling them to be slaughtered for horse meat, of which the United States quietly exports 10,000 tons of ever year, according to the United Nations Agricultural Department, September 22, 2007 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

FORT WORTH, TEXAS - 22 SEPTEMBER: Joseph Meisner, 41, and his horse Pockets. The "Extreme Mustang Makeover" is a cross between reality television and a dog-show.It pits 100 professional horse trainers against 100 horses-wild mustangs, descendents of the horses brought by Spanish Conquistadores plucked from the romantic range land of the American West and handed over to a hand-selected batch of men and women who still wear chaps to work. The horse whisperers, who have had 100 days to domesticate the mustangs, compete for $25,000 and a version of the title "best-in-show." But more than just a slice of Americana, the competition is part of a more serious problem: keeping the American prairie lands from being overgrazed by a horse population that, if left unchecked, doubles every 4 years, encroaching on ranch lands and destroying natural vegetation. By showing these animals off, the government, whose Bureau of Land Management organized the show, is hoping to increase public interest in adopting them. If they fail, they will have to thin the herds in more controversial ways, including selling them to be slaughtered for horse meat, of which the United States quietly exports 10,000 tons of ever year, according to the United Nations Agricultural Department, September 22, 2007 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

FORT WORTH, TEXAS - 22 SEPTEMBER: The "Extreme Mustang Makeover" is a cross between reality television and a dog-show.It pits 100 professional horse trainers against 100 horses-wild mustangs, descendents of the horses brought by Spanish Conquistadores plucked from the romantic range land of the American West and handed over to a hand-selected batch of men and women who still wear chaps to work. The horse whisperers, who have had 100 days to domesticate the mustangs, compete for $25,000 and a version of the title "best-in-show." But more than just a slice of Americana, the competition is part of a more serious problem: keeping the American prairie lands from being overgrazed by a horse population that, if left unchecked, doubles every 4 years, encroaching on ranch lands and destroying natural vegetation. By showing these animals off, the government, whose Bureau of Land Management organized the show, is hoping to increase public interest in adopting them. If they fail, they will have to thin the herds in more controversial ways, including selling them to be slaughtered for horse meat, of which the United States quietly exports 10,000 tons of ever year, according to the United Nations Agricultural Department, September 22, 2007 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

FORT WORTH, TEXAS - 22 SEPTEMBER: The "Extreme Mustang Makeover" is a cross between reality television and a dog-show.It pits 100 professional horse trainers against 100 horses-wild mustangs, descendents of the horses brought by Spanish Conquistadores plucked from the romantic range land of the American West and handed over to a hand-selected batch of men and women who still wear chaps to work. The horse whisperers, who have had 100 days to domesticate the mustangs, compete for $25,000 and a version of the title "best-in-show." But more than just a slice of Americana, the competition is part of a more serious problem: keeping the American prairie lands from being overgrazed by a horse population that, if left unchecked, doubles every 4 years, encroaching on ranch lands and destroying natural vegetation. By showing these animals off, the government, whose Bureau of Land Management organized the show, is hoping to increase public interest in adopting them. If they fail, they will have to thin the herds in more controversial ways, including selling them to be slaughtered for horse meat, of which the United States quietly exports 10,000 tons of ever year, according to the United Nations Agricultural Department, September 22, 2007 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

FORT WORTH, TEXAS - 22 SEPTEMBER: The "Extreme Mustang Makeover" is a cross between reality television and a dog-show.It pits 100 professional horse trainers against 100 horses-wild mustangs, descendents of the horses brought by Spanish Conquistadores plucked from the romantic range land of the American West and handed over to a hand-selected batch of men and women who still wear chaps to work. The horse whisperers, who have had 100 days to domesticate the mustangs, compete for $25,000 and a version of the title "best-in-show." But more than just a slice of Americana, the competition is part of a more serious problem: keeping the American prairie lands from being overgrazed by a horse population that, if left unchecked, doubles every 4 years, encroaching on ranch lands and destroying natural vegetation. By showing these animals off, the government, whose Bureau of Land Management organized the show, is hoping to increase public interest in adopting them. If they fail, they will have to thin the herds in more controversial ways, including selling them to be slaughtered for horse meat, of which the United States quietly exports 10,000 tons of ever year, according to the United Nations Agricultural Department, September 22, 2007 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

FORT WORTH, TEXAS - 22 SEPTEMBER: The "Extreme Mustang Makeover" is a cross between reality television and a dog-show.It pits 100 professional horse trainers against 100 horses-wild mustangs, descendents of the horses brought by Spanish Conquistadores plucked from the romantic range land of the American West and handed over to a hand-selected batch of men and women who still wear chaps to work. The horse whisperers, who have had 100 days to domesticate the mustangs, compete for $25,000 and a version of the title "best-in-show." But more than just a slice of Americana, the competition is part of a more serious problem: keeping the American prairie lands from being overgrazed by a horse population that, if left unchecked, doubles every 4 years, encroaching on ranch lands and destroying natural vegetation. By showing these animals off, the government, whose Bureau of Land Management organized the show, is hoping to increase public interest in adopting them. If they fail, they will have to thin the herds in more controversial ways, including selling them to be slaughtered for horse meat, of which the United States quietly exports 10,000 tons of ever year, according to the United Nations Agricultural Department, September 22, 2007 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

FORT WORTH, TEXAS - 22 SEPTEMBER: Lauren Maples comforts "Winnemucca" in her stall at the Mustang Makeover. The "Extreme Mustang Makeover" is a cross between reality television and a dog-show.It pits 100 professional horse trainers against 100 horses-wild mustangs, descendents of the horses brought by Spanish Conquistadores plucked from the romantic range land of the American West and handed over to a hand-selected batch of men and women who still wear chaps to work. The horse whisperers, who have had 100 days to domesticate the mustangs, compete for $25,000 and a version of the title "best-in-show." But more than just a slice of Americana, the competition is part of a more serious problem: keeping the American prairie lands from being overgrazed by a horse population that, if left unchecked, doubles every 4 years, encroaching on ranch lands and destroying natural vegetation. By showing these animals off, the government, whose Bureau of Land Management organized the show, is hoping to increase public interest in adopting them. If they fail, they will have to thin the herds in more controversial ways, including selling them to be slaughtered for horse meat, of which the United States quietly exports 10,000 tons of ever year, according to the United Nations Agricultural Department, September 22, 2007 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

FORT WORTH, TEXAS - 22 SEPTEMBER: The "Extreme Mustang Makeover" is a cross between reality television and a dog-show.It pits 100 professional horse trainers against 100 horses-wild mustangs, descendents of the horses brought by Spanish Conquistadores plucked from the romantic range land of the American West and handed over to a hand-selected batch of men and women who still wear chaps to work. The horse whisperers, who have had 100 days to domesticate the mustangs, compete for $25,000 and a version of the title "best-in-show." But more than just a slice of Americana, the competition is part of a more serious problem: keeping the American prairie lands from being overgrazed by a horse population that, if left unchecked, doubles every 4 years, encroaching on ranch lands and destroying natural vegetation. By showing these animals off, the government, whose Bureau of Land Management organized the show, is hoping to increase public interest in adopting them. If they fail, they will have to thin the herds in more controversial ways, including selling them to be slaughtered for horse meat, of which the United States quietly exports 10,000 tons of ever year, according to the United Nations Agricultural Department, September 22, 2007 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

