KISUMU, KENYA, 21 JUNE 2015: Shelvine Achreng is sick with Leukemia and Sickle Cell disease. Her parents are impoverished farm labourers who cannot afford transport to the appropriate hospital, let alone the costs of treating Shelvine's condition. Victims of this kind of disease amongst Africa's poor are destined to die without outside intervention. Non-Communicable diseases like Cancer, Hypertension and Diabetes are on the rise in Africa, adding to the strain the more traditional diseases already place on populations. Poverty only serves to increase fatalities amongst the poorest of these. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis)

DHAKA CITY, BANGLADESH, AUGUST 2015: A child suffering from acute Childhood Pneumonia is given respitary tests, temperature readings and wieighed at the local Kamalapur clinic. From there the child has blood taken for a test and then is sent to the main hospital once diagnosed with acute Pneumonia. ICDDR,B is an independent, non-profit health research institute dedicated to improving the lives of people living in poverty in Bangladesh and globally. They specialize in child and adolescent health with a focus on diarrheal diseases, cholera as well as childhood pneumonia. Their urban site at Kamalapur was founded to monitor pneumonia in children through fieldworkers who are in the field every day. There are 60 field staff, 18 medical teams, and 3 researchers. These field teams are made up entirely of women as they are dealing with mothers most of the time. These field teams conduct daily surveys that relate to fever, labored breathing, lethargy, and inability to drink water, convulsions and headaches. Each fieldworker will see at least 23 patients every day, 6 days a week. If necessary, the child is then brought to the Kamalapur clinic where they are given blood tests, nebulized and given Amoxicillin if the need exists. In severe cases they are taken to the main ICDDR hospital in Dhaka. In most cases, local rickshaws will be used for transport; this is the most common means of transport in Dhaka. When a fieldworker visits a home, she will check the temperature of the child as well as the respiratory rate. She will then ask the mother a number of questions on the child’s health. This all goes to form a large database that has come to represent the country as a whole. Pneumonia remains one of the biggest killers of children under 5 around the world today. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis.)

DHAKA CITY, BANGLADESH, AUGUST 2015: An ICDDR,B healthcare workers deals with a mother who's child is suffering from severe childhood Pneumonia. A decision is made to get the child to the Kamalapur clinic for testing asap, then the child is taken to the main ICDDR,B hospital in Dhaka city. THe main mode of transport for this is the rickshaw. ICDDR,B is an independent, non-profit health research institute dedicated to improving the lives of people living in poverty in Bangladesh and globally. They specialize in child and adolescent health with a focus on diarrheal diseases, cholera as well as childhood pneumonia. Their urban site at Kamalapur was founded to monitor pneumonia in children through fieldworkers who are in the field every day. There are 60 field staff, 18 medical teams, and 3 researchers. These field teams are made up entirely of women as they are dealing with mothers most of the time. These field teams conduct daily surveys that relate to fever, labored breathing, lethargy, and inability to drink water, convulsions and headaches. Each fieldworker will see at least 23 patients every day, 6 days a week. If necessary, the child is then brought to the Kamalapur clinic where they are given blood tests, nebulized and given Amoxicillin if the need exists. In severe cases they are taken to the main ICDDR hospital in Dhaka. In most cases, local rickshaws will be used for transport; this is the most common means of transport in Dhaka. When a fieldworker visits a home, she will check the temperature of the child as well as the respiratory rate. She will then ask the mother a number of questions on the child’s health. This all goes to form a large database that has come to represent the country as a whole. Pneumonia remains one of the biggest killers of children under 5 around the world today. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis.)

DHAKA CITY, BANGLADESH, AUGUST 2015: Local men bathe riverside after a long day transporting goods at the local vegetable market. ICDDR,B is an independent, non-profit health research institute dedicated to improving the lives of people living in poverty in Bangladesh and globally. They specialize in child and adolescent health with a focus on diarrheal diseases, cholera as well as childhood pneumonia. Their urban site at Kamalapur was founded to monitor pneumonia in children through fieldworkers who are in the field every day. There are 60 field staff, 18 medical teams, and 3 researchers. These field teams are made up entirely of women as they are dealing with mothers most of the time. These field teams conduct daily surveys that relate to fever, labored breathing, lethargy, and inability to drink water, convulsions and headaches. Each fieldworker will see at least 23 patients every day, 6 days a week. If necessary, the child is then brought to the Kamalapur clinic where they are given blood tests, nebulized and given Amoxicillin if the need exists. In severe cases they are taken to the main ICDDR hospital in Dhaka. In most cases, local rickshaws will be used for transport; this is the most common means of transport in Dhaka. When a fieldworker visits a home, she will check the temperature of the child as well as the respiratory rate. She will then ask the mother a number of questions on the child’s health. This all goes to form a large database that has come to represent the country as a whole. Pneumonia remains one of the biggest killers of children under 5 around the world today. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis.)

DHAKA CITY, BANGLADESH, AUGUST 2015: Healthcare workers survey mothers about their children in the Kamalapur district. ICDDR,B is an independent, non-profit health research institute dedicated to improving the lives of people living in poverty in Bangladesh and globally. They specialize in child and adolescent health with a focus on diarrheal diseases, cholera as well as childhood pneumonia. Their urban site at Kamalapur was founded to monitor pneumonia in children through fieldworkers who are in the field every day. There are 60 field staff, 18 medical teams, and 3 researchers. These field teams are made up entirely of women as they are dealing with mothers most of the time. These field teams conduct daily surveys that relate to fever, labored breathing, lethargy, and inability to drink water, convulsions and headaches. Each fieldworker will see at least 23 patients every day, 6 days a week. If necessary, the child is then brought to the Kamalapur clinic where they are given blood tests, nebulized and given Amoxicillin if the need exists. In severe cases they are taken to the main ICDDR hospital in Dhaka. In most cases, local rickshaws will be used for transport; this is the most common means of transport in Dhaka. When a fieldworker visits a home, she will check the temperature of the child as well as the respiratory rate. She will then ask the mother a number of questions on the child’s health. This all goes to form a large database that has come to represent the country as a whole. Pneumonia remains one of the biggest killers of children under 5 around the world today. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis.)

DHAKA CITY, BANGLADESH, AUGUST 2015:Two mothers who's children are both suffering from Pneumonia wait to receive treatment for their children at the Kamalapur ICDDR,B clinic. ICDDR,B is an independent, non-profit health research institute dedicated to improving the lives of people living in poverty in Bangladesh and globally. They specialize in child and adolescent health with a focus on diarrheal diseases, cholera as well as childhood pneumonia. Their urban site at Kamalapur was founded to monitor pneumonia in children through fieldworkers who are in the field every day. There are 60 field staff, 18 medical teams, and 3 researchers. These field teams are made up entirely of women as they are dealing with mothers most of the time. These field teams conduct daily surveys that relate to fever, labored breathing, lethargy, and inability to drink water, convulsions and headaches. Each fieldworker will see at least 23 patients every day, 6 days a week. If necessary, the child is then brought to the Kamalapur clinic where they are given blood tests, nebulized and given Amoxicillin if the need exists. In severe cases they are taken to the main ICDDR hospital in Dhaka. In most cases, local rickshaws will be used for transport; this is the most common means of transport in Dhaka. When a fieldworker visits a home, she will check the temperature of the child as well as the respiratory rate. She will then ask the mother a number of questions on the child’s health. This all goes to form a large database that has come to represent the country as a whole. Pneumonia remains one of the biggest killers of children under 5 around the world today. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis.)

DHAKA CITY, BANGLADESH, AUGUST 2015: A ICDDR,B healthcare workers deals with a mother who's child is suffering from severe childhood Pneumonia. ICDDR,B is an independent, non-profit health research institute dedicated to improving the lives of people living in poverty in Bangladesh and globally. They specialize in child and adolescent health with a focus on diarrheal diseases, cholera as well as childhood pneumonia. Their urban site at Kamalapur was founded to monitor pneumonia in children through fieldworkers who are in the field every day. There are 60 field staff, 18 medical teams, and 3 researchers. These field teams are made up entirely of women as they are dealing with mothers most of the time. These field teams conduct daily surveys that relate to fever, labored breathing, lethargy, and inability to drink water, convulsions and headaches. Each fieldworker will see at least 23 patients every day, 6 days a week. If necessary, the child is then brought to the Kamalapur clinic where they are given blood tests, nebulized and given Amoxicillin if the need exists. In severe cases they are taken to the main ICDDR hospital in Dhaka. In most cases, local rickshaws will be used for transport; this is the most common means of transport in Dhaka. When a fieldworker visits a home, she will check the temperature of the child as well as the respiratory rate. She will then ask the mother a number of questions on the child’s health. This all goes to form a large database that has come to represent the country as a whole. Pneumonia remains one of the biggest killers of children under 5 around the world today. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis.)

SAO PAOLO, BRAZIL, 26 AUGUST 2014: Maria Lucia Martins Moreira, 68, has her stage 3 cataracts operated on at the prestigious Rue Domingos Arevelo Opthamology center in Sao Paolo, Brazil. Maria Lucia was operated on by Laser utilizing Alcon equipment and medication by renowned eye surgeon Dr Walton Nose'. She was included in this program because Dr Nose' is also a professor and as part of his university's outreach program to the economically challenged she was able to have her cataracts removed. The surgery took no longer than fifteen minutes per eye and Maria Lucia went home to a poorer suburb of Sao Paolo, Brazil where she was able to play with her grandchildren immediately. Maria Lucia is a devout woman who is a former School Canteen worker. She could no longer read her bible before the operation, she could not sew and she could not interact properly with her grandchildren or catch the bus without help seeing directions and place names. Maria Lucia is from a lower income family yet due to the efforts of Alcon, she has now undergone cataract surgery and is expected to make a good recovery of her sight. She is looking forward to seeing her grandchildren again more than anything. She is looking forward to rejoining her bible study class and no longer falling down the stairs. She has been very worried about her children having to take care of her. This cataract surgery will in effect free not just Maria Lucia but her whole family from the problem of cataract blindness. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage by Getty Images for Novartis.)

SAO PAOLO, BRAZIL, 26 AUGUST 2014: Maria Lucia Martins Moreira, 68, has her stage 3 cataracts operated on at the prestigious Rue Domingos Arevelo Opthamology center in Sao Paolo, Brazil. Maria Lucia was operated on by Laser utilizing Alcon equipment and medication by renowned eye surgeon Dr Walton Nose'. She was included in this program because Dr Nose' is also a professor and as part of his university's outreach program to the economically challenged she was able to have her cataracts removed. The surgery took no longer than fifteen minutes per eye and Maria Lucia went home to a poorer suburb of Sao Paolo, Brazil where she was able to play with her grandchildren immediately. Maria Lucia is a devout woman who is a former School Canteen worker. She could no longer read her bible before the operation, she could not sew and she could not interact properly with her grandchildren or catch the bus without help seeing directions and place names. Maria Lucia is from a lower income family yet due to the efforts of Alcon, she has now undergone cataract surgery and is expected to make a good recovery of her sight. She is looking forward to seeing her grandchildren again more than anything. She is looking forward to rejoining her bible study class and no longer falling down the stairs. She has been very worried about her children having to take care of her. This cataract surgery will in effect free not just Maria Lucia but her whole family from the problem of cataract blindness. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage by Getty Images for Novartis.)

SAO PAOLO, BRAZIL, 26 AUGUST 2014: Maria Lucia Martins Moreira, 68, in a rare quiet moment at home shortly after she had her stage 3 cataracts removed at the Rue Domingos Arevelo Opthamology center in Sao Paolo, Brazil. Maria Lucia was operated on by Laser utilizing Alcon equipment and medication. The surgery took no longer than fifteen minutes and Maria Lucia went home to a poorer suburb of Brzzil where she was able to play with her grandchildren immediately. Maria Lucia is a devout woman who is a former School Canteen worker. She could no longer read her bible before the operation, she could not sew and she could not interact properly with her grandchildren or catch the bus without help seeing directions and place names. Maria Lucia is from a lower income family yet due to the efforts of Alcon, she has now undergone cataract surgery and is expected to make a good recovery of her sight. She is looking forward to seeing her grandchildren again more than anything. She is looking forward to rejoining her bible study class and no longer falling down the stairs. She has been very worried about her children having to take care of her. This cataract surgery will in effect free not just Maria Lucia but her whole family from the problem of cataract blindness. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage by Getty Images for Novartis.)

SAO PAOLO, BRAZIL, 26 AUGUST 2014: Maria Lucia Martins Moreira, 68, feels out her new eyes by catching up on her sewing shortly after she had her stage 3 cataracts removed at the Rue Domingos Arevelo Opthamology center in Sao Paolo, Brazil. Maria Lucia was operated on by Laser utilizing Alcon equipment and medication. The surgery took no longer than fifteen minutes and Maria Lucia went home to a poorer suburb of Sao Paolo where she was able to play with her grandchildren immediately. Maria Lucia is a devout woman who is a former School Canteen worker. She could no longer read her bible before the operation, she could not sew and she could not interact properly with her grandchildren or catch the bus without help seeing directions and place names. Maria Lucia is from a lower income family yet due to the efforts of Alcon, she has now undergone cataract surgery and is expected to make a good recovery of her sight. She is looking forward to seeing her grandchildren again more than anything. She is looking forward to rejoining her bible study class and no longer falling down the stairs. She has been very worried about her children having to take care of her. This cataract surgery will in effect free not just Maria Lucia but her whole family from the problem of cataract blindness. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage by Getty Images for Novartis.)

CARCABUEY, ANDALUCIA, SPAIN, 11 JULY 2014: Fernando Sanchez, 84, is a longtime resident of the Andalucía village of Carcabuey in Spain along with his wife Emilia, 82. Fernando is a man who has been living with type 2 diabetes for over 30 years. As Fernando gets older, he is more careful with his diet and tries to exercise on a regular basis as well as cut back on his sugar intake. Recently Fernando was chosen to star in a short film on diabetes as part of a Novartis sponsored short film awareness campaign for Spain. Fernando is seen rejecting sugar and instead turning to dance with his onscreen partner Filomena Zamit, 86, herself a diabetes patient. They are the “sugar” in each other’s onscreen lives. Fernando has achieved some fame in the village as a result of the film and now dances as often as he is able. During this shoot he is seen in his home with his devout wife Emilia, 82, he is seen socializing and playing dominos with his friends and he is seen dancing with his dance partner Filomena on the streets of Carcabuey. He also meets up with a group of young ladies learning the Flamenco. Fernando cannot resist taking part and even takes Filomena along to a Flamenco rehearsal. Fernando has embraced a healthier lifestyle combined with the correction medication to combat his diabetes and live a longer, healthier lifestyle. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage for Novartis.)

CARCABUEY, ANDALUCIA, SPAIN, 11 JULY 2014: Fernando Sanchez, 84, is a longtime resident of the Andalucía village of Carcabuey in Spain along with his wife Emilia, 82. Fernando is a man who has been living with type 2 diabetes for over 30 years. As Fernando gets older, he is more careful with his diet and tries to exercise on a regular basis as well as cut back on his sugar intake. Recently Fernando was chosen to star in a short film on diabetes as part of a Novartis sponsored short film awareness campaign for Spain. Fernando is seen rejecting sugar and instead turning to dance with his onscreen partner Filomena Zamit, 86, herself a diabetes patient. They are the “sugar” in each other’s onscreen lives. Fernando has achieved some fame in the village as a result of the film and now dances as often as he is able. During this shoot he is seen in his home with his devout wife Emilia, 82, he is seen socializing and playing dominos with his friends and he is seen dancing with his dance partner Filomena on the streets of Carcabuey. He also meets up with a group of young ladies learning the Flamenco. Fernando cannot resist taking part and even takes Filomena along to a Flamenco rehearsal. Fernando has embraced a healthier lifestyle combined with the correction medication to combat his diabetes and live a longer, healthier lifestyle. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage for Novartis.)

CARCABUEY, ANDALUCIA, SPAIN, 11 JULY 2014: Fernando Sanchez, 84, is a longtime resident of the Andalucía village of Carcabuey in Spain along with his wife Emilia, 82. Fernando is a man who has been living with type 2 diabetes for over 30 years. As Fernando gets older, he is more careful with his diet and tries to exercise on a regular basis as well as cut back on his sugar intake. Recently Fernando was chosen to star in a short film on diabetes as part of a Novartis sponsored short film awareness campaign for Spain. Fernando is seen rejecting sugar and instead turning to dance with his onscreen partner Filomena Zamit, 86, herself a diabetes patient. They are the “sugar” in each other’s onscreen lives. Fernando has achieved some fame in the village as a result of the film and now dances as often as he is able. During this shoot he is seen in his home with his devout wife Emilia, 82, he is seen socializing and playing dominos with his friends and he is seen dancing with his dance partner Filomena on the streets of Carcabuey. He also meets up with a group of young ladies learning the Flamenco. Fernando cannot resist taking part and even takes Filomena along to a Flamenco rehearsal. Fernando has embraced a healthier lifestyle combined with the correction medication to combat his diabetes and live a longer, healthier lifestyle. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage for Novartis.)

PATNA, INDIA, 10 SEPTEMBER 2014: Elderly women with cataract blindness arrive by boat at a blindness camp along the river near Patna, India. India is estimated to have over 10 million blind people, most of whom suffer from cureable cataracts. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis)

PATNA, INDIA, 10 SEPTEMBER 2014: A group of women with eye problems crowd in to see an opthamolagist at a blindness camp along the river near Patna, India. India is estimated to have over 10 million blind people, most of whom suffer from cureable cataracts. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis)

SILIGURI, DARJEELING DISTRICT, INDIA, JULY 22 2015: Dr Janak Shah is an accomplished and prolific eye surgeon who volunteers his services to the global poor via SEE International, an NGO with a focus on curing blindness. He is seen examining and performing eye surgery at the Baba Loknath Eye Mission hospital. This is a long established religious mission that offers facilities to SEE where Janak can run a blindness camp as well as perform the surgeries required. Janak graduated from the University of Bombay in 1991, and completed his residency in ophthalmology in 1996. He’s been volunteering with SEE International as an eye surgeon since 1996, and in 2013, passed the milestone of 100 SEE expeditions. He is SEE’s most prolific doctor and has worked in places like the Peruvian Jungle, Gaza Strip, Lebanon, Mongolia, China, Brazil and many other remote locations. He has worked all over India and has performed thousands of eye surgeries, addressing every kind of illness. Janak is a proud adherent of the Jainism religion; he is a strong believer in their religious tenants of mankind being one. Janak often works with his wife Preeti, herself a talented eye surgeon. Together they are a formidable force and can work quickly on a multitude of surgeries in a single day. They have two daughters, one of 11 and the other 15. Both girls often travel with their parents on their volunteer trips for SEE and actively assistant in patient diagnosis as well as assisting their parents in surgery. Janak and Preeti both believe this gives the girls a real perspective on their place in the world and helps to bind them as a family unit. The Shahs live in Mumbai, India and run a successful eye surgery practice when they are not volunteering for SEE International. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis)

SHRI BHOJAY SARVODAYA EYE HOSPITAL, BHUJ, KUTCH, INDIA, JULY 22 2015: Eye surgeons Janak and Preeti Shah working via headlamp on a surgical operation during a powercut in this remote region of India. Dr Janak Shah is an accomplished and prolific eye surgeon who volunteers his services to the global poor via SEE International, an NGO with a focus on curing blindness. He and his wife Preeti are seen examining and performing eye surgery at the Shri Bhojay Sarvodaya Eye hospital close to the India Pakistan border. This is a new hospital that offers modern facilities to SEE where Janak can run a blindness camp as well as perform the surgeries required. Janak graduated from the University of Bombay in 1991, and completed his residency in ophthalmology in 1996. He’s been volunteering with SEE International as an eye surgeon since 1996, and in 2013, passed the milestone of 100 SEE expeditions. He is SEE’s most prolific doctor and has worked in places like the Peruvian Jungle, Gaza Strip, Lebanon, Mongolia, China, Brazil and many other remote locations. He has worked all over India and has performed thousands of eye surgeries, addressing every kind of illness. Janak is a proud adherent of the Jainism religion; he is a strong believer in their religious tenants of mankind being one. Janak often works with his wife Preeti, herself a talented eye surgeon. Together they are a formidable force and can work quickly on a multitude of surgeries in a single day. They have two daughters, one of 11 and the other 15. Both girls often travel with their parents on their volunteer trips for SEE and actively assistant in patient diagnosis as well as assisting their parents in surgery. Janak and Preeti both believe this gives the girls a real perspective on their place in the world and helps to bind them as a family unit. The Shahs live in Mumbai, India and run a successful eye surgery practice when they are not volunteering for SEE International. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis)

SILIGURI, DARJEELING DISTRICT, INDIA, JULY 22 2015: Dr Janak Shah is an accomplished and prolific eye surgeon who volunteers his services to the global poor via SEE International, an NGO with a focus on curing blindness. He is seen examining and performing eye surgery at the Baba Loknath Eye Mission hospital. This is a long established religious mission that offers facilities to SEE where Janak can run a blindness camp as well as perform the surgeries required. Janak graduated from the University of Bombay in 1991, and completed his residency in ophthalmology in 1996. He’s been volunteering with SEE International as an eye surgeon since 1996, and in 2013, passed the milestone of 100 SEE expeditions. He is SEE’s most prolific doctor and has worked in places like the Peruvian Jungle, Gaza Strip, Lebanon, Mongolia, China, Brazil and many other remote locations. He has worked all over India and has performed thousands of eye surgeries, addressing every kind of illness. Janak is a proud adherent of the Jainism religion; he is a strong believer in their religious tenants of mankind being one. Janak often works with his wife Preeti, herself a talented eye surgeon. Together they are a formidable force and can work quickly on a multitude of surgeries in a single day. They have two daughters, one of 11 and the other 15. Both girls often travel with their parents on their volunteer trips for SEE and actively assistant in patient diagnosis as well as assisting their parents in surgery. Janak and Preeti both believe this gives the girls a real perspective on their place in the world and helps to bind them as a family unit. The Shahs live in Mumbai, India and run a successful eye surgery practice when they are not volunteering for SEE International. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis)

SHRI BHOJAY SARVODAYA EYE HOSPITAL, BHUJ, KUTCH, INDIA, JULY 22 2015: Dr Janak Shah examines patients after a series of successful eye surgreries. He is an accomplished and prolific eye surgeon who volunteers his services to the global poor via SEE International, an NGO with a focus on curing blindness. He is seen examining patients after he haHe and his wife Preeti are seen examining and performing eye surgery at the Shri Bhojay Sarvodaya Eye hospital close to the India Pakistan border. This is a new hospital that offers modern facilities to SEE where Janak can run a blindness camp as well as perform the surgeries required. Janak graduated from the University of Bombay in 1991, and completed his residency in ophthalmology in 1996. He’s been volunteering with SEE International as an eye surgeon since 1996, and in 2013, passed the milestone of 100 SEE expeditions. He is SEE’s most prolific doctor and has worked in places like the Peruvian Jungle, Gaza Strip, Lebanon, Mongolia, China, Brazil and many other remote locations. He has worked all over India and has performed thousands of eye surgeries, addressing every kind of illness. Janak is a proud adherent of the Jainism religion; he is a strong believer in their religious tenants of mankind being one. Janak often works with his wife Preeti, herself a talented eye surgeon. Together they are a formidable force and can work quickly on a multitude of surgeries in a single day. They have two daughters, one of 11 and the other 15. Both girls often travel with their parents on their volunteer trips for SEE and actively assistant in patient diagnosis as well as assisting their parents in surgery. Janak and Preeti both believe this gives the girls a real perspective on their place in the world and helps to bind them as a family unit. The Shahs live in Mumbai, India and run a successful eye surgery practice when they are not volunteering for SEE International. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis)

SILIGURI, DARJEELING DISTRICT, INDIA, JULY 22 2015: Dr Janak Shah is an accomplished and prolific eye surgeon who volunteers his services to the global poor via SEE International, an NGO with a focus on curing blindness. He is seen examining and performing eye surgery at the Baba Loknath Eye Mission hospital. This is a long established religious mission that offers facilities to SEE where Janak can run a blindness camp as well as perform the surgeries required. Janak graduated from the University of Bombay in 1991, and completed his residency in ophthalmology in 1996. He’s been volunteering with SEE International as an eye surgeon since 1996, and in 2013, passed the milestone of 100 SEE expeditions. He is SEE’s most prolific doctor and has worked in places like the Peruvian Jungle, Gaza Strip, Lebanon, Mongolia, China, Brazil and many other remote locations. He has worked all over India and has performed thousands of eye surgeries, addressing every kind of illness. Janak is a proud adherent of the Jainism religion; he is a strong believer in their religious tenants of mankind being one. Janak often works with his wife Preeti, herself a talented eye surgeon. Together they are a formidable force and can work quickly on a multitude of surgeries in a single day. They have two daughters, one of 11 and the other 15. Both girls often travel with their parents on their volunteer trips for SEE and actively assistant in patient diagnosis as well as assisting their parents in surgery. Janak and Preeti both believe this gives the girls a real perspective on their place in the world and helps to bind them as a family unit. The Shahs live in Mumbai, India and run a successful eye surgery practice when they are not volunteering for SEE International. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis)

KISUMU, KENYA, 18 JUNE 2015: A mother and child under mosquito netting, a major weapon in these rural areas in the fight against Malaria. A Malaria surveilance team from the Walter Read Project on Malaria undertakes daily case studies in the Nyanza District of Kisumu, Kenya. The surveilance team will typically weight the child, take down the family details and medical history, conduct a Rapid Test for malaria, draw a blood sample and continue to monitor that child for up to a 4 year period. Their work is invaluable in providing samples to monitor the path and progress and mutation of Malaria. Seven different teams work 5 days a week, visiting 5 households per day across the Nyanza district. Agnes Akoth Onyango, 57, is the Chief Nurse of the Walter Read Project, Kisumu, Kenya. Agnes is seen at the Kemri Insectology lab where mosquitos are specifically bred for Malaria research. Agnes has been a front line nurse in the fight against Malaria for over 31 years. She administers the staff at the Walter Read research facility and also has strong relations with the Kombewa District hospital. Agnes works with a number of field surveillance teams who monitor the population of the Nyanza province of Kenya, helping to maintain and update Walter Read’s case studies of over 40 years research into Malaria. Agnes supervises the teams, works with the laboratory staff and the local hospitals in keeping an up to date record on the progress of Malaria, staying one step ahead of the disease which kills over 5 million people annually. She also works with the Kemri group of disease research facilities in the Kisumu area. These provide a valuable database for the mutation of the Malaria parasite, helping to develop effective medication to combat the disease. Agnes has devoted her life to this theme, finding self-worth and tremendous satisfaction in her work. She is well know across her community and still finds time to go with surveillance teams to build case studies as well lecture on M

KISUMU, KENYA, 21 JUNE 2015: Agnes Akoth Onyango, 57, Chief Nurse of the Walter Read Project, Kisumu, Kenya. Agnes has been a front line nurse in the fight against Malaria for over 31 years. She administers the staff at the Walter Read research facility and also has strong relations with the Kombewa District hospital. Agnes works with a number of field surveillance teams who monitor the population of the Nyanza province of Kenya, helping to maintain and update Walter Read’s case studies of over 40 years research into Malaria. Agnes supervises the teams, works with the laboratory staff and the local hospitals in keeping an up to date record on the progress of Malaria, staying one step ahead of the disease which kills over 5 million people annually. She also works with the Kemri group of disease research facilities in the Kisumu area. These provide a valuable database for the mutation of the Malaria parasite, helping to develop effective medication to combat the disease. Agnes has devoted her life to this theme, finding self-worth and tremendous satisfaction in her work. She is well know across her community and still finds time to go with surveillance teams to build case studies as well lecture on Malaria education when she can make the time. Agnes remains hopeful for the eradication of Malaria, believing a cure is within our grasp if research and funding is maintained. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis)

1. KISUMU, KENYA, 21 JUNE 2015: Agnes Akoth Onyango, 57, Chief Nurse of the Walter Read Project, Kisumu, Kenya. Agnes has been a front line nurse in the fight against Malaria for over 31 years. Here she is seen dealing with a child who has the dual complications of severe burns as well as Malaria. This has to be handled carefully as the medications can conflict with each other in the child's delicate body. Agnes has 31 years of experience with this kind of complication. Her chief role is to administer the staff at the Walter Read research facility and also has strong relations with the Kombewa District hospital. Agnes works with a number of field surveillance teams who monitor the population of the Nyanza province of Kenya, helping to maintain and update Walter Read’s case studies of over 40 years research into Malaria. Agnes supervises the teams, works with the laboratory staff and the local hospitals in keeping an up to date record on the progress of Malaria, staying one step ahead of the disease which kills over 5 million people annually. She also works with the Kemri group of disease research facilities in the Kisumu area. These provide a valuable database for the mutation of the Malaria parasite, helping to develop effective medication to combat the disease. Agnes has devoted her life to this theme, finding self-worth and tremendous satisfaction in her work. She is well know across her community and still finds time to go with surveillance teams to build case studies as well lecture on Malaria education when she can make the time. Agnes remains hopeful for the eradication of Malaria, believing a cure is within our grasp if research and funding is maintained. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis)

KISUMU, KENYA, 21 JUNE 2015: Rural homes in the rain close to the Walter Read Project, Kisumu, Kenya. Agnes Akoth Onyango, 57, Chief Nurse of the Walter Read Project, Agnes has been a front line nurse in the fight against Malaria for over 31 years. She administers the staff at the Walter Read research facility and also has strong relations with the Kombewa District hospital. Agnes works with a number of field surveillance teams who monitor the population of the Nyanza province of Kenya, helping to maintain and update Walter Read’s case studies of over 40 years research into Malaria. Agnes supervises the teams, works with the laboratory staff and the local hospitals in keeping an up to date record on the progress of Malaria, staying one step ahead of the disease which kills over 5 million people annually. She also works with the Kemri group of disease research facilities in the Kisumu area. These provide a valuable database for the mutation of the Malaria parasite, helping to develop effective medication to combat the disease. Agnes has devoted her life to this theme, finding self-worth and tremendous satisfaction in her work. She is well know across her community and still finds time to go with surveillance teams to build case studies as well lecture on Malaria education when she can make the time. Agnes remains hopeful for the eradication of Malaria, believing a cure is within our grasp if research and funding is maintained. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis)

KISUMU, KENYA, 21 JUNE 2015: Three woman from the Legion of Mary, a popular religious group in the Kisumu region of Kenya. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis)

KISUMU, KENYA, 18 JUNE 2015: A malaria surveilance team from the Walter Read Project on Malaria undertakes a case study on a young child in the Nyanza District of Kisumu, Kenya. This boy is in a febrile state, with advanced Malaria parasites attacking the red blood cells in his body. He was taken to hospital immediately after permission was obtained from the head of the household. The surveilance team will typically weight the child, take down the family details and medical history, conduct a Rapid Test for malaria, draw a blood sample and continue to monitor that child for up to a 4 year period. Their work is invaluable in providing samples to monitor the path and progress and mutation of Malaria. Seven different teams work 5 days a week, visiting 5 households per day across the Nyanza district. Agnes Akoth Onyango, 57, is the Chief Nurse of the Walter Read Project, Kisumu, Kenya. Agnes is seen at the Kemri Insectology lab where mosquitos are specifically bred for Malaria research. Agnes has been a front line nurse in the fight against Malaria for over 31 years. She administers the staff at the Walter Read research facility and also has strong relations with the Kombewa District hospital. Agnes works with a number of field surveillance teams who monitor the population of the Nyanza province of Kenya, helping to maintain and update Walter Read’s case studies of over 40 years research into Malaria. Agnes supervises the teams, works with the laboratory staff and the local hospitals in keeping an up to date record on the progress of Malaria, staying one step ahead of the disease which kills over 5 million people annually. She also works with the Kemri group of disease research facilities in the Kisumu area. These provide a valuable database for the mutation of the Malaria parasite, helping to develop effective medication to combat the disease. Agnes has devoted her life to this theme, finding self-worth and tremendous satisfaction in her work. She is well know across

KISUMU, KENYA, 18 JUNE 2015: A malaria surveilance team from the Walter Read Project on Malaria undertakes a case study on a young child in the Nyanza District of Kisumu, Kenya. They will weight the child, take down the family details and medical history, conduct a Rapid Test for malaria, draw a blood sample and continue to monitor that child for up to a 4 year period. Their work is invaluable in providing samples to monitor the path and progress and mutation of Malaria. Seven different teams work 5 days a week, visiting 5 households per day across the Nyanza district. Agnes Akoth Onyango, 57, is the Chief Nurse of the Walter Read Project, Kisumu, Kenya. Agnes is seen at the Kemri Insectology lab where mosquitos are specifically bred for Malaria research. Agnes has been a front line nurse in the fight against Malaria for over 31 years. She administers the staff at the Walter Read research facility and also has strong relations with the Kombewa District hospital. Agnes works with a number of field surveillance teams who monitor the population of the Nyanza province of Kenya, helping to maintain and update Walter Read’s case studies of over 40 years research into Malaria. Agnes supervises the teams, works with the laboratory staff and the local hospitals in keeping an up to date record on the progress of Malaria, staying one step ahead of the disease which kills over 5 million people annually. She also works with the Kemri group of disease research facilities in the Kisumu area. These provide a valuable database for the mutation of the Malaria parasite, helping to develop effective medication to combat the disease. Agnes has devoted her life to this theme, finding self-worth and tremendous satisfaction in her work. She is well know across her community and still finds time to go with surveillance teams to build case studies as well lecture on Malaria education when she can make the time. Agnes remains hopeful for the eradication of Malaria, believing a cure is withi

KISUMU, KENYA, 18 JUNE 2015: A Malaria surveilance team from the Walter Read Project on Malaria undertakes a case study on a young child in the Nyanza District of Kisumu, Kenya. They will weight the child, take down the family details and medical history, conduct a Rapid Test for malaria, draw a blood sample and continue to monitor that child for up to a 4 year period. Their work is invaluable in providing samples to monitor the path and progress and mutation of Malaria. Seven different teams work 5 days a week, visiting 5 households per day across the Nyanza district. Agnes Akoth Onyango, 57, is the Chief Nurse of the Walter Read Project, Kisumu, Kenya. Agnes is seen at the Kemri Insectology lab where mosquitos are specifically bred for Malaria research. Agnes has been a front line nurse in the fight against Malaria for over 31 years. She administers the staff at the Walter Read research facility and also has strong relations with the Kombewa District hospital. Agnes works with a number of field surveillance teams who monitor the population of the Nyanza province of Kenya, helping to maintain and update Walter Read’s case studies of over 40 years research into Malaria. Agnes supervises the teams, works with the laboratory staff and the local hospitals in keeping an up to date record on the progress of Malaria, staying one step ahead of the disease which kills over 5 million people annually. She also works with the Kemri group of disease research facilities in the Kisumu area. These provide a valuable database for the mutation of the Malaria parasite, helping to develop effective medication to combat the disease. Agnes has devoted her life to this theme, finding self-worth and tremendous satisfaction in her work. She is well know across her community and still finds time to go with surveillance teams to build case studies as well lecture on Malaria education when she can make the time. Agnes remains hopeful for the eradication of Malaria, believing a cure is withi

KISUMU, KENYA, 18 JUNE 2015: Kenyan farmer's and parents Norman and Akinyi Otieno mourn the loss of a child two weeks previously to Malaria. This is the second child they have lost to the disease. 5 million people are estimated to die annually from the disease, the rural poor of Africa are amongst the most vulnerable. Agnes Akoth Onyango, 57, is the Chief Nurse of the Walter Read Project, Kisumu, Kenya. Agnes is seen at the Kemri Insectology lab where mosquitos are specifically bred for Malaria research. Agnes has been a front line nurse in the fight against Malaria for over 31 years. She administers the staff at the Walter Read research facility and also has strong relations with the Kombewa District hospital. Agnes works with a number of field surveillance teams who monitor the population of the Nyanza province of Kenya, helping to maintain and update Walter Read’s case studies of over 40 years research into Malaria. Agnes supervises the teams, works with the laboratory staff and the local hospitals in keeping an up to date record on the progress of Malaria, staying one step ahead of the disease which kills over 5 million people annually. She also works with the Kemri group of disease research facilities in the Kisumu area. These provide a valuable database for the mutation of the Malaria parasite, helping to develop effective medication to combat the disease. Agnes has devoted her life to this theme, finding self-worth and tremendous satisfaction in her work. She is well know across her community and still finds time to go with surveillance teams to build case studies as well lecture on Malaria education when she can make the time. Agnes remains hopeful for the eradication of Malaria, believing a cure is within our grasp if research and funding is maintained. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis)

KISUMU, KENYA, 18 JUNE 2015: A mother and child under mosquito netting, a major weapon in these rural areas in the fight against Malaria. A Malaria surveilance team from the Walter Read Project on Malaria undertakes daily case studies in the Nyanza District of Kisumu, Kenya. The surveilance team will typically weight the child, take down the family details and medical history, conduct a Rapid Test for malaria, draw a blood sample and continue to monitor that child for up to a 4 year period. Their work is invaluable in providing samples to monitor the path and progress and mutation of Malaria. Seven different teams work 5 days a week, visiting 5 households per day across the Nyanza district. Agnes Akoth Onyango, 57, is the Chief Nurse of the Walter Read Project, Kisumu, Kenya. Agnes is seen at the Kemri Insectology lab where mosquitos are specifically bred for Malaria research. Agnes has been a front line nurse in the fight against Malaria for over 31 years. She administers the staff at the Walter Read research facility and also has strong relations with the Kombewa District hospital. Agnes works with a number of field surveillance teams who monitor the population of the Nyanza province of Kenya, helping to maintain and update Walter Read’s case studies of over 40 years research into Malaria. Agnes supervises the teams, works with the laboratory staff and the local hospitals in keeping an up to date record on the progress of Malaria, staying one step ahead of the disease which kills over 5 million people annually. She also works with the Kemri group of disease research facilities in the Kisumu area. These provide a valuable database for the mutation of the Malaria parasite, helping to develop effective medication to combat the disease. Agnes has devoted her life to this theme, finding self-worth and tremendous satisfaction in her work. She is well know across her community and still finds time to go with surveillance teams to build case studies as well lecture on M

KISUMU, KENYA, 21 JUNE 2015: Agnes Akoth Onyango, 57, Chief Nurse of the Walter Read Project, Kisumu, Kenya, gives an educational lecture on Malaria to schoolchildren at the Diemo primary school close to the Walter Read facility. Agnes has been a front line nurse in the fight against Malaria for over 31 years. She administers the staff at the Walter Read research facility and also has strong relations with the Kombewa District hospital. Agnes works with a number of field surveillance teams who monitor the population of the Nyanza province of Kenya, helping to maintain and update Walter Read’s case studies of over 40 years research into Malaria. Agnes supervises the teams, works with the laboratory staff and the local hospitals in keeping an up to date record on the progress of Malaria, staying one step ahead of the disease which kills over 5 million people annually. She also works with the Kemri group of disease research facilities in the Kisumu area. These provide a valuable database for the mutation of the Malaria parasite, helping to develop effective medication to combat the disease. Agnes has devoted her life to this theme, finding self-worth and tremendous satisfaction in her work. She is well know across her community and still finds time to go with surveillance teams to build case studies as well lecture on Malaria education when she can make the time. Agnes remains hopeful for the eradication of Malaria, believing a cure is within our grasp if research and funding is maintained. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis)

CHONGWE DISTRICT, ZAMBIA, 14 JANUARY 2014: Rural community health care worker Dismuss,44, updates his medical records at his home in the Chongwe district of rural Zambia. Dismuss lives a distance of 14 kilometers from the nearest clinic and services over 500 households in his area. He adminsters rapid testing for Malaria and adminsters Coartem anti-Malarials for both adults and children. Dismuss is a volunteer worker and receives no pay for this work. He has 9 children and his wife was recently diagnosed with Leukemia. Chongwe District, Zambia. (Photo by Brent Stirton for Novartis)

CHONGWE DISTRICT, ZAMBIA, 14 JANUARY 2014: Rural community health care worker Dismuss,44, holds a small Malaria care workshop in the Chongwe district of rural Zambia. Dismuss lives a distance of 14 kilometers from the nearest clinic and services over 500 households in his area. He adminsters rapid testing for Malaria and adminsters Coartem anti-Malarials for both adults and children. Dismuss is a volunteer worker and receives no pay for this work. He has 9 children and his wife was recently diagnosed with Leukemia. Chongwe District, Zambia. (Photo by Brent Stirton for Novartis)

CHONGWE DISTRICT, ZAMBIA, 14 JANUARY 2014: Rural community health care worker Dismuss,44, performs a rapid test for Malaria on a young boy in the Chongwe district in rural Zambia. Dismuss lives a distance of 14 kilometers from the nearest clinic and services over 500 households in his area. He adminsters rapid testing for Malaria and adminsters Coartem anti-Malarials for both adults and children. Dismuss is a volunteer worker and receives no pay for this work. He has 9 children and his wife was recently diagnosed with Leukemia. Chongwe District, Zambia. (Photo by Brent Stirton for Novartis)

CHONGWE DISTRICT, ZAMBIA, 14 JANUARY 2014: Rural community health care worker Dismuss,44, seen with his bicycle ambulance in the Chongwe district in rural Zambia. Dismuss lives a distance of 14 kilometers from the nearest clinic and services over 500 households in his area. He adminsters rapid testing for Malaria and adminsters Coartem anti-Malarials for both adults and children. Dismuss is a volunteer worker and receives no pay for this work. He has 9 children and his wife was recently diagnosed with Leukemia. Chongwe District, Zambia. (Photo by Brent Stirton for Novartis)

CHONGWE DISTRICT, ZAMBIA, 14 JANUARY 2014: Rural community health care worker Dismuss,44, performs a rapid test for Malaria on a young mother in the Chongwe district in rural Zambia. Dismuss lives a distance of 14 kilometers from the nearest clinic and services over 500 households in his area. He adminsters rapid testing for Malaria and adminsters Coartem anti-Malarials for both adults and children. Dismuss is a volunteer worker and receives no pay for this work. He has 9 children and his wife was recently diagnosed with Leukemia. Chongwe District, Zambia. (Photo by Brent Stirton for Novartis)

CHONGWE DISTRICT, ZAMBIA, 14 JANUARY 2014: Rural community health care worker Dismuss,44, pedals his bicycle ambulance on the way to the rural Chongwe community clinic, delivering a young boy suffering from Malaria. Dismuss lives a distance of 14 kilometers from the clinic and services over 500 households in his area. He adminsters rapid testing for Malaria and adminster Coartem anti-Malarials for both adults and children. Dismuss is a volunteer worker and receives no pay for this work. He has 9 children and his wife was recently diagnosed with Leukemia. Chongwe District, Zambia. (Photo by Brent Stirton for Novartis)

CHONGWE DISTRICT, ZAMBIA, 14 JANUARY 2014: Rural community health care nurse, Sister Betty Habulembe at work in the rural Chongwe community clinic, Zambia. Betty is testing and administering Coartem anti-Malarials to Micho Kaulwe, who is suffering from Malaria. (Photo by Brent Stirton for Novartis)

NDOLA, ZAMBIA, 16 JANUARY 2014: Lab technican Mbanga Mmleba and Dr Christine Manyando of the Tropical Disease Research center at Ndola Central Hospital, Zambia. They are seen in a Mosquito breeding facility, Mmleba is capturing Malaria bearing mosquitos for examination under the microscope. (Photo by Brent Stirton for Novartis.)

NDOLA, ZAMBIA, 16 JANUARY 2014: Lab technican Osbert Namafente of the Tropical Disease Research center at Ndola Central Hospital, Zambia. Osbert is seen examining Malaria bearing mosquitos under the microscope. This lab is seeking vectors for the disease, identifying carriers and strains of malaria from Mosquitos captured all over Zambia. (Photo by Brent Stirton for Novartis.)

NDOLA, ZAMBIA, 16 JANUARY 2014: Lab technican Mbanga Mmleba of the Tropical Disease Research center at Ndola Central Hospital, Zambia. He is seen in a Mosquito breeding facility where Mmleba is using an aspirator for capturing Malaria bearing mosquitos for examination under the microscope. This lab attempts to map vectors for the disease by identifying which mosquitos are carrying which version of the disease. (Photo by Brent Stirton for Novartis.)

NDOLA, ZAMBIA, 16 JANUARY 2014: Researcher Eric M. Njunju prepares samples to identify the DNA strand of the Malaria pathogen at the Tropical Disease Research center at Ndola Central Hospital, Zambia. This technique is the most accurate manner by which to test for Malaria. (Photo by Brent Stirton for Novartis.)

NDOLA, ZAMBIA, 16 JANUARY 2014: Dr Christine Manyando examines a young child who has severe Malaria at the Arthur Davidson Children's Hospital, Ndola, Zambia. This child's condition is so severe that she is undergoing a blood transfusion in an attempt to remove the Malaria parasite from her young body. (Photo by Brent Stirton for Novartis.)

LUSAKA, ZAMBIA, 15 JANUARY 2014: Images from the Zambian Health Ministry's Medical Storage and Distribution center in Lusaka. Anti-malarial treatments first land at this facility and from here they are stored and distributed across the country. (Photo by Brent Stirton for Novartis.)

KISUMU, KENYA, 21 JUNE 2015: Sister Pheobe Odera suffers from both Diabetes and Hypertension but struggles to find medication despite working in a district hospital. She claims she is growing weaker and a simple cold can see her bed-ridden. Diabetes is on the rise in Africa, where non-communicable diseases are rising steadily, adding to the strain the more traditional diseases already place on populations. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis)

CHONGWE DISTRICT HOSPITAL, ZAMBIA, 14 JANUARY 2014: Child patient Blessings Nanyangwe is examined by doctors inside the malaria ward inside Chongwe District Hospital, Zambia. Blessing was brought in to the hospital five days previously with critical Malaria. Swift treatment with Coartem and a quinine solution has stabilized her and rid her body of the Malaria parasites. She is due to be discharged today. (Photo by Brent Stirton for Novartis)

PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA, USA, 15 JULY 2015: Dr Carl June, head of the Cart19 cancer program at UPenn surveys the Philadelphia skyline from the construction platform for his new laboratory. The lab is being built with help from Novartis who have supported Dr June for a number of years. Dr June has pioneered new Gene therapy in the search for a cure for cancer, revolutionizing how we may come to conquer the disease. He and his team have developed a means by which to use the HIV virus as a targeting vector for cancer cells, allowing the patients own T-cells to go to war once they have been turned into super cells and re-injected into the patients body. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis.)