FORT WORTH, TEXAS - 22 SEPTEMBER: The "Extreme Mustang Makeover" is a cross between reality television and a dog-show.It pits 100 professional horse trainers against 100 horses-wild mustangs, descendents of the horses brought by Spanish Conquistadores plucked from the romantic range land of the American West and handed over to a hand-selected batch of men and women who still wear chaps to work. The horse whisperers, who have had 100 days to domesticate the mustangs, compete for $25,000 and a version of the title "best-in-show." But more than just a slice of Americana, the competition is part of a more serious problem: keeping the American prairie lands from being overgrazed by a horse population that, if left unchecked, doubles every 4 years, encroaching on ranch lands and destroying natural vegetation. By showing these animals off, the government, whose Bureau of Land Management organized the show, is hoping to increase public interest in adopting them. If they fail, they will have to thin the herds in more controversial ways, including selling them to be slaughtered for horse meat, of which the United States quietly exports 10,000 tons of ever year, according to the United Nations Agricultural Department, September 22, 2007 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

FORT WORTH, TEXAS - 22 SEPTEMBER: The "Extreme Mustang Makeover" is a cross between reality television and a dog-show.It pits 100 professional horse trainers against 100 horses-wild mustangs, descendents of the horses brought by Spanish Conquistadores plucked from the romantic range land of the American West and handed over to a hand-selected batch of men and women who still wear chaps to work. The horse whisperers, who have had 100 days to domesticate the mustangs, compete for $25,000 and a version of the title "best-in-show." But more than just a slice of Americana, the competition is part of a more serious problem: keeping the American prairie lands from being overgrazed by a horse population that, if left unchecked, doubles every 4 years, encroaching on ranch lands and destroying natural vegetation. By showing these animals off, the government, whose Bureau of Land Management organized the show, is hoping to increase public interest in adopting them. If they fail, they will have to thin the herds in more controversial ways, including selling them to be slaughtered for horse meat, of which the United States quietly exports 10,000 tons of ever year, according to the United Nations Agricultural Department, September 22, 2007 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

 FORT WORTH, TEXAS - 22 SEPTEMBER: Voluei Jose Rodrigues,49, with his horse Gaucho. The "Extreme Mustang Makeover" is a cross between reality television and a 
dog-show.It pits 100 professional horse trainers against 100 horses-wild mustangs, descendents of the horses brought by Spanish Conquistadores plucked from the romantic range land of the American West and handed over to a hand-selected batch of men and women who still wear chaps to work. The horse whisperers, who have had 
100 days to domesticate the mustangs, compete for $25,000 and a version of the title "best-in-show." But more than just a slice of Americana, the competition is part of a more serious problem: keeping the 
American prairie lands from being overgrazed by a horse population that, if left unchecked, doubles every 4 years, encroaching on ranch lands and destroying natural vegetation. By showing these animals off, the government, whose Bureau of Land Management organized the show, is hoping to increase public interest in adopting them. If they fail, they will have to thin the herds in more controversial ways, including selling them to be slaughtered for horse meat, of which the United States quietly exports 10,000 tons of ever year, according to the United Nations Agricultural 
Department, September 22, 2007 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 FORT WORTH, TEXAS - 22 SEPTEMBER: David Lee Archer, 53, and his horse Sonkawa Kan. The "Extreme Mustang Makeover" is a cross between reality television and a 
dog-show.It pits 100 professional horse trainers against 100 horses-wild mustangs, descendents of the horses brought by Spanish Conquistadores plucked from the romantic range land of the American West and handed over to a hand-selected batch of men and women who still wear chaps to work. The horse whisperers, who have had 
100 days to domesticate the mustangs, compete for $25,000 and a version of the title "best-in-show." But more than just a slice of Americana, the competition is part of a more serious problem: keeping the 
American prairie lands from being overgrazed by a horse population that, if left unchecked, doubles every 4 years, encroaching on ranch lands and destroying natural vegetation. By showing these animals off, the government, whose Bureau of Land Management organized the show, is hoping to increase public interest in adopting them. If they fail, they will have to thin the herds in more controversial ways, including selling them to be slaughtered for horse meat, of which the United States quietly exports 10,000 tons of ever year, according to the United Nations Agricultural 
Department, September 22, 2007 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 FORT WORTH, TEXAS - 22 SEPTEMBER: Karrilynn Savage and her horse Snorts. The "Extreme Mustang Makeover" is a cross between reality television and a 
dog-show.It pits 100 professional horse trainers against 100 horses-wild mustangs, descendents of the horses brought by Spanish Conquistadores plucked from the romantic range land of the American West and handed over to a hand-selected batch of men and women who still wear chaps to work. The horse whisperers, who have had 
100 days to domesticate the mustangs, compete for $25,000 and a version of the title "best-in-show." But more than just a slice of Americana, the competition is part of a more serious problem: keeping the 
American prairie lands from being overgrazed by a horse population that, if left unchecked, doubles every 4 years, encroaching on ranch lands and destroying natural vegetation. By showing these animals off, the government, whose Bureau of Land Management organized the show, is hoping to increase public interest in adopting them. If they fail, they will have to thin the herds in more controversial ways, including selling them to be slaughtered for horse meat, of which the United States quietly exports 10,000 tons of ever year, according to the United Nations Agricultural 
Department, September 22, 2007 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 FORT WORTH, TEXAS - 22 SEPTEMBER: Karrilynn Savage and her horse Snorts. The "Extreme Mustang Makeover" is a cross between reality television and a 
dog-show.It pits 100 professional horse trainers against 100 horses-wild mustangs, descendents of the horses brought by Spanish Conquistadores plucked from the romantic range land of the American West and handed over to a hand-selected batch of men and women who still wear chaps to work. The horse whisperers, who have had 
100 days to domesticate the mustangs, compete for $25,000 and a version of the title "best-in-show." But more than just a slice of Americana, the competition is part of a more serious problem: keeping the 
American prairie lands from being overgrazed by a horse population that, if left unchecked, doubles every 4 years, encroaching on ranch lands and destroying natural vegetation. By showing these animals off, the government, whose Bureau of Land Management organized the show, is hoping to increase public interest in adopting them. If they fail, they will have to thin the herds in more controversial ways, including selling them to be slaughtered for horse meat, of which the United States quietly exports 10,000 tons of ever year, according to the United Nations Agricultural 
Department, September 22, 2007 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 FORT WORTH, TEXAS - 22 SEPTEMBER: Dwight Bilyk, 54, and his horse "J4." The "Extreme Mustang Makeover" is a cross between reality television and a 
dog-show.It pits 100 professional horse trainers against 100 horses-wild mustangs, descendents of the horses brought by Spanish Conquistadores plucked from the romantic range land of the American West and handed over to a hand-selected batch of men and women who still wear chaps to work. The horse whisperers, who have had 
100 days to domesticate the mustangs, compete for $25,000 and a version of the title "best-in-show." But more than just a slice of Americana, the competition is part of a more serious problem: keeping the 
American prairie lands from being overgrazed by a horse population that, if left unchecked, doubles every 4 years, encroaching on ranch lands and destroying natural vegetation. By showing these animals off, the government, whose Bureau of Land Management organized the show, is hoping to increase public interest in adopting them. If they fail, they will have to thin the herds in more controversial ways, including selling them to be slaughtered for horse meat, of which the United States quietly exports 10,000 tons of ever year, according to the United Nations Agricultural 
Department, September 22, 2007 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 FORT WORTH, TEXAS - 22 SEPTEMBER: Ray Arris, 49, and his horse "Hail Yeah." The "Extreme Mustang Makeover" is a cross between reality television and a 
dog-show.It pits 100 professional horse trainers against 100 horses-wild mustangs, descendents of the horses brought by Spanish Conquistadores plucked from the romantic range land of the American West and handed over to a hand-selected batch of men and women who still wear chaps to work. The horse whisperers, who have had 
100 days to domesticate the mustangs, compete for $25,000 and a version of the title "best-in-show." But more than just a slice of Americana, the competition is part of a more serious problem: keeping the 
American prairie lands from being overgrazed by a horse population that, if left unchecked, doubles every 4 years, encroaching on ranch lands and destroying natural vegetation. By showing these animals off, the government, whose Bureau of Land Management organized the show, is hoping to increase public interest in adopting them. If they fail, they will have to thin the herds in more controversial ways, including selling them to be slaughtered for horse meat, of which the United States quietly exports 10,000 tons of ever year, according to the United Nations Agricultural 
Department, September 22, 2007 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 FORT WORTH, TEXAS - 22 SEPTEMBER: Jamie Thomas,40, and her horse Patriot. The "Extreme Mustang Makeover" is a cross between reality television and a 
dog-show.It pits 100 professional horse trainers against 100 horses-wild mustangs, descendents of the horses brought by Spanish Conquistadores plucked from the romantic range land of the American West and handed over to a hand-selected batch of men and women who still wear chaps to work. The horse whisperers, who have had 
100 days to domesticate the mustangs, compete for $25,000 and a version of the title "best-in-show." But more than just a slice of Americana, the competition is part of a more serious problem: keeping the 
American prairie lands from being overgrazed by a horse population that, if left unchecked, doubles every 4 years, encroaching on ranch lands and destroying natural vegetation. By showing these animals off, the government, whose Bureau of Land Management organized the show, is hoping to increase public interest in adopting them. If they fail, they will have to thin the herds in more controversial ways, including selling them to be slaughtered for horse meat, of which the United States quietly exports 10,000 tons of ever year, according to the United Nations Agricultural 
Department, September 22, 2007 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 FORT WORTH, TEXAS - 22 SEPTEMBER: Guy Woods, 46, the eventual winner of the Mustang Makeover competition and his horse 
Max. The "Extreme Mustang Makeover" is a cross between reality television and a 
dog-show.It pits 100 professional horse trainers against 100 horses-wild mustangs, descendents of the horses brought by Spanish Conquistadores plucked from the romantic range land of the American West and handed over to a hand-selected batch of men and women who still wear chaps to work. The horse whisperers, who have had 
100 days to domesticate the mustangs, compete for $25,000 and a version of the title "best-in-show." But more than just a slice of Americana, the competition is part of a more serious problem: keeping the 
American prairie lands from being overgrazed by a horse population that, if left unchecked, doubles every 4 years, encroaching on ranch lands and destroying natural vegetation. By showing these animals off, the government, whose Bureau of Land Management organized the show, is hoping to increase public interest in adopting them. If they fail, they will have to thin the herds in more controversial ways, including selling them to be slaughtered for horse meat, of which the United States quietly exports 10,000 tons of ever year, according to the United Nations Agricultural 
Department, September 22, 2007 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 FORT WORTH, TEXAS - 22 SEPTEMBER: Byron Hogan and his horse Steel. The "Extreme Mustang Makeover" is a cross between reality television and a 
dog-show.It pits 100 professional horse trainers against 100 horses-wild mustangs, descendents of the horses brought by Spanish Conquistadores plucked from the romantic range land of the American West and handed over to a hand-selected batch of men and women who still wear chaps to work. The horse whisperers, who have had 
100 days to domesticate the mustangs, compete for $25,000 and a version of the title "best-in-show." But more than just a slice of Americana, the competition is part of a more serious problem: keeping the 
American prairie lands from being overgrazed by a horse population that, if left unchecked, doubles every 4 years, encroaching on ranch lands and destroying natural vegetation. By showing these animals off, the government, whose Bureau of Land Management organized the show, is hoping to increase public interest in adopting them. If they fail, they will have to thin the herds in more controversial ways, including selling them to be slaughtered for horse meat, of which the United States quietly exports 10,000 tons of ever year, according to the United Nations Agricultural 
Department, September 22, 2007 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 FORT WORTH, TEXAS - 22 SEPTEMBER: The "Extreme Mustang Makeover" is a cross between reality television and a 
dog-show.It pits 100 professional horse trainers against 100 horses-wild mustangs, descendents of the horses brought by Spanish Conquistadores plucked from the romantic range land of the American West and handed over to a hand-selected batch of men and women who still wear chaps to work. The horse whisperers, who have had 
100 days to domesticate the mustangs, compete for $25,000 and a version of the title "best-in-show." But more than just a slice of Americana, the competition is part of a more serious problem: keeping the 
American prairie lands from being overgrazed by a horse population that, if left unchecked, doubles every 4 years, encroaching on ranch lands and destroying natural vegetation. By showing these animals off, the government, whose Bureau of Land Management organized the show, is hoping to increase public interest in adopting them. If they fail, they will have to thin the herds in more controversial ways, including selling them to be slaughtered for horse meat, of which the United States quietly exports 10,000 tons of ever year, according to the United Nations Agricultural 
Department, September 22, 2007 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 FORT WORTH, TEXAS - 22 SEPTEMBER: Voluei Jose Rodrigues,49, with his horse Gaucho. The "Extreme Mustang Makeover" is a cross between reality television and a 
dog-show.It pits 100 professional horse trainers against 100 horses-wild mustangs, descendents of the horses brought by Spanish Conquistadores plucked from the romantic range land of the American West and handed over to a hand-selected batch of men and women who still wear chaps to work. The horse whisperers, who have had 
100 days to domesticate the mustangs, compete for $25,000 and a version of the title "best-in-show." But more than just a slice of Americana, the competition is part of a more serious problem: keeping the 
American prairie lands from being overgrazed by a horse population that, if left unchecked, doubles every 4 years, encroaching on ranch lands and destroying natural vegetation. By showing these animals off, the government, whose Bureau of Land Management organized the show, is hoping to increase public interest in adopting them. If they fail, they will have to thin the herds in more controversial ways, including selling them to be slaughtered for horse meat, of which the United States quietly exports 10,000 tons of ever year, according to the United Nations Agricultural 
Department, September 22, 2007 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 FORT WORTH, TEXAS - 22 SEPTEMBER: Joseph Meisner, 41, and his horse Pockets. The "Extreme Mustang Makeover" is a cross between reality television and a 
dog-show.It pits 100 professional horse trainers against 100 horses-wild mustangs, descendents of the horses brought by Spanish Conquistadores plucked from the romantic range land of the American West and handed over to a hand-selected batch of men and women who still wear chaps to work. The horse whisperers, who have had 
100 days to domesticate the mustangs, compete for $25,000 and a version of the title "best-in-show." But more than just a slice of Americana, the competition is part of a more serious problem: keeping the 
American prairie lands from being overgrazed by a horse population that, if left unchecked, doubles every 4 years, encroaching on ranch lands and destroying natural vegetation. By showing these animals off, the government, whose Bureau of Land Management organized the show, is hoping to increase public interest in adopting them. If they fail, they will have to thin the herds in more controversial ways, including selling them to be slaughtered for horse meat, of which the United States quietly exports 10,000 tons of ever year, according to the United Nations Agricultural 
Department, September 22, 2007 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 FORT WORTH, TEXAS - 22 SEPTEMBER: Jamie Thomas,40, and her horse Patriot. The "Extreme Mustang Makeover" is a cross between reality television and a 
dog-show.It pits 100 professional horse trainers against 100 horses-wild mustangs, descendents of the horses brought by Spanish Conquistadores plucked from the romantic range land of the American West and handed over to a hand-selected batch of men and women who still wear chaps to work. The horse whisperers, who have had 