MORRIS PLAINS, NEW JERSEY, 9 JULY 2015: Research scientists process human T cells inside the cell processing facility at the Morris Plains, New Jersey Novartis facility. This laboratory is where the T cells of cancer patients are processed and turned into super cells as part of a revolutionary new Gene therapy based cancer treatment Novartis is a part of. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis.)

PHILADELPHIA, PA, 7 JUNE 2014: Doug Olson, 67, had been living with chronic lymphocytic leukemia, or CLL, for 14 years. By 2010, after four rounds of chemotherapy, his only option seemed to be a bone marrow transplant with a 50 percent chance of success. That's when he became Upenn’s Patient Number Three in a gene therapy experiment designed to manipulate his immune system. The weapon is drawn from a patient's own body. Doctors at the University of Pennsylvania remove "T cells," or white blood cells that help fight infections. The cells are then genetically modified to recognize and attack cancer cells. One amazing aspect is the use of a modified HIV virus as a delivery system for the modified T cells. "The T cell can grow and divide," says oncologist Dr. David Porter, who is part of the team overseeing the therapy. "In fact, we've seen for every T cell that we genetically modify and put into a patient's body, it has the ability to kill up to 93,000 leukemia cells." In Olson's case, it took just three weeks to work. More than three years later, Olson is still in complete remission, and the modified T cells are still circulating. The hope is to use this same technique to make other types of cancer cells more visible to the body's immune system. At this time the UPenn medical team have a 86% success rate with this gene therapy in over 150 patients, signifying what is perhaps the greatest breakthrough yet in the fight against cancer. Doug Olson has been clear of cancer for over 4 years now. The first thing he did when he heard he was clear of cancer cells, was to go out and buy a boat. He enjoys sailing that with his grandkids, he runs regularly, maintains a healthy lifestyle and is a passionate advocate for this revolutionary cancer therapy. He spoke recently with Pennsylvania State legislators as the value of the program. Doug is a former Scientist by profession and is well qualified to speak on this treatment, both with the scientists and doctors at Upenn and als

PHILADELPHIA, PA, 7 JUNE 2014: Doug Olson, 67, had been living with chronic lymphocytic leukemia, or CLL, for 14 years. By 2010, after four rounds of chemotherapy, his only option seemed to be a bone marrow transplant with a 50 percent chance of success. That's when he became Upenn’s Patient Number Three in a gene therapy experiment designed to manipulate his immune system. The weapon is drawn from a patient's own body. Doctors at the University of Pennsylvania remove "T cells," or white blood cells that help fight infections. The cells are then genetically modified to recognize and attack cancer cells. One amazing aspect is the use of a modified HIV virus as a delivery system for the modified T cells. "The T cell can grow and divide," says oncologist Dr. David Porter, who is part of the team overseeing the therapy. "In fact, we've seen for every T cell that we genetically modify and put into a patient's body, it has the ability to kill up to 93,000 leukemia cells." In Olson's case, it took just three weeks to work. More than three years later, Olson is still in complete remission, and the modified T cells are still circulating. The hope is to use this same technique to make other types of cancer cells more visible to the body's immune system. At this time the UPenn medical team have a 86% success rate with this gene therapy in over 150 patients, signifying what is perhaps the greatest breakthrough yet in the fight against cancer. Doug Olson has been clear of cancer for over 4 years now. The first thing he did when he heard he was clear of cancer cells, was to go out and buy a boat. He enjoys sailing that with his grandkids, he runs regularly, maintains a healthy lifestyle and is a passionate advocate for this revolutionary cancer therapy. He spoke recently with Pennsylvania State legislators as the value of the program. Doug is a former Scientist by profession and is well qualified to speak on this treatment, both with the scientists and doctors at Upenn and als

PENNSYLVANIA, PA, 8 JUNE 2014: Emily Whitehead is a former Leukemia patient who at age 7 became Patient Zero in a revolutionary UPenn Medical gene therapy experiment designed to manipulate her immune system. Emily is seen with her parent Tom and Kari, since her remission Emily likes to spend time riding her ATV bike, hanging out with her dog and recently tried horse-riding for the first time. She has gone from being a final stage Cancer case to living life as a normal girl. The weapon which cured her is drawn from a patient's own body. Doctors at the University of Pennsylvania remove "T cells," or white blood cells that help fight infections. The cells are then genetically modified to recognize and attack cancer cells. One amazing aspect is the use of a modified HIV virus as a delivery system for the modified T cells. "The T cell can grow and divide," says oncologist Dr. David Porter, who is part of the team overseeing the therapy. "In fact, we've seen for every T cell that we genetically modify and put into a patient's body, it has the ability to kill up to 93,000 leukemia cells. These are words from a blog the Whitehead family put out to illuminate Emily's case: "Hi, I’m Emily! On Friday, May 28, 2010, just a few weeks after my 5th birthday, I was diagnosed with standard risk pre-b acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) at Hershey Medical Center. I was supposed to get chemotherapy treatments for 26 months and doctors said I had an 85%-90% chance of being cured; however, on October 6, 2011 I found out my leukemia relapsed and then they told me I only had a 30% chance of being cured. I received aggressive chemotherapy through January 2012 and was scheduled for a bone marrow transplant in February 2012; however, I found out on February 4, 2012, just two weeks before my transplant, that I relapsed again. Doctors tried more chemotherapy through the months of February and March but could not get me back into remission. At that point, doctors said that I was not going

PENNSYLVANIA, PA, 8 JUNE 2014: Emily Whitehead is a former Leukemia patient who at age 7 became Patient Zero in a revolutionary UPenn Medical gene therapy experiment designed to manipulate her immune system. Emily is seen with her parent Tom and Kari, since her remission Emily likes to spend time riding her ATV bike, hanging out with her dog and recently tried horse-riding for the first time. She has gone from being a final stage Cancer case to living life as a normal girl. The weapon which cured her is drawn from a patient's own body. Doctors at the University of Pennsylvania remove "T cells," or white blood cells that help fight infections. The cells are then genetically modified to recognize and attack cancer cells. One amazing aspect is the use of a modified HIV virus as a delivery system for the modified T cells. "The T cell can grow and divide," says oncologist Dr. David Porter, who is part of the team overseeing the therapy. "In fact, we've seen for every T cell that we genetically modify and put into a patient's body, it has the ability to kill up to 93,000 leukemia cells. These are words from a blog the Whitehead family put out to illuminate Emily's case: "Hi, I’m Emily! On Friday, May 28, 2010, just a few weeks after my 5th birthday, I was diagnosed with standard risk pre-b acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) at Hershey Medical Center. I was supposed to get chemotherapy treatments for 26 months and doctors said I had an 85%-90% chance of being cured; however, on October 6, 2011 I found out my leukemia relapsed and then they told me I only had a 30% chance of being cured. I received aggressive chemotherapy through January 2012 and was scheduled for a bone marrow transplant in February 2012; however, I found out on February 4, 2012, just two weeks before my transplant, that I relapsed again. Doctors tried more chemotherapy through the months of February and March but could not get me back into remission. At that point, doctors said that I was not going

PENNSYLVANIA, PA, 8 JUNE 2014: Emily Whitehead is a former Leukemia patient who at age 7 became Patient Zero in a revolutionary UPenn Medical gene therapy experiment designed to manipulate her immune system. Emily is seen with her parent Tom and Kari, since her remission Emily likes to spend time riding her ATV bike, hanging out with her dog and recently tried horse-riding for the first time. She has gone from being a final stage Cancer case to living life as a normal girl. The weapon which cured her is drawn from a patient's own body. Doctors at the University of Pennsylvania remove "T cells," or white blood cells that help fight infections. The cells are then genetically modified to recognize and attack cancer cells. One amazing aspect is the use of a modified HIV virus as a delivery system for the modified T cells. "The T cell can grow and divide," says oncologist Dr. David Porter, who is part of the team overseeing the therapy. "In fact, we've seen for every T cell that we genetically modify and put into a patient's body, it has the ability to kill up to 93,000 leukemia cells. These are words from a blog the Whitehead family put out to illuminate Emily's case: "Hi, I’m Emily! On Friday, May 28, 2010, just a few weeks after my 5th birthday, I was diagnosed with standard risk pre-b acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) at Hershey Medical Center. I was supposed to get chemotherapy treatments for 26 months and doctors said I had an 85%-90% chance of being cured; however, on October 6, 2011 I found out my leukemia relapsed and then they told me I only had a 30% chance of being cured. I received aggressive chemotherapy through January 2012 and was scheduled for a bone marrow transplant in February 2012; however, I found out on February 4, 2012, just two weeks before my transplant, that I relapsed again. Doctors tried more chemotherapy through the months of February and March but could not get me back into remission. At that point, doctors said that I was not going

PENNSYLVANIA, PA, 8 JUNE 2014: Emily Whitehead is a former Leukemia patient who at age 7 became Patient Zero in a revolutionary UPenn Medical gene therapy experiment designed to manipulate her immune system. Emily is seen with her parent Tom and Kari, since her remission Emily likes to spend time riding her ATV bike, hanging out with her dog and recently tried horse-riding for the first time. She has gone from being a final stage Cancer case to living life as a normal girl. The weapon which cured her is drawn from a patient's own body. Doctors at the University of Pennsylvania remove "T cells," or white blood cells that help fight infections. The cells are then genetically modified to recognize and attack cancer cells. One amazing aspect is the use of a modified HIV virus as a delivery system for the modified T cells. "The T cell can grow and divide," says oncologist Dr. David Porter, who is part of the team overseeing the therapy. "In fact, we've seen for every T cell that we genetically modify and put into a patient's body, it has the ability to kill up to 93,000 leukemia cells. These are words from a blog the Whitehead family put out to illuminate Emily's case: "Hi, I’m Emily! On Friday, May 28, 2010, just a few weeks after my 5th birthday, I was diagnosed with standard risk pre-b acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) at Hershey Medical Center. I was supposed to get chemotherapy treatments for 26 months and doctors said I had an 85%-90% chance of being cured; however, on October 6, 2011 I found out my leukemia relapsed and then they told me I only had a 30% chance of being cured. I received aggressive chemotherapy through January 2012 and was scheduled for a bone marrow transplant in February 2012; however, I found out on February 4, 2012, just two weeks before my transplant, that I relapsed again. Doctors tried more chemotherapy through the months of February and March but could not get me back into remission. At that point, doctors said that I was not going

PHILIDELPHIA, PA, USA, 9 JUNE 2014: Oncologist Dr. David Porter is part of the UPenn team overseeing the radical new cancer treatment therapy for the Cart 19 program. The treatment is based on a gene therapy experiment designed to manipulate the bodies own immune system. The weapon is drawn from a patient's own body. Doctors at the University of Pennsylvania remove "T cells," or white blood cells that help fight infections. The cells are then genetically modified to recognize and attack cancer cells. One amazing aspect is the use of a modified HIV virus as a delivery system for the modified T cells. "The T cell can grow and divide," says oncologist Dr. David Porter, who is part of the team overseeing the therapy. "In fact, we've seen for every T cell that we genetically modify and put into a patient's body, it has the ability to kill up to 93,000 leukemia cells." The hope is to use this same technique to make other types of cancer cells more visible to the body's immune system. At this time the UPenn medical team have a 86% success rate with this gene therapy in over 150 patients, signifying what is perhaps the greatest breakthrough yet in the fight against cancer. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage for Novartis.)

TROY, NEW YORK, 5 MAY 2014: Esme' Savoie, 3, suffers from a rare genetic disease know as PCDH19, a genetically mutated orphan disease of the kind which Novartis's N.I.B.R division feels they can learn a great deal, Troy, NY, 5 May 2014. Esme' is seen on her way to a a check up at Boston Childrens Hospital. She has a feeding tube which is permanently implanted in her stomach through which she receives all her meals. Esme's parents Hillary and Andre Savoie have become experts in Esme's syndrome and are involved in fundraising for continued research and are a study case for Boston Childrens hospital and Novartis. PCDH19 Female Limited Epilepsy has been diagnosed in approximately 200 girls and women worldwide. PCDH19 FLE have been associated with the occurrence of epilepsy, a spectrum of developmental delays, and behavioral issues that occur almost exclusively in girls and women. Novartis is one of the few big pharmaceutical companies which is doing extensive research into diseases of the brain. This is particularly important now as autism numbers are increasing and it is estimated that as many as 1 in 50 children is currently affected by this syndrome in one from or another. Novartis has made remarkable strides in their developments and Ricardo Dolmetsch, head of research, feels confident of major breakthroughs in the next few years. PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) has a spectrum of symptoms. Almost all of the girls affected by PCDH19 mutations exhibit seizures of many types, but the most typical characteristic of PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) is the tendency of the seizures to cluster and interfere with breathing (causing cyanotic spells). Some of the girls affected with PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) have cognitive delays, much of the research indicates that about two-thirds of the girls have Intellectual Delay (ID) ranging from mild to moderate. Additionally, about 40% of the girls with PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) are on the autism spectrum. Many of those with PCDH19 also exhibit behavioral and psychological prob

TROY, NEW YORK, 5 MAY 2014: Esme' Savoie, 3, suffers from a rare genetic disease know as PCDH19, a genetically mutated orphan disease of the kind which Novartis's N.I.B.R division feels they can learn a great deal, Troy, NY, 5 May 2014. Esme' is seen at Boston Childrens Hospital at her first ever dentists appointment. Esme's parents Hillary and Andre Savoie have become experts in Esme's syndrome and are involved in fundraising for continued research and are a study case for Boston Childrens hospital and Novartis. PCDH19 Female Limited Epilepsy has been diagnosed in approximately 200 girls and women worldwide. PCDH19 FLE have been associated with the occurrence of epilepsy, a spectrum of developmental delays, and behavioral issues that occur almost exclusively in girls and women. Novartis is one of the few big pharmaceutical companies which is doing extensive research into diseases of the brain. This is particularly important now as autism numbers are increasing and it is estimated that as many as 1 in 50 children is currently affected by this syndrome in one from or another. Novartis has made remarkable strides in their developments and Ricardo Dolmetsch, head of research, feels confident of major breakthroughs in the next few years. PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) has a spectrum of symptoms. Almost all of the girls affected by PCDH19 mutations exhibit seizures of many types, but the most typical characteristic of PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) is the tendency of the seizures to cluster and interfere with breathing (causing cyanotic spells). Some of the girls affected with PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) have cognitive delays, much of the research indicates that about two-thirds of the girls have Intellectual Delay (ID) ranging from mild to moderate. Additionally, about 40% of the girls with PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) are on the autism spectrum. Many of those with PCDH19 also exhibit behavioral and psychological problems including aggression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and, in some cases, schizophrenia. PCDH19

TROY, NEW YORK, 5 MAY 2014: Hillary Savoie takes her daughter outside for a bubble blowing session at their home in Troy, New york. Esme' Savoie, 3, suffers from a rare genetic disease know as PCDH19, a genetically mutated orphan disease of the kind which Novartis's N.I.B.R division feels they can learn a great deal, Troy, NY, 5 May 2014. Esme's parents Hillary and Andre Savoie have become experts in Esme's syndrome and are involved in fundraising for continued research and are a study case for Boston Childrens hospital and Novartis. PCDH19 Female Limited Epilepsy has been diagnosed in approximately 200 girls and women worldwide. PCDH19 FLE have been associated with the occurrence of epilepsy, a spectrum of developmental delays, and behavioral issues that occur almost exclusively in girls and women. Novartis is one of the few big pharmaceutical companies which is doing extensive research into diseases of the brain. This is particularly important now as autism numbers are increasing and it is estimated that as many as 1 in 50 children is currently affected by this syndrome in one from or another. Novartis has made remarkable strides in their developments and Ricardo Dolmetsch, head of research, feels confident of major breakthroughs in the next few years. PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) has a spectrum of symptoms. Almost all of the girls affected by PCDH19 mutations exhibit seizures of many types, but the most typical characteristic of PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) is the tendency of the seizures to cluster and interfere with breathing (causing cyanotic spells). Some of the girls affected with PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) have cognitive delays, much of the research indicates that about two-thirds of the girls have Intellectual Delay (ID) ranging from mild to moderate. Additionally, about 40% of the girls with PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) are on the autism spectrum. Many of those with PCDH19 also exhibit behavioral and psychological problems including aggression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and, in some cases,

TROY, NEW YORK, 5 MAY 2014: Hillary Savoie takes her daughter outside for a bubble blowing session at their home in Troy, New york. Esme' Savoie, 3, suffers from a rare genetic disease know as PCDH19, a genetically mutated orphan disease of the kind which Novartis's N.I.B.R division feels they can learn a great deal, Troy, NY, 5 May 2014. Esme's parents Hillary and Andre Savoie have become experts in Esme's syndrome and are involved in fundraising for continued research and are a study case for Boston Childrens hospital and Novartis. PCDH19 Female Limited Epilepsy has been diagnosed in approximately 200 girls and women worldwide. PCDH19 FLE have been associated with the occurrence of epilepsy, a spectrum of developmental delays, and behavioral issues that occur almost exclusively in girls and women. Novartis is one of the few big pharmaceutical companies which is doing extensive research into diseases of the brain. This is particularly important now as autism numbers are increasing and it is estimated that as many as 1 in 50 children is currently affected by this syndrome in one from or another. Novartis has made remarkable strides in their developments and Ricardo Dolmetsch, head of research, feels confident of major breakthroughs in the next few years. PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) has a spectrum of symptoms. Almost all of the girls affected by PCDH19 mutations exhibit seizures of many types, but the most typical characteristic of PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) is the tendency of the seizures to cluster and interfere with breathing (causing cyanotic spells). Some of the girls affected with PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) have cognitive delays, much of the research indicates that about two-thirds of the girls have Intellectual Delay (ID) ranging from mild to moderate. Additionally, about 40% of the girls with PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) are on the autism spectrum. Many of those with PCDH19 also exhibit behavioral and psychological problems including aggression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and, in some cases,

TROY, NEW YORK, 5 MAY 2014: Esme' Savoie, 3, suffers from a rare genetic disease know as PCDH19, a genetically mutated orphan disease of the kind which Novartis's N.I.B.R division feels they can learn a great deal, Troy, NY, 5 May 2014. Esme' is seen interacting with her grandfather and step-granmother on their small holding in upstate NY. Esme's parents Hillary and Andre Savoie have become experts in Esme's syndrome and are involved in fundraising for continued research and are a study case for Boston Childrens hospital and Novartis. PCDH19 Female Limited Epilepsy has been diagnosed in approximately 200 girls and women worldwide. PCDH19 FLE have been associated with the occurrence of epilepsy, a spectrum of developmental delays, and behavioral issues that occur almost exclusively in girls and women. Novartis is one of the few big pharmaceutical companies which is doing extensive research into diseases of the brain. This is particularly important now as autism numbers are increasing and it is estimated that as many as 1 in 50 children is currently affected by this syndrome in one from or another. Novartis has made remarkable strides in their developments and Ricardo Dolmetsch, head of research, feels confident of major breakthroughs in the next few years. PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) has a spectrum of symptoms. Almost all of the girls affected by PCDH19 mutations exhibit seizures of many types, but the most typical characteristic of PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) is the tendency of the seizures to cluster and interfere with breathing (causing cyanotic spells). Some of the girls affected with PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) have cognitive delays, much of the research indicates that about two-thirds of the girls have Intellectual Delay (ID) ranging from mild to moderate. Additionally, about 40% of the girls with PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) are on the autism spectrum. Many of those with PCDH19 also exhibit behavioral and psychological problems including aggression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and, in some cases,

TROY, NEW YORK, 5 MAY 2014: Esme' Savoie, 3, suffers from a rare genetic disease know as PCDH19, a genetically mutated orphan disease of the kind which Novartis's N.I.B.R division feels they can learn a great deal, Troy, NY, 5 May 2014. Esme' is seen with her granmother Mel and step grandfather Phil on their sheep farm in upstate NY. Esme's parents Hillary and Andre Savoie have become experts in Esme's syndrome and are involved in fundraising for continued research and are a study case for Boston Childrens hospital and Novartis. PCDH19 Female Limited Epilepsy has been diagnosed in approximately 200 girls and women worldwide. PCDH19 FLE have been associated with the occurrence of epilepsy, a spectrum of developmental delays, and behavioral issues that occur almost exclusively in girls and women. Novartis is one of the few big pharmaceutical companies which is doing extensive research into diseases of the brain. This is particularly important now as autism numbers are increasing and it is estimated that as many as 1 in 50 children is currently affected by this syndrome in one from or another. Novartis has made remarkable strides in their developments and Ricardo Dolmetsch, head of research, feels confident of major breakthroughs in the next few years. PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) has a spectrum of symptoms. Almost all of the girls affected by PCDH19 mutations exhibit seizures of many types, but the most typical characteristic of PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) is the tendency of the seizures to cluster and interfere with breathing (causing cyanotic spells). Some of the girls affected with PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) have cognitive delays, much of the research indicates that about two-thirds of the girls have Intellectual Delay (ID) ranging from mild to moderate. Additionally, about 40% of the girls with PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) are on the autism spectrum. Many of those with PCDH19 also exhibit behavioral and psychological problems including aggression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and, in some cases, schiz

TROY, NEW YORK, 5 MAY 2014: Esme' Savoie, 3, suffers from a rare genetic disease know as PCDH19, a genetically mutated orphan disease of the kind which Novartis's N.I.B.R division feels they can learn a great deal, Troy, NY, 5 May 2014. Esme's is seen with her parents Hillary and Andre Savoie who have become experts in Esme's syndrome and are involved in fundraising for continued research and are a study case for Boston Childrens hospital and Novartis. PCDH19 Female Limited Epilepsy has been diagnosed in approximately 200 girls and women worldwide. PCDH19 FLE have been associated with the occurrence of epilepsy, a spectrum of developmental delays, and behavioral issues that occur almost exclusively in girls and women. Novartis is one of the few big pharmaceutical companies which is doing extensive research into diseases of the brain. This is particularly important now as autism numbers are increasing and it is estimated that as many as 1 in 50 children is currently affected by this syndrome in one from or another. Novartis has made remarkable strides in their developments and Ricardo Dolmetsch, head of research, feels confident of major breakthroughs in the next few years. PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) has a spectrum of symptoms. Almost all of the girls affected by PCDH19 mutations exhibit seizures of many types, but the most typical characteristic of PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) is the tendency of the seizures to cluster and interfere with breathing (causing cyanotic spells). Some of the girls affected with PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) have cognitive delays, much of the research indicates that about two-thirds of the girls have Intellectual Delay (ID) ranging from mild to moderate. Additionally, about 40% of the girls with PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) are on the autism spectrum. Many of those with PCDH19 also exhibit behavioral and psychological problems including aggression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and, in some cases, schizophrenia. PCDH19 FLE may also cause hypotonia/ PCDH19 refers to a gene located

YAROSLAVL, RUSSIA, 15 MAY 2014: Nikolay Ivanovich Platonova, 82, and his wife Galina Vasilevna, 78, are both in the Novartis sponsored hypertension program at Yaroslavl Veterans Hospital in Russia. They have tried to remain healthy their whole lives but education and effective medication for healthy living and hypertension has been scarce in the region. Nikolay spent many years in the Soviet military and he continues to do his daily excercises from that period every day. Galina tries to feed them both healthy foods on a daily basis, with fruit when they can get it. They like to walk outside as part of their routine. Both Nikolay and Galina began seeing Dr Evgeniy Bybihin at the Yaroslavl Veterans Hospital as part of their treatment for hypertension. He has been instrumental in running a Novartis sponsored hypertension program for the hospital, this has seen patients admitted for up to three weeks for monitoring, education on hypertension and the use of correct medication. This program has seen a dramatic improvement in all of these areas in the Yaroslavl region as awareness of hypertension has improved not only amongst patients but also across the medical profession. Nikolay and Galina say that they now monitor their blood pressure on a regular basis and take their medication exactly as instructed. They feel better much better as a result and try to persuade their friends as to the benefits of a good education on the issue of hypertension. Novartis is involved in a number of initiatives across Russia. These include large scale facility buidling as well as partnerships with healthcare organisations and government. As part of the Yaroslavl healthcare systems improvement partnership project, Novartis is collaborating with the regional government of Yaroslavl in Russia, key clinicians and institutions to improve the diagnosis, screening and treatment of hypertension and reduce preventable death and disability from cardiovascular events. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage

YAROSLAVL, RUSSIA, 15 MAY 2014: Nikolay Ivanovich Platonova, 82, and his wife Galina Vasilevna, 78, are both in the Novartis sponsored hypertension program at Yaroslavl Veterans Hospital in Russia. They have tried to remain healthy their whole lives but education and effective medication for healthy living and hypertension has been scarce in the region. Nikolay spent many years in the Soviet military and he continues to do his daily excercises from that period every day. Galina tries to feed them both healthy foods on a daily basis, with fruit when they can get it. They like to walk outside as part of their routine. Both Nikolay and Galina began seeing Dr Evgeniy Bybihin at the Yaroslavl Veterans Hospital as part of their treatment for hypertension. He has been instrumental in running a Novartis sponsored hypertension program for the hospital, this has seen patients admitted for up to three weeks for monitoring, education on hypertension and the use of correct medication. This program has seen a dramatic improvement in all of these areas in the Yaroslavl region as awareness of hypertension has improved not only amongst patients but also across the medical profession. Nikolay and Galina say that they now monitor their blood pressure on a regular basis and take their medication exactly as instructed. They feel better much better as a result and try to persuade their friends as to the benefits of a good education on the issue of hypertension. Novartis is involved in a number of initiatives across Russia. These include large scale facility buidling as well as partnerships with healthcare organisations and government. As part of the Yaroslavl healthcare systems improvement partnership project, Novartis is collaborating with the regional government of Yaroslavl in Russia, key clinicians and institutions to improve the diagnosis, screening and treatment of hypertension and reduce preventable death and disability from cardiovascular events. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage

YAROSLAVL, RUSSIA, 14 MAY 2014: Scenes from a classroom of hypertension patients in the excercise studio at Yaroslavl Veterans Hospital, Russia. These classes preach proper excercise as one aspect of a regime to combat hypertension in Russia today. They are part of a Novartis sponsored program at the hospital designed to bring a greater awareness and education to hypertension issues in the region. Novartis is involved in a number of initiatives across Russia. These include large scale facility buidling as well as partnerships with healthcare organisations and government. As part of the Yaroslavl healthcare systems improvement partnership project, Novartis is collaborating with the regional government of Yaroslavl in Russia, key clinicians and institutions to improve the diagnosis, screening and treatment of hypertension and reduce preventable death and disability from cardiovascular events. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage for Novartis.)