100 days to domesticate the mustangs, compete for $25,000 and a version of the title "best-in-show." But more than just a slice of Americana, the competition is part of a more serious problem: keeping the 
American prairie lands from being overgrazed by a horse population that, if left unchecked, doubles every 4 years, encroaching on ranch lands and destroying natural vegetation. By showing these animals off, the government, whose Bureau of Land Management organized the show, is hoping to increase public interest in adopting them. If they fail, they will have to thin the herds in more controversial ways, including selling them to be slaughtered for horse meat, of which the United States quietly exports 10,000 tons of ever year, according to the United Nations Agricultural 
Department, September 22, 2007 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 FORT WORTH, TEXAS - 22 SEPTEMBER: Dixie LaFountain,30, and her horse "Otter B Good." The "Extreme Mustang Makeover" is a cross between reality television and a 
dog-show.It pits 100 professional horse trainers against 100 horses-wild mustangs, descendents of the horses brought by Spanish Conquistadores plucked from the romantic range land of the American West and handed over to a hand-selected batch of men and women who still wear chaps to work. The horse whisperers, who have had 
100 days to domesticate the mustangs, compete for $25,000 and a version of the title "best-in-show." But more than just a slice of Americana, the competition is part of a more serious problem: keeping the 
American prairie lands from being overgrazed by a horse population that, if left unchecked, doubles every 4 years, encroaching on ranch lands and destroying natural vegetation. By showing these animals off, the government, whose Bureau of Land Management organized the show, is hoping to increase public interest in adopting them. If they fail, they will have to thin the herds in more controversial ways, including selling them to be slaughtered for horse meat, of which the United States quietly exports 10,000 tons of ever year, according to the United Nations Agricultural 
Department, September 22, 2007 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 FORT WORTH, TEXAS - 22 SEPTEMBER: The "Extreme Mustang Makeover" is a cross between reality television and a 
dog-show.It pits 100 professional horse trainers against 100 horses-wild mustangs, descendents of the horses brought by Spanish Conquistadores plucked from the romantic range land of the American West and handed over to a hand-selected batch of men and women who still wear chaps to work. The horse whisperers, who have had 
100 days to domesticate the mustangs, compete for $25,000 and a version of the title "best-in-show." But more than just a slice of Americana, the competition is part of a more serious problem: keeping the 
American prairie lands from being overgrazed by a horse population that, if left unchecked, doubles every 4 years, encroaching on ranch lands and destroying natural vegetation. By showing these animals off, the government, whose Bureau of Land Management organized the show, is hoping to increase public interest in adopting them. If they fail, they will have to thin the herds in more controversial ways, including selling them to be slaughtered for horse meat, of which the United States quietly exports 10,000 tons of ever year, according to the United Nations Agricultural 
Department, September 22, 2007 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 FORT WORTH, TEXAS - 22 SEPTEMBER: Cindy Branham,31, and Joanne Charboneau, 27, with Cindy's horse Joshua. The "Extreme Mustang Makeover" is a cross between reality television and a 
dog-show.It pits 100 professional horse trainers against 100 horses-wild mustangs, descendents of the horses brought by Spanish Conquistadores plucked from the romantic range land of the American West and handed over to a hand-selected batch of men and women who still wear chaps to work. The horse whisperers, who have had 
100 days to domesticate the mustangs, compete for $25,000 and a version of the title "best-in-show." But more than just a slice of Americana, the competition is part of a more serious problem: keeping the 
American prairie lands from being overgrazed by a horse population that, if left unchecked, doubles every 4 years, encroaching on ranch lands and destroying natural vegetation. By showing these animals off, the government, whose Bureau of Land Management organized the show, is hoping to increase public interest in adopting them. If they fail, they will have to thin the herds in more controversial ways, including selling them to be slaughtered for horse meat, of which the United States quietly exports 10,000 tons of ever year, according to the United Nations Agricultural 
Department, September 22, 2007 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 FORT WORTH, TEXAS - 22 SEPTEMBER: Joseph Meisner, 41, and his horse Pockets. The "Extreme Mustang Makeover" is a cross between reality television and a 
dog-show.It pits 100 professional horse trainers against 100 horses-wild mustangs, descendents of the horses brought by Spanish Conquistadores plucked from the romantic range land of the American West and handed over to a hand-selected batch of men and women who still wear chaps to work. The horse whisperers, who have had 
100 days to domesticate the mustangs, compete for $25,000 and a version of the title "best-in-show." But more than just a slice of Americana, the competition is part of a more serious problem: keeping the 
American prairie lands from being overgrazed by a horse population that, if left unchecked, doubles every 4 years, encroaching on ranch lands and destroying natural vegetation. By showing these animals off, the government, whose Bureau of Land Management organized the show, is hoping to increase public interest in adopting them. If they fail, they will have to thin the herds in more controversial ways, including selling them to be slaughtered for horse meat, of which the United States quietly exports 10,000 tons of ever year, according to the United Nations Agricultural 
Department, September 22, 2007 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 FORT WORTH, TEXAS - 22 SEPTEMBER: The "Extreme Mustang Makeover" is a cross between reality television and a 
dog-show.It pits 100 professional horse trainers against 100 horses-wild mustangs, descendents of the horses brought by Spanish Conquistadores plucked from the romantic range land of the American West and handed over to a hand-selected batch of men and women who still wear chaps to work. The horse whisperers, who have had 
100 days to domesticate the mustangs, compete for $25,000 and a version of the title "best-in-show." But more than just a slice of Americana, the competition is part of a more serious problem: keeping the 
American prairie lands from being overgrazed by a horse population that, if left unchecked, doubles every 4 years, encroaching on ranch lands and destroying natural vegetation. By showing these animals off, the government, whose Bureau of Land Management organized the show, is hoping to increase public interest in adopting them. If they fail, they will have to thin the herds in more controversial ways, including selling them to be slaughtered for horse meat, of which the United States quietly exports 10,000 tons of ever year, according to the United Nations Agricultural 
Department, September 22, 2007 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 FORT WORTH, TEXAS - 22 SEPTEMBER: The "Extreme Mustang Makeover" is a cross between reality television and a 
dog-show.It pits 100 professional horse trainers against 100 horses-wild mustangs, descendents of the horses brought by Spanish Conquistadores plucked from the romantic range land of the American West and handed over to a hand-selected batch of men and women who still wear chaps to work. The horse whisperers, who have had 
100 days to domesticate the mustangs, compete for $25,000 and a version of the title "best-in-show." But more than just a slice of Americana, the competition is part of a more serious problem: keeping the 
American prairie lands from being overgrazed by a horse population that, if left unchecked, doubles every 4 years, encroaching on ranch lands and destroying natural vegetation. By showing these animals off, the government, whose Bureau of Land Management organized the show, is hoping to increase public interest in adopting them. If they fail, they will have to thin the herds in more controversial ways, including selling them to be slaughtered for horse meat, of which the United States quietly exports 10,000 tons of ever year, according to the United Nations Agricultural 
Department, September 22, 2007 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 FORT WORTH, TEXAS - 22 SEPTEMBER: The "Extreme Mustang Makeover" is a cross between reality television and a 
dog-show.It pits 100 professional horse trainers against 100 horses-wild mustangs, descendents of the horses brought by Spanish Conquistadores plucked from the romantic range land of the American West and handed over to a hand-selected batch of men and women who still wear chaps to work. The horse whisperers, who have had 
100 days to domesticate the mustangs, compete for $25,000 and a version of the title "best-in-show." But more than just a slice of Americana, the competition is part of a more serious problem: keeping the 
American prairie lands from being overgrazed by a horse population that, if left unchecked, doubles every 4 years, encroaching on ranch lands and destroying natural vegetation. By showing these animals off, the government, whose Bureau of Land Management organized the show, is hoping to increase public interest in adopting them. If they fail, they will have to thin the herds in more controversial ways, including selling them to be slaughtered for horse meat, of which the United States quietly exports 10,000 tons of ever year, according to the United Nations Agricultural 
Department, September 22, 2007 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 FORT WORTH, TEXAS - 22 SEPTEMBER: The "Extreme Mustang Makeover" is a cross between reality television and a 
dog-show.It pits 100 professional horse trainers against 100 horses-wild mustangs, descendents of the horses brought by Spanish Conquistadores plucked from the romantic range land of the American West and handed over to a hand-selected batch of men and women who still wear chaps to work. The horse whisperers, who have had 
100 days to domesticate the mustangs, compete for $25,000 and a version of the title "best-in-show." But more than just a slice of Americana, the competition is part of a more serious problem: keeping the 
American prairie lands from being overgrazed by a horse population that, if left unchecked, doubles every 4 years, encroaching on ranch lands and destroying natural vegetation. By showing these animals off, the government, whose Bureau of Land Management organized the show, is hoping to increase public interest in adopting them. If they fail, they will have to thin the herds in more controversial ways, including selling them to be slaughtered for horse meat, of which the United States quietly exports 10,000 tons of ever year, according to the United Nations Agricultural 
Department, September 22, 2007 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 FORT WORTH, TEXAS - 22 SEPTEMBER: Lauren Maples comforts "Winnemucca" in her stall at the Mustang Makeover. The "Extreme Mustang Makeover" is a cross between reality television and a 
dog-show.It pits 100 professional horse trainers against 100 horses-wild mustangs, descendents of the horses brought by Spanish Conquistadores plucked from the romantic range land of the American West and handed over to a hand-selected batch of men and women who still wear chaps to work. The horse whisperers, who have had 
100 days to domesticate the mustangs, compete for $25,000 and a version of the title "best-in-show." But more than just a slice of Americana, the competition is part of a more serious problem: keeping the 
American prairie lands from being overgrazed by a horse population that, if left unchecked, doubles every 4 years, encroaching on ranch lands and destroying natural vegetation. By showing these animals off, the government, whose Bureau of Land Management organized the show, is hoping to increase public interest in adopting them. If they fail, they will have to thin the herds in more controversial ways, including selling them to be slaughtered for horse meat, of which the United States quietly exports 10,000 tons of ever year, according to the United Nations Agricultural 
Department, September 22, 2007 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 FORT WORTH, TEXAS - 22 SEPTEMBER: The "Extreme Mustang Makeover" is a cross between reality television and a 
dog-show.It pits 100 professional horse trainers against 100 horses-wild mustangs, descendents of the horses brought by Spanish Conquistadores plucked from the romantic range land of the American West and handed over to a hand-selected batch of men and women who still wear chaps to work. The horse whisperers, who have had 
100 days to domesticate the mustangs, compete for $25,000 and a version of the title "best-in-show." But more than just a slice of Americana, the competition is part of a more serious problem: keeping the 
American prairie lands from being overgrazed by a horse population that, if left unchecked, doubles every 4 years, encroaching on ranch lands and destroying natural vegetation. By showing these animals off, the government, whose Bureau of Land Management organized the show, is hoping to increase public interest in adopting them. If they fail, they will have to thin the herds in more controversial ways, including selling them to be slaughtered for horse meat, of which the United States quietly exports 10,000 tons of ever year, according to the United Nations Agricultural 
Department, September 22, 2007 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 FORT WORTH, TEXAS - 22 SEPTEMBER: The "Extreme Mustang Makeover" is a cross between reality television and a 
dog-show.It pits 100 professional horse trainers against 100 horses-wild mustangs, descendents of the horses brought by Spanish Conquistadores plucked from the romantic range land of the American West and handed over to a hand-selected batch of men and women who still wear chaps to work. The horse whisperers, who have had 
100 days to domesticate the mustangs, compete for $25,000 and a version of the title "best-in-show." But more than just a slice of Americana, the competition is part of a more serious problem: keeping the 
American prairie lands from being overgrazed by a horse population that, if left unchecked, doubles every 4 years, encroaching on ranch lands and destroying natural vegetation. By showing these animals off, the government, whose Bureau of Land Management organized the show, is hoping to increase public interest in adopting them. If they fail, they will have to thin the herds in more controversial ways, including selling them to be slaughtered for horse meat, of which the United States quietly exports 10,000 tons of ever year, according to the United Nations Agricultural 
Department, September 22, 2007 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 FORT WORTH, TEXAS - 22 SEPTEMBER: The "Extreme Mustang Makeover" is a cross between reality television and a 
dog-show.It pits 100 professional horse trainers against 100 horses-wild mustangs, descendents of the horses brought by Spanish Conquistadores plucked from the romantic range land of the American West and handed over to a hand-selected batch of men and women who still wear chaps to work. The horse whisperers, who have had 
100 days to domesticate the mustangs, compete for $25,000 and a version of the title "best-in-show." But more than just a slice of Americana, the competition is part of a more serious problem: keeping the 
American prairie lands from being overgrazed by a horse population that, if left unchecked, doubles every 4 years, encroaching on ranch lands and destroying natural vegetation. By showing these animals off, the government, whose Bureau of Land Management organized the show, is hoping to increase public interest in adopting them. If they fail, they will have to thin the herds in more controversial ways, including selling them to be slaughtered for horse meat, of which the United States quietly exports 10,000 tons of ever year, according to the United Nations Agricultural 
Department, September 22, 2007 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

FORT WORTH, TEXAS - 22 SEPTEMBER: Voluei Jose Rodrigues,49, with his horse Gaucho. The "Extreme Mustang Makeover" is a cross between reality television and a dog-show.It pits 100 professional horse trainers against 100 horses-wild mustangs, descendents of the horses brought by Spanish Conquistadores plucked from the romantic range land of the American West and handed over to a hand-selected batch of men and women who still wear chaps to work. The horse whisperers, who have had 100 days to domesticate the mustangs, compete for $25,000 and a version of the title "best-in-show." But more than just a slice of Americana, the competition is part of a more serious problem: keeping the American prairie lands from being overgrazed by a horse population that, if left unchecked, doubles every 4 years, encroaching on ranch lands and destroying natural vegetation. By showing these animals off, the government, whose Bureau of Land Management organized the show, is hoping to increase public interest in adopting them. If they fail, they will have to thin the herds in more controversial ways, including selling them to be slaughtered for horse meat, of which the United States quietly exports 10,000 tons of ever year, according to the United Nations Agricultural Department, September 22, 2007 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

FORT WORTH, TEXAS - 22 SEPTEMBER: David Lee Archer, 53, and his horse Sonkawa Kan. The "Extreme Mustang Makeover" is a cross between reality television and a dog-show.It pits 100 professional horse trainers against 100 horses-wild mustangs, descendents of the horses brought by Spanish Conquistadores plucked from the romantic range land of the American West and handed over to a hand-selected batch of men and women who still wear chaps to work. The horse whisperers, who have had 100 days to domesticate the mustangs, compete for $25,000 and a version of the title "best-in-show." But more than just a slice of Americana, the competition is part of a more serious problem: keeping the American prairie lands from being overgrazed by a horse population that, if left unchecked, doubles every 4 years, encroaching on ranch lands and destroying natural vegetation. By showing these animals off, the government, whose Bureau of Land Management organized the show, is hoping to increase public interest in adopting them. If they fail, they will have to thin the herds in more controversial ways, including selling them to be slaughtered for horse meat, of which the United States quietly exports 10,000 tons of ever year, according to the United Nations Agricultural Department, September 22, 2007 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

FORT WORTH, TEXAS - 22 SEPTEMBER: Karrilynn Savage and her horse Snorts. The "Extreme Mustang Makeover" is a cross between reality television and a dog-show.It pits 100 professional horse trainers against 100 horses-wild mustangs, descendents of the horses brought by Spanish Conquistadores plucked from the romantic range land of the American West and handed over to a hand-selected batch of men and women who still wear chaps to work. The horse whisperers, who have had 100 days to domesticate the mustangs, compete for $25,000 and a version of the title "best-in-show." But more than just a slice of Americana, the competition is part of a more serious problem: keeping the American prairie lands from being overgrazed by a horse population that, if left unchecked, doubles every 4 years, encroaching on ranch lands and destroying natural vegetation. By showing these animals off, the government, whose Bureau of Land Management organized the show, is hoping to increase public interest in adopting them. If they fail, they will have to thin the herds in more controversial ways, including selling them to be slaughtered for horse meat, of which the United States quietly exports 10,000 tons of ever year, according to the United Nations Agricultural Department, September 22, 2007 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