YAROSLAVL, RUSSIA, 15 MAY 2014: Nikolay Ivanovich Platonova, 82, and his wife Galina Vasilevna, 78, are both in the Novartis sponsored hypertension program at Yaroslavl Veterans Hospital in Russia. They have tried to remain healthy their whole lives but education and effective medication for healthy living and hypertension has been scarce in the region. Nikolay spent many years in the Soviet military and he continues to do his daily excercises from that period every day. Galina tries to feed them both healthy foods on a daily basis, with fruit when they can get it. They like to walk outside as part of their routine. Both Nikolay and Galina began seeing Dr Evgeniy Bybihin at the Yaroslavl Veterans Hospital as part of their treatment for hypertension. He has been instrumental in running a Novartis sponsored hypertension program for the hospital, this has seen patients admitted for up to three weeks for monitoring, education on hypertension and the use of correct medication. This program has seen a dramatic improvement in all of these areas in the Yaroslavl region as awareness of hypertension has improved not only amongst patients but also across the medical profession. Nikolay and Galina say that they now monitor their blood pressure on a regular basis and take their medication exactly as instructed. They feel better much better as a result and try to persuade their friends as to the benefits of a good education on the issue of hypertension. Novartis is involved in a number of initiatives across Russia. These include large scale facility buidling as well as partnerships with healthcare organisations and government. As part of the Yaroslavl healthcare systems improvement partnership project, Novartis is collaborating with the regional government of Yaroslavl in Russia, key clinicians and institutions to improve the diagnosis, screening and treatment of hypertension and reduce preventable death and disability from cardiovascular events. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage

YAROSLAVL, RUSSIA, 15 MAY 2014: Nikolay Ivanovich Platonova, 82, and his wife Galina Vasilevna, 78, are both in the Novartis sponsored hypertension program at Yaroslavl Veterans Hospital in Russia. They have tried to remain healthy their whole lives but education and effective medication for healthy living and hypertension has been scarce in the region. Nikolay spent many years in the Soviet military and he continues to do his daily excercises from that period every day. Galina tries to feed them both healthy foods on a daily basis, with fruit when they can get it. They like to walk outside as part of their routine. Both Nikolay and Galina began seeing Dr Evgeniy Bybihin at the Yaroslavl Veterans Hospital as part of their treatment for hypertension. He has been instrumental in running a Novartis sponsored hypertension program for the hospital, this has seen patients admitted for up to three weeks for monitoring, education on hypertension and the use of correct medication. This program has seen a dramatic improvement in all of these areas in the Yaroslavl region as awareness of hypertension has improved not only amongst patients but also across the medical profession. Nikolay and Galina say that they now monitor their blood pressure on a regular basis and take their medication exactly as instructed. They feel better much better as a result and try to persuade their friends as to the benefits of a good education on the issue of hypertension. Novartis is involved in a number of initiatives across Russia. These include large scale facility buidling as well as partnerships with healthcare organisations and government. As part of the Yaroslavl healthcare systems improvement partnership project, Novartis is collaborating with the regional government of Yaroslavl in Russia, key clinicians and institutions to improve the diagnosis, screening and treatment of hypertension and reduce preventable death and disability from cardiovascular events. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage

YAROSLAVL, RUSSIA, 15 MAY 2014: Tamara Ivanovna Yachmentseva, 77, had a heart attack five years ago. She has been a kindergarten teacher for the last 55 years, building a facility in her local area of Yaroslavl and caring for multiple generations of children for over half a century. Tamara has tried to be healthy her whole life but education on healthy living and hypertension has been scarce in her region. When she had a heart attack Tamara begain seeing Dr Evgeniy Bybihin at the Yaroslavl Veterans Hospital. He has been instrumental in running a Novartis sponsored hypertension program for the hospital, this has seen patients admitted for up to three weeks for monitoring, education on hypertension and the use of correct medication. This program has seen a dramatic improvement in all of these areas in the Yaroslavl region as awareness of hypertension has improved not only amongst patients but also across the medical profession. Tamara says this program has been invaluable to her: "If my heart keeps going, I can do anything." Novartis is involved in a number of initiatives across Russia. These include large scale facility buidling as well as partnerships with healthcare organisations and government. As part of the Yaroslavl healthcare systems improvement partnership project, Novartis is collaborating with the regional government of Yaroslavl in Russia, key clinicians and institutions to improve the diagnosis, screening and treatment of hypertension and reduce preventable death and disability from cardiovascular events. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage for Novartis.)

YAROSLAVL, RUSSIA, 15 MAY 2014: Tamara Ivanovna Yachmentseva, 77, had a heart attack five years ago. She has been a kindergarten teacher for the last 55 years, building a facility in her local area of Yaroslavl and caring for multiple generations of children for over half a century. Tamara has tried to be healthy her whole life but education on healthy living and hypertension has been scarce in her region. When she had a heart attack Tamara begain seeing Dr Evgeniy Bybihin at the Yaroslavl Veterans Hospital. He has been instrumental in running a Novartis sponsored hypertension program for the hospital, this has seen patients admitted for up to three weeks for monitoring, education on hypertension and the use of correct medication. This program has seen a dramatic improvement in all of these areas in the Yaroslavl region as awareness of hypertension has improved not only amongst patients but also across the medical profession. Tamara says this program has been invaluable to her: "If my heart keeps going, I can do anything." Novartis is involved in a number of initiatives across Russia. These include large scale facility buidling as well as partnerships with healthcare organisations and government. As part of the Yaroslavl healthcare systems improvement partnership project, Novartis is collaborating with the regional government of Yaroslavl in Russia, key clinicians and institutions to improve the diagnosis, screening and treatment of hypertension and reduce preventable death and disability from cardiovascular events. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage for Novartis.)

YAROSLAVL, RUSSIA, 15 MAY 2014: Tamara Ivanovna Yachmentseva, 77, had a heart attack five years ago. She has been a kindergarten teacher for the last 55 years, building a facility in her local area of Yaroslavl and caring for multiple generations of children for over half a century. Tamara has tried to be healthy her whole life but education on healthy living and hypertension has been scarce in her region. When she had a heart attack Tamara begain seeing Dr Evgeniy Bybihin at the Yaroslavl Veterans Hospital. He has been instrumental in running a Novartis sponsored hypertension program for the hospital, this has seen patients admitted for up to three weeks for monitoring, education on hypertension and the use of correct medication. This program has seen a dramatic improvement in all of these areas in the Yaroslavl region as awareness of hypertension has improved not only amongst patients but also across the medical profession. Tamara says this program has been invaluable to her: "If my heart keeps going, I can do anything." Novartis is involved in a number of initiatives across Russia. These include large scale facility buidling as well as partnerships with healthcare organisations and government. As part of the Yaroslavl healthcare systems improvement partnership project, Novartis is collaborating with the regional government of Yaroslavl in Russia, key clinicians and institutions to improve the diagnosis, screening and treatment of hypertension and reduce preventable death and disability from cardiovascular events. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage for Novartis.)

BRIGHTON, MICHIGAN, USA, 25 MAY 2014: Ryan Groves is 27 years old and lives in Brighton, Michigan, where he participates in the Special Olympics while living with Tuberous Sclerosis. He is a track and field athlete and has won many medals at the Special Olympics. Some of Ryan’s resulting disorders associated with TSC include renal angiomyolipomas and mild autism. Ryan lives at home with his parents, Kathy and Bob, and has two older brothers as well as two pet dogs that he spends a great deal of time with. Ryan also works at a local supermarket chain called Krogers where he collects shopping trolleys and cleans the aisles. Ryan has benefitted from Afinitor, a drug made by Novartis which causes a significant reduction in tumors. This benefit for Ryan is actually a side bar discovery and not the original intent of the drug. It is an example of how research and development in the pharm world can lead to unexpected and beneficial discoveries. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage for Novartis.)

BRIGHTON, MICHIGAN, USA, 25 MAY 2014: Ryan Groves is 27 years old and lives in Brighton, Michigan, where he participates in the Special Olympics while living with Tuberous Sclerosis. He is a track and field athlete and has won many medals at the Special Olympics. Some of Ryan’s resulting disorders associated with TSC include renal angiomyolipomas and mild autism. Ryan lives at home with his parents, Kathy and Bob, and has two older brothers as well as two pet dogs that he spends a great deal of time with. Ryan also works at a local supermarket chain called Krogers where he collects shopping trolleys and cleans the aisles. Ryan has benefitted from Afinitor, a drug made by Novartis which causes a significant reduction in tumors. This benefit for Ryan is actually a side bar discovery and not the original intent of the drug. It is an example of how research and development in the pharm world can lead to unexpected and beneficial discoveries. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage for Novartis.)

LEBANON, TENNESSEE, USA, 30 MAY 2014: Whitney Lackey is a 17-year-old athlete living in Lebanon, Tennessee who participates in the Special Olympics while managing Tuberous Sclerosis. Whitney experiences renal angiomyolipomas, angiofibromas and cognitive delays associated with her TSC diagnosis. Whitney is an only child and lives at home with her parents, Sharon and Brent Lackey. Whitney has had multiple tumors all over her body since she was a baby and also suffers from seizures. Novartis makes a drug called Afinitor which was developed as a cancer medication. It has the unexpected effect of shrinking tumors in people with Tuberous Sclerosis. This underlines the importance of ongoing research and development for big Pharma, something Novartis does more of than any other pharmaceutical company. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage for Novartis.)

LEBANON, TENNESSEE, USA, 30 MAY 2014: Whitney Lackey is a 17-year-old athlete living in Lebanon, Tennessee who participates in the Special Olympics while managing Tuberous Sclerosis. Whitney experiences renal angiomyolipomas, angiofibromas and cognitive delays associated with her TSC diagnosis. Whitney is an only child and lives at home with her parents, Sharon and Brent Lackey. Whitney has had multiple tumors all over her body since she was a baby and also suffers from seizures. Novartis makes a drug called Afinitor which was developed as a cancer medication. It has the unexpected effect of shrinking tumors in people with Tuberous Sclerosis. This underlines the importance of ongoing research and development for big Pharma, something Novartis does more of than any other pharmaceutical company. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage for Novartis.)

LEBANON, TENNESSEE, USA, 30 MAY 2014: Whitney Lackey is a 17-year-old athlete living in Lebanon, Tennessee who participates in the Special Olympics while managing Tuberous Sclerosis. Whitney experiences renal angiomyolipomas, angiofibromas and cognitive delays associated with her TSC diagnosis. Whitney is an only child and lives at home with her parents, Sharon and Brent Lackey. Whitney has had multiple tumors all over her body since she was a baby and also suffers from seizures. Novartis makes a drug called Afinitor which was developed as a cancer medication. It has the unexpected effect of shrinking tumors in people with Tuberous Sclerosis. This underlines the importance of ongoing research and development for big Pharma, something Novartis does more of than any other pharmaceutical company. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage for Novartis.)

MU CANG CHAI, YEN BAI, VIETNAM, 6 JUNE 2015: Dr Chang As Sinh, 37, waits for patients at the community hospital in the hills over Mu Cang Chai. Sinh has worked in this community for over 10 years and is the only doctor in the community. He speaks the local Hmong dialect and is instrumental in medical care delivery to this remote ethnic minority. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis)

MU CANG CHAI, YEN BAI, VIETNAM, 5 JUNE 2015: Giang Giua Cua, 77, suffers from Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Obstruction, COPD, a common affliction amongst this community. Fires are burnt inside the home for both warmth and cooking, thereby causing potential respitory issues. Cua is visited at home by community doctor Chang As Sinh, 37. Sinh has worked in this community for over 10 years and is the only doctor in the community. (Photo by Brent Stirton/ Novartis)

MU CANG CHAI, YEN BAI, VIETNAM, 6 JUNE 2015: A volunteer doctor for the Novartis Cung Song Khoe program for Vietnam visits a very sick man who is suffering from kidney failure. The doctor monitors his condition and tries to help manage his deteriorating health. Poverty is very debilitating in these circumstances, with dialysis necessary, transport to the nearest canditate city, rent and food while there, the treatment itself, are all beyond this man's family and it is likely he will die. Doctors in the community are vital as cases like this can be seen earlier and help secured before it is too late. The Cung Song Khoe program is all about medical education, from what is happening with the body to how to deal with problems and what the correct medical procedure is to follow. (Photo by Brent Stirton/ Novartis.)

MU CANG CHAI, YEN BAI, VIETNAM, 5 JUNE 2015: Dr Chang As Sinh, 37, seen making his way to a house call in Mu Cang Chai. Sinh has worked in this community for over 10 years and is the only doctor in the community. He speaks the local Hmong dialect and is instrumental in medical care delivery to this remote ethnic minority. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis)

MU CANG CHAI, YEN BAI, VIETNAM, 5 JUNE 2015: Dr Chang As Sinh, 37, has worked in this community for over 10 years and is the only doctor in the community. He speaks the local Hmong dialect and is instrumental in medical care delivery to this remote ethnic minority. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis)

MU CANG CHAI, YEN BAI, VIETNAM, 6 JUNE 2015: Dr Chang As Sinh, 37, updates his records in his office in the community hospital in the hills over Mu Cang Chai. Sinh has worked in this community for over 10 years and is the only doctor in the community. He speaks the local Hmong dialect and is instrumental in medical care delivery to this remote ethnic minority. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis)

MU CANG CHAI, YEN BAI, VIETNAM, 6 JUNE 2015: Local Hmong women pose for pictures after coming up from working in the rice paddies below. The beautiful shapes of the rice paddies is something that Mu Cang Chai is famous for. Rice is the staple crop in a community where people earn on average less than one dollar a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis)

MU CANG CHAI, YEN BAI, VIETNAM, 5 JUNE 2015: local people prepare the rice paddies Mu Cang Chai is famous for. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis)

MU CANG CHAI, VIETNAM, 7 JUNE 2015: The Director of Mu Cang Chai Preventative Health Centre, Dr Cu Ahong, does his rounds to visit with his many patients. His district is 90% ethnic Hmong people and his small hospital deals with many ailments that his communal clinics and healthworkers refer. He is seen here with a young couple with their first child, a caesarian birth he delivered. (photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis.)

MU CANG CHAI, VIETNAM, 7 JUNE 2015: The Director of Mu Cang Chai Preventative Health Centre, Dr Cu Ahong, does his rounds to visit with his many patients. His district is 90% ethnic Hmong people and his small hospital deals with many ailments that his communal clinics and healthworkers refer. He is seen here with a premature baby he delivered and the mother. (photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis.)

MU CANG CHAI, VIETNAM, 7 JUNE 2015: The Director of Mu Cang Chai Preventative Health Centre, Dr Cu Ahong, does his rounds to visit with his many patients. His district is 90% ethnic Hmong people and his small hospital deals with many ailments that his communal clinics and healthworkers refer. He is seen here with a young Hmong girl who has severe abdominal pain. Mu Thi Cha is her name and she is 8 years old. (photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis.)

MU CANG CHAI, VIETNAM, 7 JUNE 2015: The Director of Mu Cang Chai Preventative Health Centre, Dr Cu Ahong, does his rounds to visit with his many patients. His district is 90% ethnic Hmong people and his small hospital deals with many ailments that his communal clinics and health-workers refer. He is seen in his emergency room with a Hmong woman Lu Thi Bau who has a bacterial infection which has resulted in septicemia. He is monitoring her with antibiotics for now, (photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis.)

HANOI, VIETNAM, 9 JUNE 2015: Tradional healthcare stores in the old quarter of Hanoi, Vietnam. Medical treatments are changing in Vietnam but with an ancient tradtional medicine system in place that will take time. The pharmaceutical industry in Vietnam is growing at a rapid 17% per annum but much of that is with unregulated medicines which are expensive for a population where many still struggle with poverty. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis)

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SEPTEMBER 2015: Dr Amy Rothberg seen at home in Ann Arbor, Michigan. Dr Rothberg is one of the foremost medical authorities on the science of obesity medicine in America. She runs the weight management program for the University of Michigan Health system. Amy E. Rothberg, MD, PhD, is Assistant Professor of Internal Medicine in the Division of Metabolism, Endocrinology and Diabetes and Director of the Weight Management Clinic. She specializes in the treatment of overweight and obesity, diabetes, and related metabolic diseases. Dr. Rothberg is one of the first in the nation to receive certification in obesity medicine from the American Board of Obesity Medicine.This is an advanced weight loss program that accepts referrals from within the University of Michigan’s Health system and from community physicians. It embraces the notion of long term weight management for obese individuals. The weight management program provides intense educational, dietary, physical, behavioral and pharmacological interventions. The University of Michigan weight management program offers a 2 year intervention. There are 11 visits to a physician and 26 visits with a registered dietician during these 2 years. The first 3 to 6 months involve an intense dietary induction phase. At their first appointment all patients are asked to sign a contract agreeing to attend greater than 80% of their scheduled appointments with the physician and dietician during the initial 2 year period. At the first visit a comprehensive health and weight history is compiled. Anti-diabetic therapy is adjusted at this first visit to optimize glycemic control and to promote weight loss. Weight loss is then initiated by employing a very low calorie diet (800 kcal/day) The rationale is that meal replacement limits food choices and divorces patients from unhealthy consumptive behavior. Patients keep daily diaries of these behaviors. These are then reviewed with the dietician on a weekly basis. Patients

MICHIGAN, SEPTEMBER 2015: Jacob Jensen, 25, is an engineer who lives near Farmingtion, Michigan. He is a successful member of the University of Michigan's weight management program. Jacob has lost 57 pounds in the 9 months he has been in the program so far. He is seen speaking in consultation with Dr Amy Rothberg as well as Christine Fowler, his dietician in the program. Jacob now runs regularly and has recently done a triathlon. His number is 7169821626. This is an advanced weight loss program that accepts referrals from within the University of Michigan’s Health system and from community physicians. It embraces the notion of long term weight management for obese individuals. The weight management program provides intense educational, dietary, physical, behavioral and pharmacological interventions. The University of Michigan weight management program offers a 2 year intervention. There are 11 visits to a physician and 26 visits with a registered dietician during these 2 years. The first 3 to 6 months involve an intense dietary induction phase. At their first appointment all patients are asked to sign a contract agreeing to attend greater than 80% of their scheduled appointments with the physician and dietician during the initial 2 year period. At the first visit a comprehensive health and weight history is compiled. Anti-diabetic therapy is adjusted at this first visit to optimize glycemic control and to promote weight loss. Weight loss is then initiated by employing a very low calorie diet (800 kcal/day) The rationale is that meal replacement limits food choices and divorces patients from unhealthy consumptive behavior. Patients keep daily diaries of these behaviors. These are then reviewed with the dietician on a weekly basis. Patients are then asked to increase their physical activity to 40 minutes per day. 3 to 6 months after this a weight loss of 15% is the average achievement. Regular foods are then reintroduced and the intervention begins to focus on behav

MICHIGAN, SEPTEMBER 2015: Jacob Jensen, 25, is an engineer who lives near Farmingtion, Michigan. He is a successful member of the University of Michigan's weight management program. Jacob has lost 57 pounds in the 9 months he has been in the program so far. He is seen speaking in consultation with Dr Amy Rothberg as well as Christine Fowler, his dietician in the program. Jacob now runs regularly and has recently done a triathlon. His number is 7169821626. This is an advanced weight loss program that accepts referrals from within the University of Michigan’s Health system and from community physicians. It embraces the notion of long term weight management for obese individuals. The weight management program provides intense educational, dietary, physical, behavioral and pharmacological interventions. The University of Michigan weight management program offers a 2 year intervention. There are 11 visits to a physician and 26 visits with a registered dietician during these 2 years. The first 3 to 6 months involve an intense dietary induction phase. At their first appointment all patients are asked to sign a contract agreeing to attend greater than 80% of their scheduled appointments with the physician and dietician during the initial 2 year period. At the first visit a comprehensive health and weight history is compiled. Anti-diabetic therapy is adjusted at this first visit to optimize glycemic control and to promote weight loss. Weight loss is then initiated by employing a very low calorie diet (800 kcal/day) The rationale is that meal replacement limits food choices and divorces patients from unhealthy consumptive behavior. Patients keep daily diaries of these behaviors. These are then reviewed with the dietician on a weekly basis. Patients are then asked to increase their physical activity to 40 minutes per day. 3 to 6 months after this a weight loss of 15% is the average achievement. Regular foods are then reintroduced and the intervention begins to focus on behav