FORT WORTH, TEXAS - 22 SEPTEMBER: Karrilynn Savage and her horse Snorts. The "Extreme Mustang Makeover" is a cross between reality television and a dog-show.It pits 100 professional horse trainers against 100 horses-wild mustangs, descendents of the horses brought by Spanish Conquistadores plucked from the romantic range land of the American West and handed over to a hand-selected batch of men and women who still wear chaps to work. The horse whisperers, who have had 100 days to domesticate the mustangs, compete for $25,000 and a version of the title "best-in-show." But more than just a slice of Americana, the competition is part of a more serious problem: keeping the American prairie lands from being overgrazed by a horse population that, if left unchecked, doubles every 4 years, encroaching on ranch lands and destroying natural vegetation. By showing these animals off, the government, whose Bureau of Land Management organized the show, is hoping to increase public interest in adopting them. If they fail, they will have to thin the herds in more controversial ways, including selling them to be slaughtered for horse meat, of which the United States quietly exports 10,000 tons of ever year, according to the United Nations Agricultural Department, September 22, 2007 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

FORT WORTH, TEXAS - 22 SEPTEMBER: Dwight Bilyk, 54, and his horse "J4." The "Extreme Mustang Makeover" is a cross between reality television and a dog-show.It pits 100 professional horse trainers against 100 horses-wild mustangs, descendents of the horses brought by Spanish Conquistadores plucked from the romantic range land of the American West and handed over to a hand-selected batch of men and women who still wear chaps to work. The horse whisperers, who have had 100 days to domesticate the mustangs, compete for $25,000 and a version of the title "best-in-show." But more than just a slice of Americana, the competition is part of a more serious problem: keeping the American prairie lands from being overgrazed by a horse population that, if left unchecked, doubles every 4 years, encroaching on ranch lands and destroying natural vegetation. By showing these animals off, the government, whose Bureau of Land Management organized the show, is hoping to increase public interest in adopting them. If they fail, they will have to thin the herds in more controversial ways, including selling them to be slaughtered for horse meat, of which the United States quietly exports 10,000 tons of ever year, according to the United Nations Agricultural Department, September 22, 2007 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

FORT WORTH, TEXAS - 22 SEPTEMBER: Ray Arris, 49, and his horse "Hail Yeah." The "Extreme Mustang Makeover" is a cross between reality television and a dog-show.It pits 100 professional horse trainers against 100 horses-wild mustangs, descendents of the horses brought by Spanish Conquistadores plucked from the romantic range land of the American West and handed over to a hand-selected batch of men and women who still wear chaps to work. The horse whisperers, who have had 100 days to domesticate the mustangs, compete for $25,000 and a version of the title "best-in-show." But more than just a slice of Americana, the competition is part of a more serious problem: keeping the American prairie lands from being overgrazed by a horse population that, if left unchecked, doubles every 4 years, encroaching on ranch lands and destroying natural vegetation. By showing these animals off, the government, whose Bureau of Land Management organized the show, is hoping to increase public interest in adopting them. If they fail, they will have to thin the herds in more controversial ways, including selling them to be slaughtered for horse meat, of which the United States quietly exports 10,000 tons of ever year, according to the United Nations Agricultural Department, September 22, 2007 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

FORT WORTH, TEXAS - 22 SEPTEMBER: Jamie Thomas,40, and her horse Patriot. The "Extreme Mustang Makeover" is a cross between reality television and a dog-show.It pits 100 professional horse trainers against 100 horses-wild mustangs, descendents of the horses brought by Spanish Conquistadores plucked from the romantic range land of the American West and handed over to a hand-selected batch of men and women who still wear chaps to work. The horse whisperers, who have had 100 days to domesticate the mustangs, compete for $25,000 and a version of the title "best-in-show." But more than just a slice of Americana, the competition is part of a more serious problem: keeping the American prairie lands from being overgrazed by a horse population that, if left unchecked, doubles every 4 years, encroaching on ranch lands and destroying natural vegetation. By showing these animals off, the government, whose Bureau of Land Management organized the show, is hoping to increase public interest in adopting them. If they fail, they will have to thin the herds in more controversial ways, including selling them to be slaughtered for horse meat, of which the United States quietly exports 10,000 tons of ever year, according to the United Nations Agricultural Department, September 22, 2007 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

FORT WORTH, TEXAS - 22 SEPTEMBER: Guy Woods, 46, the eventual winner of the Mustang Makeover competition and his horse Max. The "Extreme Mustang Makeover" is a cross between reality television and a dog-show.It pits 100 professional horse trainers against 100 horses-wild mustangs, descendents of the horses brought by Spanish Conquistadores plucked from the romantic range land of the American West and handed over to a hand-selected batch of men and women who still wear chaps to work. The horse whisperers, who have had 100 days to domesticate the mustangs, compete for $25,000 and a version of the title "best-in-show." But more than just a slice of Americana, the competition is part of a more serious problem: keeping the American prairie lands from being overgrazed by a horse population that, if left unchecked, doubles every 4 years, encroaching on ranch lands and destroying natural vegetation. By showing these animals off, the government, whose Bureau of Land Management organized the show, is hoping to increase public interest in adopting them. If they fail, they will have to thin the herds in more controversial ways, including selling them to be slaughtered for horse meat, of which the United States quietly exports 10,000 tons of ever year, according to the United Nations Agricultural Department, September 22, 2007 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

FORT WORTH, TEXAS - 22 SEPTEMBER: Byron Hogan and his horse Steel. The "Extreme Mustang Makeover" is a cross between reality television and a dog-show.It pits 100 professional horse trainers against 100 horses-wild mustangs, descendents of the horses brought by Spanish Conquistadores plucked from the romantic range land of the American West and handed over to a hand-selected batch of men and women who still wear chaps to work. The horse whisperers, who have had 100 days to domesticate the mustangs, compete for $25,000 and a version of the title "best-in-show." But more than just a slice of Americana, the competition is part of a more serious problem: keeping the American prairie lands from being overgrazed by a horse population that, if left unchecked, doubles every 4 years, encroaching on ranch lands and destroying natural vegetation. By showing these animals off, the government, whose Bureau of Land Management organized the show, is hoping to increase public interest in adopting them. If they fail, they will have to thin the herds in more controversial ways, including selling them to be slaughtered for horse meat, of which the United States quietly exports 10,000 tons of ever year, according to the United Nations Agricultural Department, September 22, 2007 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

FORT WORTH, TEXAS - 22 SEPTEMBER: The "Extreme Mustang Makeover" is a cross between reality television and a dog-show.It pits 100 professional horse trainers against 100 horses-wild mustangs, descendents of the horses brought by Spanish Conquistadores plucked from the romantic range land of the American West and handed over to a hand-selected batch of men and women who still wear chaps to work. The horse whisperers, who have had 100 days to domesticate the mustangs, compete for $25,000 and a version of the title "best-in-show." But more than just a slice of Americana, the competition is part of a more serious problem: keeping the American prairie lands from being overgrazed by a horse population that, if left unchecked, doubles every 4 years, encroaching on ranch lands and destroying natural vegetation. By showing these animals off, the government, whose Bureau of Land Management organized the show, is hoping to increase public interest in adopting them. If they fail, they will have to thin the herds in more controversial ways, including selling them to be slaughtered for horse meat, of which the United States quietly exports 10,000 tons of ever year, according to the United Nations Agricultural Department, September 22, 2007 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