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SEPTEMBER 2015: David Thomas has been a part of the University of Michigan’s Weight management program for 4 years. This is the second round for David as he did not achieve the goals he needed the first time. He is seen at the University of Michigan Exercise therapy lab with Exercise physiologists Heidi Reger and Ann Brennan. This is where he is monitored for body mass index, lung capacity and a specific exercise program is developed for his needs. David is diabetic and uses Insulin daily, other people on this program have been able to give up Insulin due to weight management successes. David would hope to do the same. He sticks to a prescribed diet and exercises regularly, utilizing gym in his home in Ann Arbor. David works in the motor industry in Detroit and has done so for many years. His contact numbers are as follows: 1 2488729001, 12483350309, 12482445786. His email is dthomas@comcast.netThis is an advanced weight loss program that accepts referrals from within the University of Michigan’s Health system and from community physicians. It embraces the notion of long term weight management for obese individuals. The weight management program provides intense educational, dietary, physical, behavioral and pharmacological interventions. The University of Michigan weight management program offers a 2 year intervention. There are 11 visits to a physician and 26 visits with a registered dietician during these 2 years. The first 3 to 6 months involve an intense dietary induction phase. At their first appointment all patients are asked to sign a contract agreeing to attend greater than 80% of their scheduled appointments with the physician and dietician during the initial 2 year period. At the first visit a comprehensive health and weight history is compiled. Anti-diabetic therapy is adjusted at this first visit to optimize glycemic control and to promote weight loss. Weight loss is then initiated by employing a very low calorie diet (800 kcal

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SEPTEMBER 2015: David Thomas has been a part of the University of Michigan’s Weight management program for 4 years. This is the second round for David as he did not achieve the goals he needed the first time. He is seen at the University of Michigan Exercise therapy lab with Exercise physiologists Heidi Reger and Ann Brennan. This is where he is monitored for body mass index, lung capacity and a specific exercise program is developed for his needs. David is diabetic and uses Insulin daily, other people on this program have been able to give up Insulin due to weight management successes. David would hope to do the same. He sticks to a prescribed diet and exercises regularly, utilizing gym in his home in Ann Arbor. David works in the motor industry in Detroit and has done so for many years. His contact numbers are as follows: 1 2488729001, 12483350309, 12482445786. His email is dthomas@comcast.netThis is an advanced weight loss program that accepts referrals from within the University of Michigan’s Health system and from community physicians. It embraces the notion of long term weight management for obese individuals. The weight management program provides intense educational, dietary, physical, behavioral and pharmacological interventions. The University of Michigan weight management program offers a 2 year intervention. There are 11 visits to a physician and 26 visits with a registered dietician during these 2 years. The first 3 to 6 months involve an intense dietary induction phase. At their first appointment all patients are asked to sign a contract agreeing to attend greater than 80% of their scheduled appointments with the physician and dietician during the initial 2 year period. At the first visit a comprehensive health and weight history is compiled. Anti-diabetic therapy is adjusted at this first visit to optimize glycemic control and to promote weight loss. Weight loss is then initiated by employing a very low calorie diet (800 kcal

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SEPTEMBER 2015: David Thomas has been a part of the University of Michigan’s Weight management program for 4 years. This is the second round for David as he did not achieve the goals he needed the first time. He is seen at the University of Michigan Exercise therapy lab where he is monitored by exercise physiologist Heidi Reger for body mass index, lung capacity and a specific exercise program is developed for his needs. David is diabetic and uses Insulin daily, other people on this program have been able to give up Insulin due to weight management successes. David would hope to do the same. He sticks to a prescribed diet and exercises regularly, utilizing gym in his home in Ann Arbor. David works in the motor industry in Detroit and has done so for many years. His contact numbers are as follows: 1 2488729001, 12483350309, 12482445786. His email is dthomas@comcast.netThis is an advanced weight loss program that accepts referrals from within the University of Michigan’s Health system and from community physicians. It embraces the notion of long term weight management for obese individuals. The weight management program provides intense educational, dietary, physical, behavioral and pharmacological interventions. The University of Michigan weight management program offers a 2 year intervention. There are 11 visits to a physician and 26 visits with a registered dietician during these 2 years. The first 3 to 6 months involve an intense dietary induction phase. At their first appointment all patients are asked to sign a contract agreeing to attend greater than 80% of their scheduled appointments with the physician and dietician during the initial 2 year period. At the first visit a comprehensive health and weight history is compiled. Anti-diabetic therapy is adjusted at this first visit to optimize glycemic control and to promote weight loss. Weight loss is then initiated by employing a very low calorie diet (800 kcal/day) The rationale is that

 KISUMU, KENYA, 21 JUNE 2015: Shelvine Achreng is sick with Leukemia and Sickle Cell disease. Her parents are impoverished farm labourers who cannot afford transport to the appropriate hospital, let alone the costs of treating Shelvine's condition. Victims of this kind of disease amongst Africa's poor are destined to die without outside intervention. Non-Communicable diseases like Cancer, Hypertension and Diabetes are on the rise in Africa, adding to the strain the more traditional diseases already place on populations. Poverty only serves to increase fatalities amongst the poorest of these. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis)
 DHAKA CITY, BANGLADESH, AUGUST 2015: A child suffering from acute Childhood Pneumonia is given respitary tests, temperature readings and wieighed at the local Kamalapur clinic. From there the child has blood taken for a test and then is sent to the main hospital once diagnosed with acute Pneumonia. ICDDR,B is an independent, non-profit health research institute dedicated to improving the lives of people living in poverty in Bangladesh and globally. They specialize in child and adolescent health with a focus on diarrheal diseases, cholera as well as childhood pneumonia. Their urban site at Kamalapur was founded to monitor pneumonia in children through fieldworkers who are in the field every day. There are 60 field staff, 18 medical teams, and 3 researchers. These field teams are made up entirely of women as they are dealing with mothers most of the time. These field teams conduct daily surveys that relate to fever, labored breathing, lethargy, and inability to drink water, convulsions and headaches. Each fieldworker will see at least 23 patients every day, 6 days a week. If necessary, the child is then brought to the Kamalapur clinic where they are given blood tests, nebulized and given Amoxicillin if the need exists. In severe cases they are taken to the main ICDDR hospital in Dhaka. In most cases, local rickshaws will be used for transport; this is the most common means of transport in Dhaka. When a fieldworker visits a home, she will check the temperature of the child as well as the respiratory rate. She will then ask the mother a number of questions on the child’s health. This all goes to form a large database that has come to represent the country as a whole. Pneumonia remains one of the biggest killers of children under 5 around the world today.  (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis.)
 DHAKA CITY, BANGLADESH, AUGUST 2015: An ICDDR,B healthcare workers deals with a mother who's child is suffering from severe childhood Pneumonia. A decision is made to get the child to the Kamalapur clinic for testing asap, then the child is taken to the main ICDDR,B hospital in Dhaka city. THe main mode of transport for this is the rickshaw. ICDDR,B is an independent, non-profit health research institute dedicated to improving the lives of people living in poverty in Bangladesh and globally. They specialize in child and adolescent health with a focus on diarrheal diseases, cholera as well as childhood pneumonia. Their urban site at Kamalapur was founded to monitor pneumonia in children through fieldworkers who are in the field every day. There are 60 field staff, 18 medical teams, and 3 researchers. These field teams are made up entirely of women as they are dealing with mothers most of the time. These field teams conduct daily surveys that relate to fever, labored breathing, lethargy, and inability to drink water, convulsions and headaches. Each fieldworker will see at least 23 patients every day, 6 days a week. If necessary, the child is then brought to the Kamalapur clinic where they are given blood tests, nebulized and given Amoxicillin if the need exists. In severe cases they are taken to the main ICDDR hospital in Dhaka. In most cases, local rickshaws will be used for transport; this is the most common means of transport in Dhaka. When a fieldworker visits a home, she will check the temperature of the child as well as the respiratory rate. She will then ask the mother a number of questions on the child’s health. This all goes to form a large database that has come to represent the country as a whole. Pneumonia remains one of the biggest killers of children under 5 around the world today.  (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis.)
 DHAKA CITY, BANGLADESH, AUGUST 2015: Local men bathe riverside after a long day transporting goods at the local vegetable market. ICDDR,B is an independent, non-profit health research institute dedicated to improving the lives of people living in poverty in Bangladesh and globally. They specialize in child and adolescent health with a focus on diarrheal diseases, cholera as well as childhood pneumonia. Their urban site at Kamalapur was founded to monitor pneumonia in children through fieldworkers who are in the field every day. There are 60 field staff, 18 medical teams, and 3 researchers. These field teams are made up entirely of women as they are dealing with mothers most of the time. These field teams conduct daily surveys that relate to fever, labored breathing, lethargy, and inability to drink water, convulsions and headaches. Each fieldworker will see at least 23 patients every day, 6 days a week. If necessary, the child is then brought to the Kamalapur clinic where they are given blood tests, nebulized and given Amoxicillin if the need exists. In severe cases they are taken to the main ICDDR hospital in Dhaka. In most cases, local rickshaws will be used for transport; this is the most common means of transport in Dhaka. When a fieldworker visits a home, she will check the temperature of the child as well as the respiratory rate. She will then ask the mother a number of questions on the child’s health. This all goes to form a large database that has come to represent the country as a whole. Pneumonia remains one of the biggest killers of children under 5 around the world today.  (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis.)
 DHAKA CITY, BANGLADESH, AUGUST 2015: Healthcare workers survey mothers about their children in the Kamalapur district. ICDDR,B is an independent, non-profit health research institute dedicated to improving the lives of people living in poverty in Bangladesh and globally. They specialize in child and adolescent health with a focus on diarrheal diseases, cholera as well as childhood pneumonia. Their urban site at Kamalapur was founded to monitor pneumonia in children through fieldworkers who are in the field every day. There are 60 field staff, 18 medical teams, and 3 researchers. These field teams are made up entirely of women as they are dealing with mothers most of the time. These field teams conduct daily surveys that relate to fever, labored breathing, lethargy, and inability to drink water, convulsions and headaches. Each fieldworker will see at least 23 patients every day, 6 days a week. If necessary, the child is then brought to the Kamalapur clinic where they are given blood tests, nebulized and given Amoxicillin if the need exists. In severe cases they are taken to the main ICDDR hospital in Dhaka. In most cases, local rickshaws will be used for transport; this is the most common means of transport in Dhaka. When a fieldworker visits a home, she will check the temperature of the child as well as the respiratory rate. She will then ask the mother a number of questions on the child’s health. This all goes to form a large database that has come to represent the country as a whole. Pneumonia remains one of the biggest killers of children under 5 around the world today.  (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis.)
 DHAKA CITY, BANGLADESH, AUGUST 2015:Two mothers who's children are both suffering from Pneumonia wait to receive treatment for their children at the Kamalapur ICDDR,B clinic. ICDDR,B is an independent, non-profit health research institute dedicated to improving the lives of people living in poverty in Bangladesh and globally. They specialize in child and adolescent health with a focus on diarrheal diseases, cholera as well as childhood pneumonia. Their urban site at Kamalapur was founded to monitor pneumonia in children through fieldworkers who are in the field every day. There are 60 field staff, 18 medical teams, and 3 researchers. These field teams are made up entirely of women as they are dealing with mothers most of the time. These field teams conduct daily surveys that relate to fever, labored breathing, lethargy, and inability to drink water, convulsions and headaches. Each fieldworker will see at least 23 patients every day, 6 days a week. If necessary, the child is then brought to the Kamalapur clinic where they are given blood tests, nebulized and given Amoxicillin if the need exists. In severe cases they are taken to the main ICDDR hospital in Dhaka. In most cases, local rickshaws will be used for transport; this is the most common means of transport in Dhaka. When a fieldworker visits a home, she will check the temperature of the child as well as the respiratory rate. She will then ask the mother a number of questions on the child’s health. This all goes to form a large database that has come to represent the country as a whole. Pneumonia remains one of the biggest killers of children under 5 around the world today.  (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis.)
 DHAKA CITY, BANGLADESH, AUGUST 2015: A ICDDR,B healthcare workers deals with a mother who's child is suffering from severe childhood Pneumonia. ICDDR,B is an independent, non-profit health research institute dedicated to improving the lives of people living in poverty in Bangladesh and globally. They specialize in child and adolescent health with a focus on diarrheal diseases, cholera as well as childhood pneumonia. Their urban site at Kamalapur was founded to monitor pneumonia in children through fieldworkers who are in the field every day. There are 60 field staff, 18 medical teams, and 3 researchers. These field teams are made up entirely of women as they are dealing with mothers most of the time. These field teams conduct daily surveys that relate to fever, labored breathing, lethargy, and inability to drink water, convulsions and headaches. Each fieldworker will see at least 23 patients every day, 6 days a week. If necessary, the child is then brought to the Kamalapur clinic where they are given blood tests, nebulized and given Amoxicillin if the need exists. In severe cases they are taken to the main ICDDR hospital in Dhaka. In most cases, local rickshaws will be used for transport; this is the most common means of transport in Dhaka. When a fieldworker visits a home, she will check the temperature of the child as well as the respiratory rate. She will then ask the mother a number of questions on the child’s health. This all goes to form a large database that has come to represent the country as a whole. Pneumonia remains one of the biggest killers of children under 5 around the world today.  (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis.)
 SAO PAOLO, BRAZIL, 26 AUGUST 2014: Maria Lucia Martins Moreira, 68, has her stage 3 cataracts operated on at the prestigious Rue Domingos Arevelo Opthamology center in Sao Paolo, Brazil. Maria Lucia was operated on by Laser utilizing Alcon equipment and medication by renowned eye surgeon Dr Walton Nose'. She was included in this program because Dr Nose' is also a professor and as part of his university's outreach program to the economically challenged she was able to have her cataracts removed. The surgery took no longer than fifteen minutes per eye and Maria Lucia went home to a poorer suburb of Sao Paolo, Brazil where she was able to play with her grandchildren immediately. Maria Lucia is a devout woman who is a former School Canteen worker. She could no longer read her bible before the operation, she could not sew and she could not interact properly with her grandchildren or catch the bus without help seeing directions and place names. Maria Lucia is from a lower income family yet due to the efforts of Alcon, she has now undergone cataract surgery and is expected to make a good recovery of her sight. She is looking forward to seeing her grandchildren again more than anything. She is looking forward to rejoining her bible study class and no longer falling down the stairs. She has been very worried about her children having to take care of her. This cataract surgery will in effect free not just Maria Lucia but her whole family from the problem of cataract blindness. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage by Getty Images for Novartis.)
 SAO PAOLO, BRAZIL, 26 AUGUST 2014: Maria Lucia Martins Moreira, 68, has her stage 3 cataracts operated on at the prestigious Rue Domingos Arevelo Opthamology center in Sao Paolo, Brazil. Maria Lucia was operated on by Laser utilizing Alcon equipment and medication by renowned eye surgeon Dr Walton Nose'. She was included in this program because Dr Nose' is also a professor and as part of his university's outreach program to the economically challenged she was able to have her cataracts removed. The surgery took no longer than fifteen minutes per eye and Maria Lucia went home to a poorer suburb of Sao Paolo, Brazil where she was able to play with her grandchildren immediately. Maria Lucia is a devout woman who is a former School Canteen worker. She could no longer read her bible before the operation, she could not sew and she could not interact properly with her grandchildren or catch the bus without help seeing directions and place names. Maria Lucia is from a lower income family yet due to the efforts of Alcon, she has now undergone cataract surgery and is expected to make a good recovery of her sight. She is looking forward to seeing her grandchildren again more than anything. She is looking forward to rejoining her bible study class and no longer falling down the stairs. She has been very worried about her children having to take care of her. This cataract surgery will in effect free not just Maria Lucia but her whole family from the problem of cataract blindness. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage by Getty Images for Novartis.)
 SAO PAOLO, BRAZIL, 26 AUGUST 2014: Maria Lucia Martins Moreira, 68, in a rare quiet moment at home shortly after she had her stage 3 cataracts removed at the Rue Domingos Arevelo Opthamology center in Sao Paolo, Brazil. Maria Lucia was operated on by Laser utilizing Alcon equipment and medication. The surgery took no longer than fifteen minutes and Maria Lucia went home to a poorer suburb of Brzzil where she was able to play with her grandchildren immediately. Maria Lucia is a devout woman who is a former School Canteen worker. She could no longer read her bible before the operation, she could not sew and she could not interact properly with her grandchildren or catch the bus without help seeing directions and place names. Maria Lucia is from a lower income family yet due to the efforts of Alcon, she has now undergone cataract surgery and is expected to make a good recovery of her sight. She is looking forward to seeing her grandchildren again more than anything. She is looking forward to rejoining her bible study class and no longer falling down the stairs. She has been very worried about her children having to take care of her. This cataract surgery will in effect free not just Maria Lucia but her whole family from the problem of cataract blindness. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage by Getty Images for Novartis.)
 SAO PAOLO, BRAZIL, 26 AUGUST 2014: Maria Lucia Martins Moreira, 68, feels out her new eyes by catching up on her sewing shortly after she had her stage 3 cataracts removed at the Rue Domingos Arevelo Opthamology center in Sao Paolo, Brazil. Maria Lucia was operated on by Laser utilizing Alcon equipment and medication. The surgery took no longer than fifteen minutes and Maria Lucia went home to a poorer suburb of Sao Paolo where she was able to play with her grandchildren immediately. Maria Lucia is a devout woman who is a former School Canteen worker. She could no longer read her bible before the operation, she could not sew and she could not interact properly with her grandchildren or catch the bus without help seeing directions and place names. Maria Lucia is from a lower income family yet due to the efforts of Alcon, she has now undergone cataract surgery and is expected to make a good recovery of her sight. She is looking forward to seeing her grandchildren again more than anything. She is looking forward to rejoining her bible study class and no longer falling down the stairs. She has been very worried about her children having to take care of her. This cataract surgery will in effect free not just Maria Lucia but her whole family from the problem of cataract blindness. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage by Getty Images for Novartis.)
 CARCABUEY, ANDALUCIA, SPAIN, 11 JULY 2014: Fernando Sanchez, 84, is a longtime resident of the Andalucía village of Carcabuey in Spain along with his wife Emilia, 82. Fernando is a man who has been living with type 2 diabetes for over 30 years. As Fernando gets older, he is more careful with his diet and tries to exercise on a regular basis as well as cut back on his sugar intake. Recently Fernando was chosen to star in a short film on diabetes as part of a Novartis sponsored short film awareness campaign for Spain. Fernando is seen rejecting sugar and instead turning to dance with his onscreen partner Filomena Zamit, 86, herself a diabetes patient. They are the “sugar” in each other’s onscreen lives. Fernando has achieved some fame in the village as a result of the film and now dances as often as he is able. During this shoot he is seen in his home with his devout wife Emilia, 82, he is seen socializing and playing dominos with his friends and he is seen dancing with his dance partner Filomena on the streets of Carcabuey. He also meets up with a group of young ladies learning the Flamenco. Fernando cannot resist taking part and even takes Filomena along to a Flamenco rehearsal. Fernando has embraced a healthier lifestyle combined with the correction medication to combat his diabetes and live a longer, healthier lifestyle. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage for Novartis.)
 CARCABUEY, ANDALUCIA, SPAIN, 11 JULY 2014: Fernando Sanchez, 84, is a longtime resident of the Andalucía village of Carcabuey in Spain along with his wife Emilia, 82. Fernando is a man who has been living with type 2 diabetes for over 30 years. As Fernando gets older, he is more careful with his diet and tries to exercise on a regular basis as well as cut back on his sugar intake. Recently Fernando was chosen to star in a short film on diabetes as part of a Novartis sponsored short film awareness campaign for Spain. Fernando is seen rejecting sugar and instead turning to dance with his onscreen partner Filomena Zamit, 86, herself a diabetes patient. They are the “sugar” in each other’s onscreen lives. Fernando has achieved some fame in the village as a result of the film and now dances as often as he is able. During this shoot he is seen in his home with his devout wife Emilia, 82, he is seen socializing and playing dominos with his friends and he is seen dancing with his dance partner Filomena on the streets of Carcabuey. He also meets up with a group of young ladies learning the Flamenco. Fernando cannot resist taking part and even takes Filomena along to a Flamenco rehearsal. Fernando has embraced a healthier lifestyle combined with the correction medication to combat his diabetes and live a longer, healthier lifestyle. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage for Novartis.)
 CARCABUEY, ANDALUCIA, SPAIN, 11 JULY 2014: Fernando Sanchez, 84, is a longtime resident of the Andalucía village of Carcabuey in Spain along with his wife Emilia, 82. Fernando is a man who has been living with type 2 diabetes for over 30 years. As Fernando gets older, he is more careful with his diet and tries to exercise on a regular basis as well as cut back on his sugar intake. Recently Fernando was chosen to star in a short film on diabetes as part of a Novartis sponsored short film awareness campaign for Spain. Fernando is seen rejecting sugar and instead turning to dance with his onscreen partner Filomena Zamit, 86, herself a diabetes patient. They are the “sugar” in each other’s onscreen lives. Fernando has achieved some fame in the village as a result of the film and now dances as often as he is able. During this shoot he is seen in his home with his devout wife Emilia, 82, he is seen socializing and playing dominos with his friends and he is seen dancing with his dance partner Filomena on the streets of Carcabuey. He also meets up with a group of young ladies learning the Flamenco. Fernando cannot resist taking part and even takes Filomena along to a Flamenco rehearsal. Fernando has embraced a healthier lifestyle combined with the correction medication to combat his diabetes and live a longer, healthier lifestyle. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage for Novartis.)
 PATNA, INDIA, 10 SEPTEMBER 2014: Elderly women with cataract blindness arrive by boat at a blindness camp along the river near Patna, India. India is estimated to have over 10 million blind people, most of whom suffer from cureable cataracts. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis)
 PATNA, INDIA, 10 SEPTEMBER 2014: A group of women with eye problems crowd in to see an opthamolagist at a blindness camp along the river near Patna, India. India is estimated to have over 10 million blind people, most of whom suffer from cureable cataracts. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis)
 SILIGURI, DARJEELING DISTRICT, INDIA, JULY 22 2015: Dr Janak Shah is an accomplished and prolific eye surgeon who volunteers his services to the global poor via SEE International, an NGO with a focus on curing blindness. He is seen examining and performing eye surgery at the Baba Loknath Eye Mission hospital. This is a long established religious mission that offers facilities to SEE where Janak can run a blindness camp as well as perform the surgeries required. Janak graduated from the University of Bombay in 1991, and completed his residency in ophthalmology in 1996. He’s been volunteering with SEE International as an eye surgeon since 1996, and in 2013, passed the milestone of 100 SEE expeditions. He is SEE’s most prolific doctor and has worked in places like the Peruvian Jungle, Gaza Strip, Lebanon, Mongolia, China, Brazil and many other remote locations. He has worked all over India and has performed thousands of eye surgeries, addressing every kind of illness. Janak is a proud adherent of the Jainism religion; he is a strong believer in their religious tenants of mankind being one. Janak often works with his wife Preeti, herself a talented eye surgeon. Together they are a formidable force and can work quickly on a multitude of surgeries in a single day. They have two daughters, one of 11 and the other 15. Both girls often travel with their parents on their volunteer trips for SEE and actively assistant in patient diagnosis as well as assisting their parents in surgery. Janak and Preeti both believe this gives the girls a real perspective on their place in the world and helps to bind them as a family unit. The Shahs live in Mumbai, India and run a successful eye surgery practice when they are not volunteering for SEE International. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis)
 SHRI BHOJAY SARVODAYA EYE HOSPITAL, BHUJ, KUTCH, INDIA, JULY 22 2015: Eye surgeons Janak and Preeti Shah working via headlamp on a surgical operation during a powercut in this remote region of India. Dr Janak Shah is an accomplished and prolific eye surgeon who volunteers his services to the global poor via SEE International, an NGO with a focus on curing blindness. He and his wife Preeti are seen examining and performing eye surgery at the Shri Bhojay Sarvodaya Eye hospital close to the India Pakistan border. This is a new hospital that offers modern facilities to SEE where Janak can run a blindness camp as well as perform the surgeries required. Janak graduated from the University of Bombay in 1991, and completed his residency in ophthalmology in 1996. He’s been volunteering with SEE International as an eye surgeon since 1996, and in 2013, passed the milestone of 100 SEE expeditions. He is SEE’s most prolific doctor and has worked in places like the Peruvian Jungle, Gaza Strip, Lebanon, Mongolia, China, Brazil and many other remote locations. He has worked all over India and has performed thousands of eye surgeries, addressing every kind of illness. Janak is a proud adherent of the Jainism religion; he is a strong believer in their religious tenants of mankind being one. Janak often works with his wife Preeti, herself a talented eye surgeon. Together they are a formidable force and can work quickly on a multitude of surgeries in a single day. They have two daughters, one of 11 and the other 15. Both girls often travel with their parents on their volunteer trips for SEE and actively assistant in patient diagnosis as well as assisting their parents in surgery. Janak and Preeti both believe this gives the girls a real perspective on their place in the world and helps to bind them as a family unit. The Shahs live in Mumbai, India and run a successful eye surgery practice when they are not volunteering for SEE International. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis)
 SILIGURI, DARJEELING DISTRICT, INDIA, JULY 22 2015: Dr Janak Shah is an accomplished and prolific eye surgeon who volunteers his services to the global poor via SEE International, an NGO with a focus on curing blindness. He is seen examining and performing eye surgery at the Baba Loknath Eye Mission hospital. This is a long established religious mission that offers facilities to SEE where Janak can run a blindness camp as well as perform the surgeries required. Janak graduated from the University of Bombay in 1991, and completed his residency in ophthalmology in 1996. He’s been volunteering with SEE International as an eye surgeon since 1996, and in 2013, passed the milestone of 100 SEE expeditions. He is SEE’s most prolific doctor and has worked in places like the Peruvian Jungle, Gaza Strip, Lebanon, Mongolia, China, Brazil and many other remote locations. He has worked all over India and has performed thousands of eye surgeries, addressing every kind of illness. Janak is a proud adherent of the Jainism religion; he is a strong believer in their religious tenants of mankind being one. Janak often works with his wife Preeti, herself a talented eye surgeon. Together they are a formidable force and can work quickly on a multitude of surgeries in a single day. They have two daughters, one of 11 and the other 15. Both girls often travel with their parents on their volunteer trips for SEE and actively assistant in patient diagnosis as well as assisting their parents in surgery. Janak and Preeti both believe this gives the girls a real perspective on their place in the world and helps to bind them as a family unit. The Shahs live in Mumbai, India and run a successful eye surgery practice when they are not volunteering for SEE International. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis)
 SHRI BHOJAY SARVODAYA EYE HOSPITAL, BHUJ, KUTCH, INDIA, JULY 22 2015: Dr Janak Shah examines patients after a series of successful eye surgreries. He is an accomplished and prolific eye surgeon who volunteers his services to the global poor via SEE International, an NGO with a focus on curing blindness. He is seen examining patients after he haHe and his wife Preeti are seen examining and performing eye surgery at the Shri Bhojay Sarvodaya Eye hospital close to the India Pakistan border. This is a new hospital that offers modern facilities to SEE where Janak can run a blindness camp as well as perform the surgeries required. Janak graduated from the University of Bombay in 1991, and completed his residency in ophthalmology in 1996. He’s been volunteering with SEE International as an eye surgeon since 1996, and in 2013, passed the milestone of 100 SEE expeditions. He is SEE’s most prolific doctor and has worked in places like the Peruvian Jungle, Gaza Strip, Lebanon, Mongolia, China, Brazil and many other remote locations. He has worked all over India and has performed thousands of eye surgeries, addressing every kind of illness. Janak is a proud adherent of the Jainism religion; he is a strong believer in their religious tenants of mankind being one. Janak often works with his wife Preeti, herself a talented eye surgeon. Together they are a formidable force and can work quickly on a multitude of surgeries in a single day. They have two daughters, one of 11 and the other 15. Both girls often travel with their parents on their volunteer trips for SEE and actively assistant in patient diagnosis as well as assisting their parents in surgery. Janak and Preeti both believe this gives the girls a real perspective on their place in the world and helps to bind them as a family unit. The Shahs live in Mumbai, India and run a successful eye surgery practice when they are not volunteering for SEE International. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis)
 SILIGURI, DARJEELING DISTRICT, INDIA, JULY 22 2015: Dr Janak Shah is an accomplished and prolific eye surgeon who volunteers his services to the global poor via SEE International, an NGO with a focus on curing blindness. He is seen examining and performing eye surgery at the Baba Loknath Eye Mission hospital. This is a long established religious mission that offers facilities to SEE where Janak can run a blindness camp as well as perform the surgeries required. Janak graduated from the University of Bombay in 1991, and completed his residency in ophthalmology in 1996. He’s been volunteering with SEE International as an eye surgeon since 1996, and in 2013, passed the milestone of 100 SEE expeditions. He is SEE’s most prolific doctor and has worked in places like the Peruvian Jungle, Gaza Strip, Lebanon, Mongolia, China, Brazil and many other remote locations. He has worked all over India and has performed thousands of eye surgeries, addressing every kind of illness. Janak is a proud adherent of the Jainism religion; he is a strong believer in their religious tenants of mankind being one. Janak often works with his wife Preeti, herself a talented eye surgeon. Together they are a formidable force and can work quickly on a multitude of surgeries in a single day. They have two daughters, one of 11 and the other 15. Both girls often travel with their parents on their volunteer trips for SEE and actively assistant in patient diagnosis as well as assisting their parents in surgery. Janak and Preeti both believe this gives the girls a real perspective on their place in the world and helps to bind them as a family unit. The Shahs live in Mumbai, India and run a successful eye surgery practice when they are not volunteering for SEE International. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis)
 KISUMU, KENYA, 18 JUNE 2015: A mother and child under mosquito netting, a major weapon in these rural areas in the fight against Malaria. A Malaria surveilance team from the Walter Read Project on Malaria undertakes daily case studies in the Nyanza District of Kisumu, Kenya. The surveilance team will typically weight the child, take down the family details and medical history, conduct a Rapid Test for malaria, draw a blood sample and continue to monitor that child for up to a 4 year period. Their work is invaluable in providing samples to monitor the path and progress and mutation of Malaria. Seven different teams work 5 days a week, visiting 5 households per day across the Nyanza district. Agnes Akoth Onyango, 57, is the Chief Nurse of the Walter Read Project, Kisumu, Kenya. Agnes is seen at the Kemri Insectology lab where mosquitos are specifically bred for Malaria research. Agnes has been a front line nurse in the fight against Malaria for over 31 years. She administers the staff at the Walter Read research facility and also has strong relations with the Kombewa District hospital. Agnes works with a number of field surveillance teams who monitor the population of the Nyanza province of Kenya, helping to maintain and update Walter Read’s case studies of over 40 years research into Malaria. Agnes supervises the teams, works with the laboratory staff and the local hospitals in keeping an up to date record on the progress of Malaria, staying one step ahead of the disease which kills over 5 million people annually. She also works with the Kemri group of disease research facilities in the Kisumu area. These provide a valuable database for the mutation of the Malaria parasite, helping to develop effective medication to combat the disease. Agnes has devoted her life to this theme, finding self-worth and tremendous satisfaction in her work. She is well know across her community and still finds time to go with surveillance teams to build case studies as well lecture on M
 KISUMU, KENYA, 21 JUNE 2015: Agnes Akoth Onyango, 57, Chief Nurse of the Walter Read Project, Kisumu, Kenya. Agnes has been a front line nurse in the fight against Malaria for over 31 years. She administers the staff at the Walter Read research facility and also has strong relations with the Kombewa District hospital. Agnes works with a number of field surveillance teams who monitor the population of the Nyanza province of Kenya, helping to maintain and update Walter Read’s case studies of over 40 years research into Malaria. Agnes supervises the teams, works with the laboratory staff and the local hospitals in keeping an up to date record on the progress of Malaria, staying one step ahead of the disease which kills over 5 million people annually. She also works with the Kemri group of disease research facilities in the Kisumu area. These provide a valuable database for the mutation of the Malaria parasite, helping to develop effective medication to combat the disease. Agnes has devoted her life to this theme, finding self-worth and tremendous satisfaction in her work. She is well know across her community and still finds time to go with surveillance teams to build case studies as well lecture on Malaria education when she can make the time. Agnes remains hopeful for the eradication of Malaria, believing a cure is within our grasp if research and funding is maintained. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis)
 1. KISUMU, KENYA, 21 JUNE 2015: Agnes Akoth Onyango, 57, Chief Nurse of the Walter Read Project, Kisumu, Kenya. Agnes has been a front line nurse in the fight against Malaria for over 31 years. Here she is seen dealing with a child who has the dual complications of severe burns as well as Malaria. This has to be handled carefully as the medications can conflict with each other in the child's delicate body. Agnes has 31 years of experience with this kind of complication. Her chief role is to administer the staff at the Walter Read research facility and also has strong relations with the Kombewa District hospital. Agnes works with a number of field surveillance teams who monitor the population of the Nyanza province of Kenya, helping to maintain and update Walter Read’s case studies of over 40 years research into Malaria. Agnes supervises the teams, works with the laboratory staff and the local hospitals in keeping an up to date record on the progress of Malaria, staying one step ahead of the disease which kills over 5 million people annually. She also works with the Kemri group of disease research facilities in the Kisumu area. These provide a valuable database for the mutation of the Malaria parasite, helping to develop effective medication to combat the disease. Agnes has devoted her life to this theme, finding self-worth and tremendous satisfaction in her work. She is well know across her community and still finds time to go with surveillance teams to build case studies as well lecture on Malaria education when she can make the time. Agnes remains hopeful for the eradication of Malaria, believing a cure is within our grasp if research and funding is maintained. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis)