FORT WORTH, TEXAS - 22 SEPTEMBER: Voluei Jose Rodrigues,49, with his horse Gaucho. The "Extreme Mustang Makeover" is a cross between reality television and a dog-show.It pits 100 professional horse trainers against 100 horses-wild mustangs, descendents of the horses brought by Spanish Conquistadores plucked from the romantic range land of the American West and handed over to a hand-selected batch of men and women who still wear chaps to work. The horse whisperers, who have had 100 days to domesticate the mustangs, compete for $25,000 and a version of the title "best-in-show." But more than just a slice of Americana, the competition is part of a more serious problem: keeping the American prairie lands from being overgrazed by a horse population that, if left unchecked, doubles every 4 years, encroaching on ranch lands and destroying natural vegetation. By showing these animals off, the government, whose Bureau of Land Management organized the show, is hoping to increase public interest in adopting them. If they fail, they will have to thin the herds in more controversial ways, including selling them to be slaughtered for horse meat, of which the United States quietly exports 10,000 tons of ever year, according to the United Nations Agricultural Department, September 22, 2007 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

FORT WORTH, TEXAS - 22 SEPTEMBER: Joseph Meisner, 41, and his horse Pockets. The "Extreme Mustang Makeover" is a cross between reality television and a dog-show.It pits 100 professional horse trainers against 100 horses-wild mustangs, descendents of the horses brought by Spanish Conquistadores plucked from the romantic range land of the American West and handed over to a hand-selected batch of men and women who still wear chaps to work. The horse whisperers, who have had 100 days to domesticate the mustangs, compete for $25,000 and a version of the title "best-in-show." But more than just a slice of Americana, the competition is part of a more serious problem: keeping the American prairie lands from being overgrazed by a horse population that, if left unchecked, doubles every 4 years, encroaching on ranch lands and destroying natural vegetation. By showing these animals off, the government, whose Bureau of Land Management organized the show, is hoping to increase public interest in adopting them. If they fail, they will have to thin the herds in more controversial ways, including selling them to be slaughtered for horse meat, of which the United States quietly exports 10,000 tons of ever year, according to the United Nations Agricultural Department, September 22, 2007 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

FORT WORTH, TEXAS - 22 SEPTEMBER: Jamie Thomas,40, and her horse Patriot. The "Extreme Mustang Makeover" is a cross between reality television and a dog-show.It pits 100 professional horse trainers against 100 horses-wild mustangs, descendents of the horses brought by Spanish Conquistadores plucked from the romantic range land of the American West and handed over to a hand-selected batch of men and women who still wear chaps to work. The horse whisperers, who have had 100 days to domesticate the mustangs, compete for $25,000 and a version of the title "best-in-show." But more than just a slice of Americana, the competition is part of a more serious problem: keeping the American prairie lands from being overgrazed by a horse population that, if left unchecked, doubles every 4 years, encroaching on ranch lands and destroying natural vegetation. By showing these animals off, the government, whose Bureau of Land Management organized the show, is hoping to increase public interest in adopting them. If they fail, they will have to thin the herds in more controversial ways, including selling them to be slaughtered for horse meat, of which the United States quietly exports 10,000 tons of ever year, according to the United Nations Agricultural Department, September 22, 2007 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

FORT WORTH, TEXAS - 22 SEPTEMBER: Dixie LaFountain,30, and her horse "Otter B Good." The "Extreme Mustang Makeover" is a cross between reality television and a dog-show.It pits 100 professional horse trainers against 100 horses-wild mustangs, descendents of the horses brought by Spanish Conquistadores plucked from the romantic range land of the American West and handed over to a hand-selected batch of men and women who still wear chaps to work. The horse whisperers, who have had 100 days to domesticate the mustangs, compete for $25,000 and a version of the title "best-in-show." But more than just a slice of Americana, the competition is part of a more serious problem: keeping the American prairie lands from being overgrazed by a horse population that, if left unchecked, doubles every 4 years, encroaching on ranch lands and destroying natural vegetation. By showing these animals off, the government, whose Bureau of Land Management organized the show, is hoping to increase public interest in adopting them. If they fail, they will have to thin the herds in more controversial ways, including selling them to be slaughtered for horse meat, of which the United States quietly exports 10,000 tons of ever year, according to the United Nations Agricultural Department, September 22, 2007 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

FORT WORTH, TEXAS - 22 SEPTEMBER: The "Extreme Mustang Makeover" is a cross between reality television and a dog-show.It pits 100 professional horse trainers against 100 horses-wild mustangs, descendents of the horses brought by Spanish Conquistadores plucked from the romantic range land of the American West and handed over to a hand-selected batch of men and women who still wear chaps to work. The horse whisperers, who have had 100 days to domesticate the mustangs, compete for $25,000 and a version of the title "best-in-show." But more than just a slice of Americana, the competition is part of a more serious problem: keeping the American prairie lands from being overgrazed by a horse population that, if left unchecked, doubles every 4 years, encroaching on ranch lands and destroying natural vegetation. By showing these animals off, the government, whose Bureau of Land Management organized the show, is hoping to increase public interest in adopting them. If they fail, they will have to thin the herds in more controversial ways, including selling them to be slaughtered for horse meat, of which the United States quietly exports 10,000 tons of ever year, according to the United Nations Agricultural Department, September 22, 2007 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

FORT WORTH, TEXAS - 22 SEPTEMBER: Cindy Branham,31, and Joanne Charboneau, 27, with Cindy's horse Joshua. The "Extreme Mustang Makeover" is a cross between reality television and a dog-show.It pits 100 professional horse trainers against 100 horses-wild mustangs, descendents of the horses brought by Spanish Conquistadores plucked from the romantic range land of the American West and handed over to a hand-selected batch of men and women who still wear chaps to work. The horse whisperers, who have had 100 days to domesticate the mustangs, compete for $25,000 and a version of the title "best-in-show." But more than just a slice of Americana, the competition is part of a more serious problem: keeping the American prairie lands from being overgrazed by a horse population that, if left unchecked, doubles every 4 years, encroaching on ranch lands and destroying natural vegetation. By showing these animals off, the government, whose Bureau of Land Management organized the show, is hoping to increase public interest in adopting them. If they fail, they will have to thin the herds in more controversial ways, including selling them to be slaughtered for horse meat, of which the United States quietly exports 10,000 tons of ever year, according to the United Nations Agricultural Department, September 22, 2007 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

FORT WORTH, TEXAS - 22 SEPTEMBER: Joseph Meisner, 41, and his horse Pockets. The "Extreme Mustang Makeover" is a cross between reality television and a dog-show.It pits 100 professional horse trainers against 100 horses-wild mustangs, descendents of the horses brought by Spanish Conquistadores plucked from the romantic range land of the American West and handed over to a hand-selected batch of men and women who still wear chaps to work. The horse whisperers, who have had 100 days to domesticate the mustangs, compete for $25,000 and a version of the title "best-in-show." But more than just a slice of Americana, the competition is part of a more serious problem: keeping the American prairie lands from being overgrazed by a horse population that, if left unchecked, doubles every 4 years, encroaching on ranch lands and destroying natural vegetation. By showing these animals off, the government, whose Bureau of Land Management organized the show, is hoping to increase public interest in adopting them. If they fail, they will have to thin the herds in more controversial ways, including selling them to be slaughtered for horse meat, of which the United States quietly exports 10,000 tons of ever year, according to the United Nations Agricultural Department, September 22, 2007 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