 KISUMU, KENYA, 21 JUNE 2015: Rural homes in the rain close to the Walter Read Project, Kisumu, Kenya. Agnes Akoth Onyango, 57, Chief Nurse of the Walter Read Project, Agnes has been a front line nurse in the fight against Malaria for over 31 years. She administers the staff at the Walter Read research facility and also has strong relations with the Kombewa District hospital. Agnes works with a number of field surveillance teams who monitor the population of the Nyanza province of Kenya, helping to maintain and update Walter Read’s case studies of over 40 years research into Malaria. Agnes supervises the teams, works with the laboratory staff and the local hospitals in keeping an up to date record on the progress of Malaria, staying one step ahead of the disease which kills over 5 million people annually. She also works with the Kemri group of disease research facilities in the Kisumu area. These provide a valuable database for the mutation of the Malaria parasite, helping to develop effective medication to combat the disease. Agnes has devoted her life to this theme, finding self-worth and tremendous satisfaction in her work. She is well know across her community and still finds time to go with surveillance teams to build case studies as well lecture on Malaria education when she can make the time. Agnes remains hopeful for the eradication of Malaria, believing a cure is within our grasp if research and funding is maintained. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis)
 KISUMU, KENYA, 21 JUNE 2015: Three woman from the Legion of Mary, a popular religious group in the Kisumu region of Kenya. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis)
 KISUMU, KENYA, 18 JUNE 2015: A malaria surveilance team from the Walter Read Project on Malaria undertakes a case study on a young child in the Nyanza District of Kisumu, Kenya. This boy is in a febrile state, with advanced Malaria parasites attacking the red blood cells in his body. He was taken to hospital immediately after permission was obtained from the head of the household. The surveilance team will typically weight the child, take down the family details and medical history, conduct a Rapid Test for malaria, draw a blood sample and continue to monitor that child for up to a 4 year period. Their work is invaluable in providing samples to monitor the path and progress and mutation of Malaria. Seven different teams work 5 days a week, visiting 5 households per day across the Nyanza district. Agnes Akoth Onyango, 57, is the Chief Nurse of the Walter Read Project, Kisumu, Kenya. Agnes is seen at the Kemri Insectology lab where mosquitos are specifically bred for Malaria research. Agnes has been a front line nurse in the fight against Malaria for over 31 years. She administers the staff at the Walter Read research facility and also has strong relations with the Kombewa District hospital. Agnes works with a number of field surveillance teams who monitor the population of the Nyanza province of Kenya, helping to maintain and update Walter Read’s case studies of over 40 years research into Malaria. Agnes supervises the teams, works with the laboratory staff and the local hospitals in keeping an up to date record on the progress of Malaria, staying one step ahead of the disease which kills over 5 million people annually. She also works with the Kemri group of disease research facilities in the Kisumu area. These provide a valuable database for the mutation of the Malaria parasite, helping to develop effective medication to combat the disease. Agnes has devoted her life to this theme, finding self-worth and tremendous satisfaction in her work. She is well know across
 KISUMU, KENYA, 18 JUNE 2015: A malaria surveilance team from the Walter Read Project on Malaria undertakes a case study on a young child in the Nyanza District of Kisumu, Kenya. They will weight the child, take down the family details and medical history, conduct a Rapid Test for malaria, draw a blood sample and continue to monitor that child for up to a 4 year period. Their work is invaluable in providing samples to monitor the path and progress and mutation of Malaria. Seven different teams work 5 days a week, visiting 5 households per day across the Nyanza district. Agnes Akoth Onyango, 57, is the Chief Nurse of the Walter Read Project, Kisumu, Kenya. Agnes is seen at the Kemri Insectology lab where mosquitos are specifically bred for Malaria research. Agnes has been a front line nurse in the fight against Malaria for over 31 years. She administers the staff at the Walter Read research facility and also has strong relations with the Kombewa District hospital. Agnes works with a number of field surveillance teams who monitor the population of the Nyanza province of Kenya, helping to maintain and update Walter Read’s case studies of over 40 years research into Malaria. Agnes supervises the teams, works with the laboratory staff and the local hospitals in keeping an up to date record on the progress of Malaria, staying one step ahead of the disease which kills over 5 million people annually. She also works with the Kemri group of disease research facilities in the Kisumu area. These provide a valuable database for the mutation of the Malaria parasite, helping to develop effective medication to combat the disease. Agnes has devoted her life to this theme, finding self-worth and tremendous satisfaction in her work. She is well know across her community and still finds time to go with surveillance teams to build case studies as well lecture on Malaria education when she can make the time. Agnes remains hopeful for the eradication of Malaria, believing a cure is withi
 KISUMU, KENYA, 18 JUNE 2015: A Malaria surveilance team from the Walter Read Project on Malaria undertakes a case study on a young child in the Nyanza District of Kisumu, Kenya. They will weight the child, take down the family details and medical history, conduct a Rapid Test for malaria, draw a blood sample and continue to monitor that child for up to a 4 year period. Their work is invaluable in providing samples to monitor the path and progress and mutation of Malaria. Seven different teams work 5 days a week, visiting 5 households per day across the Nyanza district. Agnes Akoth Onyango, 57, is the Chief Nurse of the Walter Read Project, Kisumu, Kenya. Agnes is seen at the Kemri Insectology lab where mosquitos are specifically bred for Malaria research. Agnes has been a front line nurse in the fight against Malaria for over 31 years. She administers the staff at the Walter Read research facility and also has strong relations with the Kombewa District hospital. Agnes works with a number of field surveillance teams who monitor the population of the Nyanza province of Kenya, helping to maintain and update Walter Read’s case studies of over 40 years research into Malaria. Agnes supervises the teams, works with the laboratory staff and the local hospitals in keeping an up to date record on the progress of Malaria, staying one step ahead of the disease which kills over 5 million people annually. She also works with the Kemri group of disease research facilities in the Kisumu area. These provide a valuable database for the mutation of the Malaria parasite, helping to develop effective medication to combat the disease. Agnes has devoted her life to this theme, finding self-worth and tremendous satisfaction in her work. She is well know across her community and still finds time to go with surveillance teams to build case studies as well lecture on Malaria education when she can make the time. Agnes remains hopeful for the eradication of Malaria, believing a cure is withi
 KISUMU, KENYA, 18 JUNE 2015: Kenyan farmer's and parents Norman and Akinyi Otieno mourn the loss of a child two weeks previously to Malaria. This is the second child they have lost to the disease. 5 million people are estimated to die annually from the disease, the rural poor of Africa are amongst the most vulnerable. Agnes Akoth Onyango, 57, is the Chief Nurse of the Walter Read Project, Kisumu, Kenya. Agnes is seen at the Kemri Insectology lab where mosquitos are specifically bred for Malaria research. Agnes has been a front line nurse in the fight against Malaria for over 31 years. She administers the staff at the Walter Read research facility and also has strong relations with the Kombewa District hospital. Agnes works with a number of field surveillance teams who monitor the population of the Nyanza province of Kenya, helping to maintain and update Walter Read’s case studies of over 40 years research into Malaria. Agnes supervises the teams, works with the laboratory staff and the local hospitals in keeping an up to date record on the progress of Malaria, staying one step ahead of the disease which kills over 5 million people annually. She also works with the Kemri group of disease research facilities in the Kisumu area. These provide a valuable database for the mutation of the Malaria parasite, helping to develop effective medication to combat the disease. Agnes has devoted her life to this theme, finding self-worth and tremendous satisfaction in her work. She is well know across her community and still finds time to go with surveillance teams to build case studies as well lecture on Malaria education when she can make the time. Agnes remains hopeful for the eradication of Malaria, believing a cure is within our grasp if research and funding is maintained. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis)
 KISUMU, KENYA, 18 JUNE 2015: A mother and child under mosquito netting, a major weapon in these rural areas in the fight against Malaria. A Malaria surveilance team from the Walter Read Project on Malaria undertakes daily case studies in the Nyanza District of Kisumu, Kenya. The surveilance team will typically weight the child, take down the family details and medical history, conduct a Rapid Test for malaria, draw a blood sample and continue to monitor that child for up to a 4 year period. Their work is invaluable in providing samples to monitor the path and progress and mutation of Malaria. Seven different teams work 5 days a week, visiting 5 households per day across the Nyanza district. Agnes Akoth Onyango, 57, is the Chief Nurse of the Walter Read Project, Kisumu, Kenya. Agnes is seen at the Kemri Insectology lab where mosquitos are specifically bred for Malaria research. Agnes has been a front line nurse in the fight against Malaria for over 31 years. She administers the staff at the Walter Read research facility and also has strong relations with the Kombewa District hospital. Agnes works with a number of field surveillance teams who monitor the population of the Nyanza province of Kenya, helping to maintain and update Walter Read’s case studies of over 40 years research into Malaria. Agnes supervises the teams, works with the laboratory staff and the local hospitals in keeping an up to date record on the progress of Malaria, staying one step ahead of the disease which kills over 5 million people annually. She also works with the Kemri group of disease research facilities in the Kisumu area. These provide a valuable database for the mutation of the Malaria parasite, helping to develop effective medication to combat the disease. Agnes has devoted her life to this theme, finding self-worth and tremendous satisfaction in her work. She is well know across her community and still finds time to go with surveillance teams to build case studies as well lecture on M
 KISUMU, KENYA, 21 JUNE 2015: Agnes Akoth Onyango, 57, Chief Nurse of the Walter Read Project, Kisumu, Kenya, gives an educational lecture on Malaria to schoolchildren at the Diemo primary school close to the Walter Read facility. Agnes has been a front line nurse in the fight against Malaria for over 31 years. She administers the staff at the Walter Read research facility and also has strong relations with the Kombewa District hospital. Agnes works with a number of field surveillance teams who monitor the population of the Nyanza province of Kenya, helping to maintain and update Walter Read’s case studies of over 40 years research into Malaria. Agnes supervises the teams, works with the laboratory staff and the local hospitals in keeping an up to date record on the progress of Malaria, staying one step ahead of the disease which kills over 5 million people annually. She also works with the Kemri group of disease research facilities in the Kisumu area. These provide a valuable database for the mutation of the Malaria parasite, helping to develop effective medication to combat the disease. Agnes has devoted her life to this theme, finding self-worth and tremendous satisfaction in her work. She is well know across her community and still finds time to go with surveillance teams to build case studies as well lecture on Malaria education when she can make the time. Agnes remains hopeful for the eradication of Malaria, believing a cure is within our grasp if research and funding is maintained. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis)
 CHONGWE DISTRICT, ZAMBIA, 14 JANUARY 2014: Rural community health care worker Dismuss,44, updates his medical records at his home in the Chongwe district of rural Zambia. Dismuss lives a distance of 14 kilometers from the nearest clinic and services over 500 households in his area. He adminsters rapid testing for Malaria and adminsters Coartem anti-Malarials for both adults and children. Dismuss is a volunteer worker and receives no pay for this work. He has 9 children and his wife was recently diagnosed with Leukemia. Chongwe District, Zambia. (Photo by Brent Stirton for Novartis)
 CHONGWE DISTRICT, ZAMBIA, 14 JANUARY 2014: Rural community health care worker Dismuss,44, holds a small Malaria care workshop in the Chongwe district of rural Zambia. Dismuss lives a distance of 14 kilometers from the nearest clinic and services over 500 households in his area. He adminsters rapid testing for Malaria and adminsters Coartem anti-Malarials for both adults and children. Dismuss is a volunteer worker and receives no pay for this work. He has 9 children and his wife was recently diagnosed with Leukemia. Chongwe District, Zambia. (Photo by Brent Stirton for Novartis)
 CHONGWE DISTRICT, ZAMBIA, 14 JANUARY 2014: Rural community health care worker Dismuss,44, performs a rapid test for Malaria on a young boy in the Chongwe district in rural Zambia. Dismuss lives a distance of 14 kilometers from the nearest clinic and services over 500 households in his area. He adminsters rapid testing for Malaria and adminsters Coartem anti-Malarials for both adults and children. Dismuss is a volunteer worker and receives no pay for this work. He has 9 children and his wife was recently diagnosed with Leukemia. Chongwe District, Zambia. (Photo by Brent Stirton for Novartis)
 CHONGWE DISTRICT, ZAMBIA, 14 JANUARY 2014: Rural community health care worker Dismuss,44, seen with his bicycle ambulance in the Chongwe district in rural Zambia. Dismuss lives a distance of 14 kilometers from the nearest clinic and services over 500 households in his area. He adminsters rapid testing for Malaria and adminsters Coartem anti-Malarials for both adults and children. Dismuss is a volunteer worker and receives no pay for this work. He has 9 children and his wife was recently diagnosed with Leukemia. Chongwe District, Zambia. (Photo by Brent Stirton for Novartis)
 CHONGWE DISTRICT, ZAMBIA, 14 JANUARY 2014: Rural community health care worker Dismuss,44, performs a rapid test for Malaria on a young mother in the Chongwe district in rural Zambia. Dismuss lives a distance of 14 kilometers from the nearest clinic and services over 500 households in his area. He adminsters rapid testing for Malaria and adminsters Coartem anti-Malarials for both adults and children. Dismuss is a volunteer worker and receives no pay for this work. He has 9 children and his wife was recently diagnosed with Leukemia. Chongwe District, Zambia. (Photo by Brent Stirton for Novartis)
 CHONGWE DISTRICT, ZAMBIA, 14 JANUARY 2014: Rural community health care worker Dismuss,44, pedals his bicycle ambulance on the way to the rural Chongwe community clinic, delivering a young boy suffering from Malaria. Dismuss lives a distance of 14 kilometers from the clinic and services over 500 households in his area. He adminsters rapid testing for Malaria and adminster Coartem anti-Malarials for both adults and children. Dismuss is a volunteer worker and receives no pay for this work. He has 9 children and his wife was recently diagnosed with Leukemia. Chongwe District, Zambia. (Photo by Brent Stirton for Novartis)
 CHONGWE DISTRICT, ZAMBIA, 14 JANUARY 2014: Rural community health care nurse, Sister Betty Habulembe at work in the rural Chongwe community clinic, Zambia. Betty is testing and administering Coartem anti-Malarials to Micho Kaulwe, who is suffering from Malaria.  (Photo by Brent Stirton for Novartis)
 NDOLA, ZAMBIA, 16 JANUARY 2014: Lab technican Mbanga Mmleba and Dr Christine Manyando of the Tropical Disease Research center at Ndola Central Hospital, Zambia. They are seen in a Mosquito breeding facility, Mmleba is capturing Malaria bearing mosquitos for examination under the microscope. (Photo by Brent Stirton for Novartis.)
 NDOLA, ZAMBIA, 16 JANUARY 2014: Lab technican Osbert Namafente of the Tropical Disease Research center at Ndola Central Hospital, Zambia. Osbert is seen examining Malaria bearing mosquitos under the microscope. This lab is seeking vectors for the disease, identifying carriers and strains of malaria from Mosquitos captured all over Zambia. (Photo by Brent Stirton for Novartis.)
 NDOLA, ZAMBIA, 16 JANUARY 2014: Lab technican Mbanga Mmleba of the Tropical Disease Research center at Ndola Central Hospital, Zambia. He is seen in a Mosquito breeding facility where Mmleba is using an aspirator for capturing Malaria bearing mosquitos for examination under the microscope. This lab attempts to map vectors for the disease by identifying which mosquitos are carrying which version of the disease. (Photo by Brent Stirton for Novartis.)
 NDOLA, ZAMBIA, 16 JANUARY 2014: Researcher Eric M. Njunju prepares samples to identify the DNA strand of the Malaria pathogen at the Tropical Disease Research center at Ndola Central Hospital, Zambia. This technique is the most accurate manner by which to test for Malaria. (Photo by Brent Stirton for Novartis.)
 NDOLA, ZAMBIA, 16 JANUARY 2014: Dr Christine Manyando examines a young child who has severe Malaria at the Arthur Davidson Children's Hospital, Ndola, Zambia. This child's condition is so severe that she is undergoing a blood transfusion in an attempt to remove the Malaria parasite from her young body. (Photo by Brent Stirton for Novartis.)
 LUSAKA, ZAMBIA, 15 JANUARY 2014: Images from the Zambian Health Ministry's Medical Storage and Distribution center in Lusaka. Anti-malarial treatments first land at this facility and from here they are stored and distributed across the country. (Photo by Brent Stirton for Novartis.)
 KISUMU, KENYA, 21 JUNE 2015: Sister Pheobe Odera suffers from both Diabetes and Hypertension but struggles to find medication despite working in a district hospital. She claims she is growing weaker and a simple cold can see her bed-ridden. Diabetes is on the rise in Africa, where non-communicable diseases are rising steadily, adding to the strain the more traditional diseases already place on populations. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis)
 CHONGWE DISTRICT HOSPITAL, ZAMBIA, 14 JANUARY 2014: Child patient Blessings Nanyangwe is examined by doctors inside the malaria ward inside Chongwe District Hospital, Zambia. Blessing was brought in to the hospital five days previously with critical Malaria. Swift treatment with Coartem and a quinine solution has stabilized her and rid her body of the Malaria parasites. She is due to be discharged today. (Photo by Brent Stirton for Novartis)
 PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA, USA, 15 JULY 2015: Dr Carl June, head of the Cart19 cancer program at UPenn surveys the Philadelphia skyline from the construction platform for his new laboratory. The lab is being built with help from Novartis who have supported Dr June for a number of years. Dr June has pioneered new Gene therapy in the search for a cure for cancer, revolutionizing how we may come to conquer the disease. He and his team have developed a means by which to use the HIV virus as a targeting vector for cancer cells, allowing the patients own T-cells to go to war once they have been turned into super cells and re-injected into the patients body. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis.)
 MORRIS PLAINS, NEW JERSEY, 9 JULY 2015: Research scientists process human T cells inside the cell processing facility at the Morris Plains, New Jersey Novartis facility. This laboratory is where the T cells of cancer patients are processed and turned into super cells as part of a revolutionary new Gene therapy based cancer treatment Novartis is a part of. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis.)
 PHILADELPHIA, PA, 7 JUNE 2014: Doug Olson, 67,  had been living with chronic lymphocytic leukemia, or CLL, for 14 years. By 2010, after four rounds of chemotherapy, his only option seemed to be a bone marrow transplant with a 50 percent chance of success. That's when he became Upenn’s Patient Number Three in a gene therapy experiment designed to manipulate his immune system. The weapon is drawn from a patient's own body. Doctors at the University of Pennsylvania remove "T cells," or white blood cells that help fight infections. The cells are then genetically modified to recognize and attack cancer cells. One amazing aspect is the use of a modified HIV virus as a delivery system for the modified T cells. "The T cell can grow and divide," says oncologist Dr. David Porter, who is part of the team overseeing the therapy. "In fact, we've seen for every T cell that we genetically modify and put into a patient's body, it has the ability to kill up to 93,000 leukemia cells." In Olson's case, it took just three weeks to work. More than three years later, Olson is still in complete remission, and the modified T cells are still circulating. The hope is to use this same technique to make other types of cancer cells more visible to the body's immune system. At this time the UPenn medical team have a 86% success rate with this gene therapy in over 150 patients, signifying what is perhaps the greatest breakthrough yet in the fight against cancer. Doug Olson has been clear of cancer for over 4 years now. The first thing he did when he heard he was clear of cancer cells, was to go out and buy a boat. He enjoys sailing that with his grandkids, he runs regularly, maintains a healthy lifestyle and is a passionate advocate for this revolutionary cancer therapy. He spoke recently with Pennsylvania State legislators as the value of the program. Doug is a former Scientist by profession and is well qualified to speak on this treatment, both with the scientists and doctors at Upenn and als
 PHILADELPHIA, PA, 7 JUNE 2014: Doug Olson, 67,  had been living with chronic lymphocytic leukemia, or CLL, for 14 years. By 2010, after four rounds of chemotherapy, his only option seemed to be a bone marrow transplant with a 50 percent chance of success. That's when he became Upenn’s Patient Number Three in a gene therapy experiment designed to manipulate his immune system. The weapon is drawn from a patient's own body. Doctors at the University of Pennsylvania remove "T cells," or white blood cells that help fight infections. The cells are then genetically modified to recognize and attack cancer cells. One amazing aspect is the use of a modified HIV virus as a delivery system for the modified T cells. "The T cell can grow and divide," says oncologist Dr. David Porter, who is part of the team overseeing the therapy. "In fact, we've seen for every T cell that we genetically modify and put into a patient's body, it has the ability to kill up to 93,000 leukemia cells." In Olson's case, it took just three weeks to work. More than three years later, Olson is still in complete remission, and the modified T cells are still circulating. The hope is to use this same technique to make other types of cancer cells more visible to the body's immune system. At this time the UPenn medical team have a 86% success rate with this gene therapy in over 150 patients, signifying what is perhaps the greatest breakthrough yet in the fight against cancer. Doug Olson has been clear of cancer for over 4 years now. The first thing he did when he heard he was clear of cancer cells, was to go out and buy a boat. He enjoys sailing that with his grandkids, he runs regularly, maintains a healthy lifestyle and is a passionate advocate for this revolutionary cancer therapy. He spoke recently with Pennsylvania State legislators as the value of the program. Doug is a former Scientist by profession and is well qualified to speak on this treatment, both with the scientists and doctors at Upenn and als
 PENNSYLVANIA, PA, 8 JUNE 2014: Emily Whitehead is a former Leukemia patient  who at age 7 became Patient Zero in a revolutionary UPenn Medical gene therapy experiment designed to manipulate her immune system. Emily is seen with her parent Tom and Kari, since her remission Emily likes to spend time riding her ATV bike, hanging out with her dog and recently tried horse-riding for the first time. She has gone from being a final stage Cancer case to living life as a normal girl. The weapon which cured her is drawn from a patient's own body. Doctors at the University of Pennsylvania remove "T cells," or white blood cells that help fight infections. The cells are then genetically modified to recognize and attack cancer cells. One amazing aspect is the use of a modified HIV virus as a delivery system for the modified T cells. "The T cell can grow and divide," says oncologist Dr. David Porter, who is part of the team overseeing the therapy. "In fact, we've seen for every T cell that we genetically modify and put into a patient's body, it has the ability to kill up to 93,000 leukemia cells.
These are words from a blog the Whitehead family put out to illuminate Emily's case: 
"Hi, I’m Emily!
On Friday, May 28, 2010, just a few weeks after my 5th birthday, I was diagnosed with standard risk pre-b acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) at Hershey Medical Center.   I was supposed to get chemotherapy treatments for 26 months and doctors said I had an 85%-90% chance of being cured; however, on October 6, 2011 I found out my leukemia relapsed and then they told me I only had a 30% chance of being cured.  I received aggressive chemotherapy through January 2012 and was scheduled for a bone marrow transplant in February 2012; however, I found out on February 4, 2012, just two weeks before my transplant, that I relapsed again. Doctors tried more chemotherapy through the months of February and March but could not get me back into remission. At that point, doctors said that I was not going
 PENNSYLVANIA, PA, 8 JUNE 2014: Emily Whitehead is a former Leukemia patient  who at age 7 became Patient Zero in a revolutionary UPenn Medical gene therapy experiment designed to manipulate her immune system. Emily is seen with her parent Tom and Kari, since her remission Emily likes to spend time riding her ATV bike, hanging out with her dog and recently tried horse-riding for the first time. She has gone from being a final stage Cancer case to living life as a normal girl. The weapon which cured her is drawn from a patient's own body. Doctors at the University of Pennsylvania remove "T cells," or white blood cells that help fight infections. The cells are then genetically modified to recognize and attack cancer cells. One amazing aspect is the use of a modified HIV virus as a delivery system for the modified T cells. "The T cell can grow and divide," says oncologist Dr. David Porter, who is part of the team overseeing the therapy. "In fact, we've seen for every T cell that we genetically modify and put into a patient's body, it has the ability to kill up to 93,000 leukemia cells.
These are words from a blog the Whitehead family put out to illuminate Emily's case: 
"Hi, I’m Emily!
On Friday, May 28, 2010, just a few weeks after my 5th birthday, I was diagnosed with standard risk pre-b acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) at Hershey Medical Center.   I was supposed to get chemotherapy treatments for 26 months and doctors said I had an 85%-90% chance of being cured; however, on October 6, 2011 I found out my leukemia relapsed and then they told me I only had a 30% chance of being cured.  I received aggressive chemotherapy through January 2012 and was scheduled for a bone marrow transplant in February 2012; however, I found out on February 4, 2012, just two weeks before my transplant, that I relapsed again. Doctors tried more chemotherapy through the months of February and March but could not get me back into remission. At that point, doctors said that I was not going
 PENNSYLVANIA, PA, 8 JUNE 2014: Emily Whitehead is a former Leukemia patient  who at age 7 became Patient Zero in a revolutionary UPenn Medical gene therapy experiment designed to manipulate her immune system. Emily is seen with her parent Tom and Kari, since her remission Emily likes to spend time riding her ATV bike, hanging out with her dog and recently tried horse-riding for the first time. She has gone from being a final stage Cancer case to living life as a normal girl. The weapon which cured her is drawn from a patient's own body. Doctors at the University of Pennsylvania remove "T cells," or white blood cells that help fight infections. The cells are then genetically modified to recognize and attack cancer cells. One amazing aspect is the use of a modified HIV virus as a delivery system for the modified T cells. "The T cell can grow and divide," says oncologist Dr. David Porter, who is part of the team overseeing the therapy. "In fact, we've seen for every T cell that we genetically modify and put into a patient's body, it has the ability to kill up to 93,000 leukemia cells.
These are words from a blog the Whitehead family put out to illuminate Emily's case: 
"Hi, I’m Emily!
On Friday, May 28, 2010, just a few weeks after my 5th birthday, I was diagnosed with standard risk pre-b acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) at Hershey Medical Center.   I was supposed to get chemotherapy treatments for 26 months and doctors said I had an 85%-90% chance of being cured; however, on October 6, 2011 I found out my leukemia relapsed and then they told me I only had a 30% chance of being cured.  I received aggressive chemotherapy through January 2012 and was scheduled for a bone marrow transplant in February 2012; however, I found out on February 4, 2012, just two weeks before my transplant, that I relapsed again. Doctors tried more chemotherapy through the months of February and March but could not get me back into remission. At that point, doctors said that I was not going
 PENNSYLVANIA, PA, 8 JUNE 2014: Emily Whitehead is a former Leukemia patient  who at age 7 became Patient Zero in a revolutionary UPenn Medical gene therapy experiment designed to manipulate her immune system. Emily is seen with her parent Tom and Kari, since her remission Emily likes to spend time riding her ATV bike, hanging out with her dog and recently tried horse-riding for the first time. She has gone from being a final stage Cancer case to living life as a normal girl. The weapon which cured her is drawn from a patient's own body. Doctors at the University of Pennsylvania remove "T cells," or white blood cells that help fight infections. The cells are then genetically modified to recognize and attack cancer cells. One amazing aspect is the use of a modified HIV virus as a delivery system for the modified T cells. "The T cell can grow and divide," says oncologist Dr. David Porter, who is part of the team overseeing the therapy. "In fact, we've seen for every T cell that we genetically modify and put into a patient's body, it has the ability to kill up to 93,000 leukemia cells.
These are words from a blog the Whitehead family put out to illuminate Emily's case: 
"Hi, I’m Emily!
On Friday, May 28, 2010, just a few weeks after my 5th birthday, I was diagnosed with standard risk pre-b acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) at Hershey Medical Center.   I was supposed to get chemotherapy treatments for 26 months and doctors said I had an 85%-90% chance of being cured; however, on October 6, 2011 I found out my leukemia relapsed and then they told me I only had a 30% chance of being cured.  I received aggressive chemotherapy through January 2012 and was scheduled for a bone marrow transplant in February 2012; however, I found out on February 4, 2012, just two weeks before my transplant, that I relapsed again. Doctors tried more chemotherapy through the months of February and March but could not get me back into remission. At that point, doctors said that I was not going
 PHILIDELPHIA, PA, USA, 9 JUNE 2014: Oncologist Dr. David Porter is part of the UPenn team overseeing the radical new cancer treatment therapy for the Cart 19 program. The treatment is based on a gene therapy experiment designed to manipulate the bodies own immune system. The weapon is drawn from a patient's own body. Doctors at the University of Pennsylvania remove "T cells," or white blood cells that help fight infections. The cells are then genetically modified to recognize and attack cancer cells. One amazing aspect is the use of a modified HIV virus as a delivery system for the modified T cells. "The T cell can grow and divide," says oncologist Dr. David Porter, who is part of the team overseeing the therapy. "In fact, we've seen for every T cell that we genetically modify and put into a patient's body, it has the ability to kill up to 93,000 leukemia cells." The hope is to use this same technique to make other types of cancer cells more visible to the body's immune system. At this time the UPenn medical team have a 86% success rate with this gene therapy in over 150 patients, signifying what is perhaps the greatest breakthrough yet in the fight against cancer. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage for Novartis.)
 TROY, NEW YORK, 5 MAY 2014: Esme' Savoie, 3, suffers from a rare genetic disease know as PCDH19, a genetically mutated orphan disease of the kind which Novartis's N.I.B.R division feels they can learn a great deal, Troy, NY, 5 May 2014. Esme' is seen on her way to a a check up at Boston Childrens Hospital. She has a feeding tube which is permanently implanted in her stomach through which she receives all her meals. Esme's parents Hillary and Andre Savoie have become experts in Esme's syndrome and are involved in fundraising for continued research and are a study case for Boston Childrens hospital and Novartis. PCDH19 Female Limited Epilepsy has been diagnosed in approximately 200 girls and women worldwide. PCDH19 FLE have been associated with the occurrence of epilepsy, a spectrum of developmental delays, and behavioral issues that occur almost exclusively in girls and women. Novartis is one of the few big pharmaceutical companies which is doing extensive research into diseases of the brain. This is particularly important now as autism numbers are increasing and it is estimated that as many as 1 in 50 children is currently affected by this syndrome in one from or another. Novartis has made remarkable strides in their developments and Ricardo Dolmetsch, head of research, feels confident of major breakthroughs in the next few years. 
PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) has a spectrum of symptoms. Almost all of the girls affected by PCDH19 mutations exhibit seizures of many types, but the most typical characteristic of PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) is the tendency of the seizures to cluster and interfere with breathing (causing cyanotic spells). Some of the girls affected with PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) have cognitive delays, much of the research indicates that about two-thirds of the girls have Intellectual Delay (ID) ranging from mild to moderate. Additionally, about 40% of the girls with PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) are on the autism spectrum. Many of those with PCDH19 also exhibit behavioral and psychological prob