FORT WORTH, TEXAS - 22 SEPTEMBER: The "Extreme Mustang Makeover" is a cross between reality television and a dog-show.It pits 100 professional horse trainers against 100 horses-wild mustangs, descendents of the horses brought by Spanish Conquistadores plucked from the romantic range land of the American West and handed over to a hand-selected batch of men and women who still wear chaps to work. The horse whisperers, who have had 100 days to domesticate the mustangs, compete for $25,000 and a version of the title "best-in-show." But more than just a slice of Americana, the competition is part of a more serious problem: keeping the American prairie lands from being overgrazed by a horse population that, if left unchecked, doubles every 4 years, encroaching on ranch lands and destroying natural vegetation. By showing these animals off, the government, whose Bureau of Land Management organized the show, is hoping to increase public interest in adopting them. If they fail, they will have to thin the herds in more controversial ways, including selling them to be slaughtered for horse meat, of which the United States quietly exports 10,000 tons of ever year, according to the United Nations Agricultural Department, September 22, 2007 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

FORT WORTH, TEXAS - 22 SEPTEMBER: The "Extreme Mustang Makeover" is a cross between reality television and a dog-show.It pits 100 professional horse trainers against 100 horses-wild mustangs, descendents of the horses brought by Spanish Conquistadores plucked from the romantic range land of the American West and handed over to a hand-selected batch of men and women who still wear chaps to work. The horse whisperers, who have had 100 days to domesticate the mustangs, compete for $25,000 and a version of the title "best-in-show." But more than just a slice of Americana, the competition is part of a more serious problem: keeping the American prairie lands from being overgrazed by a horse population that, if left unchecked, doubles every 4 years, encroaching on ranch lands and destroying natural vegetation. By showing these animals off, the government, whose Bureau of Land Management organized the show, is hoping to increase public interest in adopting them. If they fail, they will have to thin the herds in more controversial ways, including selling them to be slaughtered for horse meat, of which the United States quietly exports 10,000 tons of ever year, according to the United Nations Agricultural Department, September 22, 2007 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

FORT WORTH, TEXAS - 22 SEPTEMBER: The "Extreme Mustang Makeover" is a cross between reality television and a dog-show.It pits 100 professional horse trainers against 100 horses-wild mustangs, descendents of the horses brought by Spanish Conquistadores plucked from the romantic range land of the American West and handed over to a hand-selected batch of men and women who still wear chaps to work. The horse whisperers, who have had 100 days to domesticate the mustangs, compete for $25,000 and a version of the title "best-in-show." But more than just a slice of Americana, the competition is part of a more serious problem: keeping the American prairie lands from being overgrazed by a horse population that, if left unchecked, doubles every 4 years, encroaching on ranch lands and destroying natural vegetation. By showing these animals off, the government, whose Bureau of Land Management organized the show, is hoping to increase public interest in adopting them. If they fail, they will have to thin the herds in more controversial ways, including selling them to be slaughtered for horse meat, of which the United States quietly exports 10,000 tons of ever year, according to the United Nations Agricultural Department, September 22, 2007 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

FORT WORTH, TEXAS - 22 SEPTEMBER: The "Extreme Mustang Makeover" is a cross between reality television and a dog-show.It pits 100 professional horse trainers against 100 horses-wild mustangs, descendents of the horses brought by Spanish Conquistadores plucked from the romantic range land of the American West and handed over to a hand-selected batch of men and women who still wear chaps to work. The horse whisperers, who have had 100 days to domesticate the mustangs, compete for $25,000 and a version of the title "best-in-show." But more than just a slice of Americana, the competition is part of a more serious problem: keeping the American prairie lands from being overgrazed by a horse population that, if left unchecked, doubles every 4 years, encroaching on ranch lands and destroying natural vegetation. By showing these animals off, the government, whose Bureau of Land Management organized the show, is hoping to increase public interest in adopting them. If they fail, they will have to thin the herds in more controversial ways, including selling them to be slaughtered for horse meat, of which the United States quietly exports 10,000 tons of ever year, according to the United Nations Agricultural Department, September 22, 2007 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

FORT WORTH, TEXAS - 22 SEPTEMBER: Lauren Maples comforts "Winnemucca" in her stall at the Mustang Makeover. The "Extreme Mustang Makeover" is a cross between reality television and a dog-show.It pits 100 professional horse trainers against 100 horses-wild mustangs, descendents of the horses brought by Spanish Conquistadores plucked from the romantic range land of the American West and handed over to a hand-selected batch of men and women who still wear chaps to work. The horse whisperers, who have had 100 days to domesticate the mustangs, compete for $25,000 and a version of the title "best-in-show." But more than just a slice of Americana, the competition is part of a more serious problem: keeping the American prairie lands from being overgrazed by a horse population that, if left unchecked, doubles every 4 years, encroaching on ranch lands and destroying natural vegetation. By showing these animals off, the government, whose Bureau of Land Management organized the show, is hoping to increase public interest in adopting them. If they fail, they will have to thin the herds in more controversial ways, including selling them to be slaughtered for horse meat, of which the United States quietly exports 10,000 tons of ever year, according to the United Nations Agricultural Department, September 22, 2007 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

FORT WORTH, TEXAS - 22 SEPTEMBER: The "Extreme Mustang Makeover" is a cross between reality television and a dog-show.It pits 100 professional horse trainers against 100 horses-wild mustangs, descendents of the horses brought by Spanish Conquistadores plucked from the romantic range land of the American West and handed over to a hand-selected batch of men and women who still wear chaps to work. The horse whisperers, who have had 100 days to domesticate the mustangs, compete for $25,000 and a version of the title "best-in-show." But more than just a slice of Americana, the competition is part of a more serious problem: keeping the American prairie lands from being overgrazed by a horse population that, if left unchecked, doubles every 4 years, encroaching on ranch lands and destroying natural vegetation. By showing these animals off, the government, whose Bureau of Land Management organized the show, is hoping to increase public interest in adopting them. If they fail, they will have to thin the herds in more controversial ways, including selling them to be slaughtered for horse meat, of which the United States quietly exports 10,000 tons of ever year, according to the United Nations Agricultural Department, September 22, 2007 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

FORT WORTH, TEXAS - 22 SEPTEMBER: The "Extreme Mustang Makeover" is a cross between reality television and a dog-show.It pits 100 professional horse trainers against 100 horses-wild mustangs, descendents of the horses brought by Spanish Conquistadores plucked from the romantic range land of the American West and handed over to a hand-selected batch of men and women who still wear chaps to work. The horse whisperers, who have had 100 days to domesticate the mustangs, compete for $25,000 and a version of the title "best-in-show." But more than just a slice of Americana, the competition is part of a more serious problem: keeping the American prairie lands from being overgrazed by a horse population that, if left unchecked, doubles every 4 years, encroaching on ranch lands and destroying natural vegetation. By showing these animals off, the government, whose Bureau of Land Management organized the show, is hoping to increase public interest in adopting them. If they fail, they will have to thin the herds in more controversial ways, including selling them to be slaughtered for horse meat, of which the United States quietly exports 10,000 tons of ever year, according to the United Nations Agricultural Department, September 22, 2007 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

FORT WORTH, TEXAS - 22 SEPTEMBER: The "Extreme Mustang Makeover" is a cross between reality television and a dog-show.It pits 100 professional horse trainers against 100 horses-wild mustangs, descendents of the horses brought by Spanish Conquistadores plucked from the romantic range land of the American West and handed over to a hand-selected batch of men and women who still wear chaps to work. The horse whisperers, who have had 100 days to domesticate the mustangs, compete for $25,000 and a version of the title "best-in-show." But more than just a slice of Americana, the competition is part of a more serious problem: keeping the American prairie lands from being overgrazed by a horse population that, if left unchecked, doubles every 4 years, encroaching on ranch lands and destroying natural vegetation. By showing these animals off, the government, whose Bureau of Land Management organized the show, is hoping to increase public interest in adopting them. If they fail, they will have to thin the herds in more controversial ways, including selling them to be slaughtered for horse meat, of which the United States quietly exports 10,000 tons of ever year, according to the United Nations Agricultural Department, September 22, 2007 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

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