 TROY, NEW YORK, 5 MAY 2014: Esme' Savoie, 3, suffers from a rare genetic disease know as PCDH19, a genetically mutated orphan disease of the kind which Novartis's N.I.B.R division feels they can learn a great deal, Troy, NY, 5 May 2014. Esme' is seen at Boston Childrens Hospital at her first ever dentists appointment. Esme's parents Hillary and Andre Savoie have become experts in Esme's syndrome and are involved in fundraising for continued research and are a study case for Boston Childrens hospital and Novartis. PCDH19 Female Limited Epilepsy has been diagnosed in approximately 200 girls and women worldwide. PCDH19 FLE have been associated with the occurrence of epilepsy, a spectrum of developmental delays, and behavioral issues that occur almost exclusively in girls and women. Novartis is one of the few big pharmaceutical companies which is doing extensive research into diseases of the brain. This is particularly important now as autism numbers are increasing and it is estimated that as many as 1 in 50 children is currently affected by this syndrome in one from or another. Novartis has made remarkable strides in their developments and Ricardo Dolmetsch, head of research, feels confident of major breakthroughs in the next few years. 
PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) has a spectrum of symptoms. Almost all of the girls affected by PCDH19 mutations exhibit seizures of many types, but the most typical characteristic of PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) is the tendency of the seizures to cluster and interfere with breathing (causing cyanotic spells). Some of the girls affected with PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) have cognitive delays, much of the research indicates that about two-thirds of the girls have Intellectual Delay (ID) ranging from mild to moderate. Additionally, about 40% of the girls with PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) are on the autism spectrum. Many of those with PCDH19 also exhibit behavioral and psychological problems including aggression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and, in some cases, schizophrenia. PCDH19
 TROY, NEW YORK, 5 MAY 2014: Hillary Savoie takes her daughter outside for a bubble blowing session at their home in Troy, New york. Esme' Savoie, 3, suffers from a rare genetic disease know as PCDH19, a genetically mutated orphan disease of the kind which Novartis's N.I.B.R division feels they can learn a great deal, Troy, NY, 5 May 2014. Esme's parents Hillary and Andre Savoie have become experts in Esme's syndrome and are involved in fundraising for continued research and are a study case for Boston Childrens hospital and Novartis. PCDH19 Female Limited Epilepsy has been diagnosed in approximately 200 girls and women worldwide. PCDH19 FLE have been associated with the occurrence of epilepsy, a spectrum of developmental delays, and behavioral issues that occur almost exclusively in girls and women. Novartis is one of the few big pharmaceutical companies which is doing extensive research into diseases of the brain. This is particularly important now as autism numbers are increasing and it is estimated that as many as 1 in 50 children is currently affected by this syndrome in one from or another. Novartis has made remarkable strides in their developments and Ricardo Dolmetsch, head of research, feels confident of major breakthroughs in the next few years. 
PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) has a spectrum of symptoms. Almost all of the girls affected by PCDH19 mutations exhibit seizures of many types, but the most typical characteristic of PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) is the tendency of the seizures to cluster and interfere with breathing (causing cyanotic spells). Some of the girls affected with PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) have cognitive delays, much of the research indicates that about two-thirds of the girls have Intellectual Delay (ID) ranging from mild to moderate. Additionally, about 40% of the girls with PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) are on the autism spectrum. Many of those with PCDH19 also exhibit behavioral and psychological problems including aggression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and, in some cases,
 TROY, NEW YORK, 5 MAY 2014: Hillary Savoie takes her daughter outside for a bubble blowing session at their home in Troy, New york. Esme' Savoie, 3, suffers from a rare genetic disease know as PCDH19, a genetically mutated orphan disease of the kind which Novartis's N.I.B.R division feels they can learn a great deal, Troy, NY, 5 May 2014. Esme's parents Hillary and Andre Savoie have become experts in Esme's syndrome and are involved in fundraising for continued research and are a study case for Boston Childrens hospital and Novartis. PCDH19 Female Limited Epilepsy has been diagnosed in approximately 200 girls and women worldwide. PCDH19 FLE have been associated with the occurrence of epilepsy, a spectrum of developmental delays, and behavioral issues that occur almost exclusively in girls and women. Novartis is one of the few big pharmaceutical companies which is doing extensive research into diseases of the brain. This is particularly important now as autism numbers are increasing and it is estimated that as many as 1 in 50 children is currently affected by this syndrome in one from or another. Novartis has made remarkable strides in their developments and Ricardo Dolmetsch, head of research, feels confident of major breakthroughs in the next few years. 
PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) has a spectrum of symptoms. Almost all of the girls affected by PCDH19 mutations exhibit seizures of many types, but the most typical characteristic of PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) is the tendency of the seizures to cluster and interfere with breathing (causing cyanotic spells). Some of the girls affected with PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) have cognitive delays, much of the research indicates that about two-thirds of the girls have Intellectual Delay (ID) ranging from mild to moderate. Additionally, about 40% of the girls with PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) are on the autism spectrum. Many of those with PCDH19 also exhibit behavioral and psychological problems including aggression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and, in some cases,
 TROY, NEW YORK, 5 MAY 2014: Esme' Savoie, 3, suffers from a rare genetic disease know as PCDH19, a genetically mutated orphan disease of the kind which Novartis's N.I.B.R division feels they can learn a great deal, Troy, NY, 5 May 2014. Esme' is seen interacting with her grandfather and step-granmother on their small holding in upstate NY. Esme's parents Hillary and Andre Savoie have become experts in Esme's syndrome and are involved in fundraising for continued research and are a study case for Boston Childrens hospital and Novartis. PCDH19 Female Limited Epilepsy has been diagnosed in approximately 200 girls and women worldwide. PCDH19 FLE have been associated with the occurrence of epilepsy, a spectrum of developmental delays, and behavioral issues that occur almost exclusively in girls and women. Novartis is one of the few big pharmaceutical companies which is doing extensive research into diseases of the brain. This is particularly important now as autism numbers are increasing and it is estimated that as many as 1 in 50 children is currently affected by this syndrome in one from or another. Novartis has made remarkable strides in their developments and Ricardo Dolmetsch, head of research, feels confident of major breakthroughs in the next few years. 
PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) has a spectrum of symptoms. Almost all of the girls affected by PCDH19 mutations exhibit seizures of many types, but the most typical characteristic of PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) is the tendency of the seizures to cluster and interfere with breathing (causing cyanotic spells). Some of the girls affected with PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) have cognitive delays, much of the research indicates that about two-thirds of the girls have Intellectual Delay (ID) ranging from mild to moderate. Additionally, about 40% of the girls with PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) are on the autism spectrum. Many of those with PCDH19 also exhibit behavioral and psychological problems including aggression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and, in some cases,
 TROY, NEW YORK, 5 MAY 2014: Esme' Savoie, 3, suffers from a rare genetic disease know as PCDH19, a genetically mutated orphan disease of the kind which Novartis's N.I.B.R division feels they can learn a great deal, Troy, NY, 5 May 2014. Esme' is seen with her granmother Mel and step grandfather Phil on their sheep farm in upstate NY. Esme's parents Hillary and Andre Savoie have become experts in Esme's syndrome and are involved in fundraising for continued research and are a study case for Boston Childrens hospital and Novartis. PCDH19 Female Limited Epilepsy has been diagnosed in approximately 200 girls and women worldwide. PCDH19 FLE have been associated with the occurrence of epilepsy, a spectrum of developmental delays, and behavioral issues that occur almost exclusively in girls and women. Novartis is one of the few big pharmaceutical companies which is doing extensive research into diseases of the brain. This is particularly important now as autism numbers are increasing and it is estimated that as many as 1 in 50 children is currently affected by this syndrome in one from or another. Novartis has made remarkable strides in their developments and Ricardo Dolmetsch, head of research, feels confident of major breakthroughs in the next few years. 
PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) has a spectrum of symptoms. Almost all of the girls affected by PCDH19 mutations exhibit seizures of many types, but the most typical characteristic of PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) is the tendency of the seizures to cluster and interfere with breathing (causing cyanotic spells). Some of the girls affected with PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) have cognitive delays, much of the research indicates that about two-thirds of the girls have Intellectual Delay (ID) ranging from mild to moderate. Additionally, about 40% of the girls with PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) are on the autism spectrum. Many of those with PCDH19 also exhibit behavioral and psychological problems including aggression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and, in some cases, schiz
 TROY, NEW YORK, 5 MAY 2014: Esme' Savoie, 3, suffers from a rare genetic disease know as PCDH19, a genetically mutated orphan disease of the kind which Novartis's N.I.B.R division feels they can learn a great deal, Troy, NY, 5 May 2014. Esme's is seen with her parents Hillary and Andre Savoie who have become experts in Esme's syndrome and are involved in fundraising for continued research and are a study case for Boston Childrens hospital and Novartis. PCDH19 Female Limited Epilepsy has been diagnosed in approximately 200 girls and women worldwide. PCDH19 FLE have been associated with the occurrence of epilepsy, a spectrum of developmental delays, and behavioral issues that occur almost exclusively in girls and women. Novartis is one of the few big pharmaceutical companies which is doing extensive research into diseases of the brain. This is particularly important now as autism numbers are increasing and it is estimated that as many as 1 in 50 children is currently affected by this syndrome in one from or another. Novartis has made remarkable strides in their developments and Ricardo Dolmetsch, head of research, feels confident of major breakthroughs in the next few years. 
PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) has a spectrum of symptoms. Almost all of the girls affected by PCDH19 mutations exhibit seizures of many types, but the most typical characteristic of PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) is the tendency of the seizures to cluster and interfere with breathing (causing cyanotic spells). Some of the girls affected with PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) have cognitive delays, much of the research indicates that about two-thirds of the girls have Intellectual Delay (ID) ranging from mild to moderate. Additionally, about 40% of the girls with PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) are on the autism spectrum. Many of those with PCDH19 also exhibit behavioral and psychological problems including aggression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and, in some cases, schizophrenia. PCDH19 FLE may also cause hypotonia/
PCDH19 refers to a gene located
 YAROSLAVL, RUSSIA, 15 MAY 2014: Nikolay Ivanovich Platonova, 82, and his wife Galina Vasilevna, 78, are both in the Novartis sponsored hypertension program at Yaroslavl Veterans Hospital in Russia. They have tried to remain healthy their whole lives but education and effective medication for healthy living and hypertension has been scarce in the region. Nikolay spent many years in the Soviet military and he continues to do his daily excercises from that period every day. Galina tries to feed them both healthy foods on a daily basis, with fruit when they can get it. They like to walk outside as part of their routine. Both Nikolay and Galina began seeing Dr Evgeniy Bybihin at the Yaroslavl Veterans Hospital as part of their treatment for hypertension. He has been instrumental in running a Novartis sponsored hypertension program for the hospital, this has seen patients admitted for up to three weeks for monitoring, education on hypertension and the use of correct medication. This program has seen a dramatic improvement in all of these areas in the Yaroslavl region as awareness of hypertension has improved not only amongst patients but also across the medical profession. Nikolay and Galina say that they now monitor their blood pressure on a regular basis and take their medication exactly as instructed. They feel better much better as a result and try to persuade their friends as to the benefits of a good education on the issue of hypertension. Novartis is involved in a number of initiatives across Russia. These include large scale facility buidling as well as partnerships with healthcare organisations and government. As part of the Yaroslavl healthcare systems improvement partnership project, Novartis is collaborating with the regional government of Yaroslavl in Russia, key clinicians and institutions to improve the diagnosis, screening and treatment of hypertension and reduce preventable death and disability from cardiovascular events. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage
 YAROSLAVL, RUSSIA, 15 MAY 2014: Nikolay Ivanovich Platonova, 82, and his wife Galina Vasilevna, 78, are both in the Novartis sponsored hypertension program at Yaroslavl Veterans Hospital in Russia. They have tried to remain healthy their whole lives but education and effective medication for healthy living and hypertension has been scarce in the region. Nikolay spent many years in the Soviet military and he continues to do his daily excercises from that period every day. Galina tries to feed them both healthy foods on a daily basis, with fruit when they can get it. They like to walk outside as part of their routine. Both Nikolay and Galina began seeing Dr Evgeniy Bybihin at the Yaroslavl Veterans Hospital as part of their treatment for hypertension. He has been instrumental in running a Novartis sponsored hypertension program for the hospital, this has seen patients admitted for up to three weeks for monitoring, education on hypertension and the use of correct medication. This program has seen a dramatic improvement in all of these areas in the Yaroslavl region as awareness of hypertension has improved not only amongst patients but also across the medical profession. Nikolay and Galina say that they now monitor their blood pressure on a regular basis and take their medication exactly as instructed. They feel better much better as a result and try to persuade their friends as to the benefits of a good education on the issue of hypertension. Novartis is involved in a number of initiatives across Russia. These include large scale facility buidling as well as partnerships with healthcare organisations and government. As part of the Yaroslavl healthcare systems improvement partnership project, Novartis is collaborating with the regional government of Yaroslavl in Russia, key clinicians and institutions to improve the diagnosis, screening and treatment of hypertension and reduce preventable death and disability from cardiovascular events. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage
 YAROSLAVL, RUSSIA, 14 MAY 2014: Scenes from a classroom of hypertension patients in the excercise studio at Yaroslavl Veterans Hospital, Russia. These classes preach proper excercise as one aspect of a regime to combat hypertension in Russia today. They are part of a Novartis sponsored program at the hospital designed to bring a greater awareness and education to hypertension issues in the region. Novartis is involved in a number of initiatives across Russia. These include large scale facility buidling as well as partnerships with healthcare organisations and government. As part of the Yaroslavl healthcare systems improvement partnership project, Novartis is collaborating with the regional government of Yaroslavl in Russia, key clinicians and institutions to improve the diagnosis, screening and treatment of hypertension and reduce preventable death and disability from cardiovascular events. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage for Novartis.)
 YAROSLAVL, RUSSIA, 15 MAY 2014: Nikolay Ivanovich Platonova, 82, and his wife Galina Vasilevna, 78, are both in the Novartis sponsored hypertension program at Yaroslavl Veterans Hospital in Russia. They have tried to remain healthy their whole lives but education and effective medication for healthy living and hypertension has been scarce in the region. Nikolay spent many years in the Soviet military and he continues to do his daily excercises from that period every day. Galina tries to feed them both healthy foods on a daily basis, with fruit when they can get it. They like to walk outside as part of their routine. Both Nikolay and Galina began seeing Dr Evgeniy Bybihin at the Yaroslavl Veterans Hospital as part of their treatment for hypertension. He has been instrumental in running a Novartis sponsored hypertension program for the hospital, this has seen patients admitted for up to three weeks for monitoring, education on hypertension and the use of correct medication. This program has seen a dramatic improvement in all of these areas in the Yaroslavl region as awareness of hypertension has improved not only amongst patients but also across the medical profession. Nikolay and Galina say that they now monitor their blood pressure on a regular basis and take their medication exactly as instructed. They feel better much better as a result and try to persuade their friends as to the benefits of a good education on the issue of hypertension. Novartis is involved in a number of initiatives across Russia. These include large scale facility buidling as well as partnerships with healthcare organisations and government. As part of the Yaroslavl healthcare systems improvement partnership project, Novartis is collaborating with the regional government of Yaroslavl in Russia, key clinicians and institutions to improve the diagnosis, screening and treatment of hypertension and reduce preventable death and disability from cardiovascular events. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage
 YAROSLAVL, RUSSIA, 15 MAY 2014: Nikolay Ivanovich Platonova, 82, and his wife Galina Vasilevna, 78, are both in the Novartis sponsored hypertension program at Yaroslavl Veterans Hospital in Russia. They have tried to remain healthy their whole lives but education and effective medication for healthy living and hypertension has been scarce in the region. Nikolay spent many years in the Soviet military and he continues to do his daily excercises from that period every day. Galina tries to feed them both healthy foods on a daily basis, with fruit when they can get it. They like to walk outside as part of their routine. Both Nikolay and Galina began seeing Dr Evgeniy Bybihin at the Yaroslavl Veterans Hospital as part of their treatment for hypertension. He has been instrumental in running a Novartis sponsored hypertension program for the hospital, this has seen patients admitted for up to three weeks for monitoring, education on hypertension and the use of correct medication. This program has seen a dramatic improvement in all of these areas in the Yaroslavl region as awareness of hypertension has improved not only amongst patients but also across the medical profession. Nikolay and Galina say that they now monitor their blood pressure on a regular basis and take their medication exactly as instructed. They feel better much better as a result and try to persuade their friends as to the benefits of a good education on the issue of hypertension. Novartis is involved in a number of initiatives across Russia. These include large scale facility buidling as well as partnerships with healthcare organisations and government. As part of the Yaroslavl healthcare systems improvement partnership project, Novartis is collaborating with the regional government of Yaroslavl in Russia, key clinicians and institutions to improve the diagnosis, screening and treatment of hypertension and reduce preventable death and disability from cardiovascular events. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage
 YAROSLAVL, RUSSIA, 15 MAY 2014: Tamara Ivanovna Yachmentseva, 77, had a heart attack five years ago. She has been a kindergarten teacher for the last 55 years, building a facility in her local area of Yaroslavl and caring for multiple generations of children for over half a century. Tamara has tried to be healthy her whole life but education on healthy living and hypertension has been scarce in her region. When she had a heart attack Tamara begain seeing Dr Evgeniy Bybihin at the Yaroslavl Veterans Hospital. He has been instrumental in running a Novartis sponsored hypertension program for the hospital, this has seen patients admitted for up to three weeks for monitoring, education on hypertension and the use of correct medication. This program has seen a dramatic improvement in all of these areas in the Yaroslavl region as awareness of hypertension has improved not only amongst patients but also across the medical profession. Tamara says this program has been invaluable to her: "If my heart keeps going, I can do anything." Novartis is involved in a number of initiatives across Russia. These include large scale facility buidling as well as partnerships with healthcare organisations and government. As part of the Yaroslavl healthcare systems improvement partnership project, Novartis is collaborating with the regional government of Yaroslavl in Russia, key clinicians and institutions to improve the diagnosis, screening and treatment of hypertension and reduce preventable death and disability from cardiovascular events. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage for Novartis.)
 YAROSLAVL, RUSSIA, 15 MAY 2014: Tamara Ivanovna Yachmentseva, 77, had a heart attack five years ago. She has been a kindergarten teacher for the last 55 years, building a facility in her local area of Yaroslavl and caring for multiple generations of children for over half a century. Tamara has tried to be healthy her whole life but education on healthy living and hypertension has been scarce in her region. When she had a heart attack Tamara begain seeing Dr Evgeniy Bybihin at the Yaroslavl Veterans Hospital. He has been instrumental in running a Novartis sponsored hypertension program for the hospital, this has seen patients admitted for up to three weeks for monitoring, education on hypertension and the use of correct medication. This program has seen a dramatic improvement in all of these areas in the Yaroslavl region as awareness of hypertension has improved not only amongst patients but also across the medical profession. Tamara says this program has been invaluable to her: "If my heart keeps going, I can do anything." Novartis is involved in a number of initiatives across Russia. These include large scale facility buidling as well as partnerships with healthcare organisations and government. As part of the Yaroslavl healthcare systems improvement partnership project, Novartis is collaborating with the regional government of Yaroslavl in Russia, key clinicians and institutions to improve the diagnosis, screening and treatment of hypertension and reduce preventable death and disability from cardiovascular events. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage for Novartis.)
 YAROSLAVL, RUSSIA, 15 MAY 2014: Tamara Ivanovna Yachmentseva, 77, had a heart attack five years ago. She has been a kindergarten teacher for the last 55 years, building a facility in her local area of Yaroslavl and caring for multiple generations of children for over half a century. Tamara has tried to be healthy her whole life but education on healthy living and hypertension has been scarce in her region. When she had a heart attack Tamara begain seeing Dr Evgeniy Bybihin at the Yaroslavl Veterans Hospital. He has been instrumental in running a Novartis sponsored hypertension program for the hospital, this has seen patients admitted for up to three weeks for monitoring, education on hypertension and the use of correct medication. This program has seen a dramatic improvement in all of these areas in the Yaroslavl region as awareness of hypertension has improved not only amongst patients but also across the medical profession. Tamara says this program has been invaluable to her: "If my heart keeps going, I can do anything." Novartis is involved in a number of initiatives across Russia. These include large scale facility buidling as well as partnerships with healthcare organisations and government. As part of the Yaroslavl healthcare systems improvement partnership project, Novartis is collaborating with the regional government of Yaroslavl in Russia, key clinicians and institutions to improve the diagnosis, screening and treatment of hypertension and reduce preventable death and disability from cardiovascular events. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage for Novartis.)
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 BRIGHTON, MICHIGAN, USA, 25 MAY 2014: Ryan Groves is 27 years old and lives in Brighton, Michigan, where he participates in the Special Olympics while living with Tuberous Sclerosis. He is a track and field athlete and has won many medals at the Special Olympics. Some of Ryan’s resulting disorders associated with TSC include renal angiomyolipomas and mild autism. Ryan lives at home with his parents, Kathy and Bob, and has two older brothers as well as two pet dogs that he spends a great deal of time with. Ryan also works at a local supermarket chain called Krogers where he collects shopping trolleys and cleans the aisles. Ryan has benefitted from Afinitor, a drug made by Novartis which causes a significant reduction in tumors. This benefit for Ryan is actually a side bar discovery and not the original intent of the drug. It is an example of how research and development in the pharm world can lead to unexpected and beneficial discoveries. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage for Novartis.)
 BRIGHTON, MICHIGAN, USA, 25 MAY 2014: Ryan Groves is 27 years old and lives in Brighton, Michigan, where he participates in the Special Olympics while living with Tuberous Sclerosis. He is a track and field athlete and has won many medals at the Special Olympics. Some of Ryan’s resulting disorders associated with TSC include renal angiomyolipomas and mild autism. Ryan lives at home with his parents, Kathy and Bob, and has two older brothers as well as two pet dogs that he spends a great deal of time with. Ryan also works at a local supermarket chain called Krogers where he collects shopping trolleys and cleans the aisles. Ryan has benefitted from Afinitor, a drug made by Novartis which causes a significant reduction in tumors. This benefit for Ryan is actually a side bar discovery and not the original intent of the drug. It is an example of how research and development in the pharm world can lead to unexpected and beneficial discoveries. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage for Novartis.)
 LEBANON, TENNESSEE, USA, 30 MAY 2014: Whitney Lackey is a 17-year-old athlete living in Lebanon, Tennessee who participates in the Special Olympics while managing Tuberous Sclerosis. Whitney experiences renal angiomyolipomas, angiofibromas and cognitive delays associated with her TSC diagnosis. Whitney is an only child and lives at home with her parents, Sharon and Brent Lackey. Whitney has had multiple tumors all over her body since she was a baby and also suffers from seizures. Novartis makes a drug called Afinitor which was developed as a cancer medication. It has the unexpected effect of shrinking tumors in people with Tuberous Sclerosis. This underlines the importance of ongoing research and development for big Pharma, something Novartis does more of than any other pharmaceutical company. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage for Novartis.)
 LEBANON, TENNESSEE, USA, 30 MAY 2014: Whitney Lackey is a 17-year-old athlete living in Lebanon, Tennessee who participates in the Special Olympics while managing Tuberous Sclerosis. Whitney experiences renal angiomyolipomas, angiofibromas and cognitive delays associated with her TSC diagnosis. Whitney is an only child and lives at home with her parents, Sharon and Brent Lackey. Whitney has had multiple tumors all over her body since she was a baby and also suffers from seizures. Novartis makes a drug called Afinitor which was developed as a cancer medication. It has the unexpected effect of shrinking tumors in people with Tuberous Sclerosis. This underlines the importance of ongoing research and development for big Pharma, something Novartis does more of than any other pharmaceutical company. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage for Novartis.)
 LEBANON, TENNESSEE, USA, 30 MAY 2014: Whitney Lackey is a 17-year-old athlete living in Lebanon, Tennessee who participates in the Special Olympics while managing Tuberous Sclerosis. Whitney experiences renal angiomyolipomas, angiofibromas and cognitive delays associated with her TSC diagnosis. Whitney is an only child and lives at home with her parents, Sharon and Brent Lackey. Whitney has had multiple tumors all over her body since she was a baby and also suffers from seizures. Novartis makes a drug called Afinitor which was developed as a cancer medication. It has the unexpected effect of shrinking tumors in people with Tuberous Sclerosis. This underlines the importance of ongoing research and development for big Pharma, something Novartis does more of than any other pharmaceutical company. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage for Novartis.)
 MU CANG CHAI, YEN BAI, VIETNAM, 6 JUNE 2015: Dr Chang As Sinh, 37, waits for patients at the community hospital in the hills over Mu Cang Chai. Sinh has worked in this community for over 10 years and is the only doctor in the community. He speaks the local Hmong dialect and is instrumental in medical care delivery to this remote ethnic minority. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis)
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 MU CANG CHAI, YEN BAI, VIETNAM, 5 JUNE 2015: Giang Giua Cua, 77, suffers from Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Obstruction, COPD, a common affliction amongst this community. Fires are burnt inside the home for both warmth and cooking, thereby causing potential respitory issues. Cua is visited at home by community doctor Chang As Sinh, 37. Sinh has worked in this community for over 10 years and is the only doctor in the community. (Photo by Brent Stirton/ Novartis)
 MU CANG CHAI, YEN BAI, VIETNAM, 6 JUNE 2015: A volunteer doctor for the Novartis Cung Song Khoe program for Vietnam visits a very sick man who is suffering from kidney failure. The doctor monitors his condition and tries to help manage his deteriorating health. Poverty is very debilitating in these circumstances, with dialysis necessary, transport to the nearest canditate city, rent and food while there, the treatment itself, are all beyond this man's family and it is likely he will die. Doctors in the community are vital as cases like this can be seen earlier and help secured before it is too late. The Cung Song Khoe program is all about medical education, from what is happening with the body to how to deal with problems and what the correct medical procedure is to follow. (Photo by Brent Stirton/ Novartis.)
 MU CANG CHAI, YEN BAI, VIETNAM, 5 JUNE 2015: Dr Chang As Sinh, 37, seen making his way to a house call in Mu Cang Chai. Sinh has worked in this community for over 10 years and is the only doctor in the community. He speaks the local Hmong dialect and is instrumental in medical care delivery to this remote ethnic minority. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis)
 MU CANG CHAI, YEN BAI, VIETNAM, 5 JUNE 2015: Dr Chang As Sinh, 37, has worked in this community for over 10 years and is the only doctor in the community. He speaks the local Hmong dialect and is instrumental in medical care delivery to this remote ethnic minority. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis)
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 MU CANG CHAI, YEN BAI, VIETNAM, 6 JUNE 2015: Dr Chang As Sinh, 37, updates his records in his office in the community hospital in the hills over Mu Cang Chai. Sinh has worked in this community for over 10 years and is the only doctor in the community. He speaks the local Hmong dialect and is instrumental in medical care delivery to this remote ethnic minority. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis)
 MU CANG CHAI, YEN BAI, VIETNAM, 6 JUNE 2015: Local Hmong women pose for pictures after coming up from working in the rice paddies below. The beautiful shapes of the rice paddies is something that Mu Cang Chai is famous for. Rice is the staple crop in a community where people earn on average less than one dollar a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis)
 MU CANG CHAI, YEN BAI, VIETNAM, 5 JUNE 2015:  local people prepare the rice paddies Mu Cang Chai is famous for. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis)
 MU CANG CHAI, VIETNAM, 7 JUNE 2015: The Director of Mu Cang Chai Preventative Health Centre, Dr Cu Ahong, does his rounds to visit with his many patients. His district is 90% ethnic Hmong people and his small hospital deals with many ailments that his communal clinics and healthworkers refer. He is seen here with a young couple with their first child, a caesarian birth he delivered. (photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis.)
 MU CANG CHAI, VIETNAM, 7 JUNE 2015: The Director of Mu Cang Chai Preventative Health Centre, Dr Cu Ahong, does his rounds to visit with his many patients. His district is 90% ethnic Hmong people and his small hospital deals with many ailments that his communal clinics and healthworkers refer. He is seen here with a premature baby he delivered and the mother. (photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis.)
 MU CANG CHAI, VIETNAM, 7 JUNE 2015: The Director of Mu Cang Chai Preventative Health Centre, Dr Cu Ahong, does his rounds to visit with his many patients. His district is 90% ethnic Hmong people and his small hospital deals with many ailments that his communal clinics and healthworkers refer. He is seen here with a young Hmong girl who has severe abdominal pain. Mu Thi Cha is her name and she is 8 years old. (photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis.)
 MU CANG CHAI, VIETNAM, 7 JUNE 2015: The Director of Mu Cang Chai Preventative Health Centre, Dr Cu Ahong, does his rounds to visit with his many patients. His district is 90% ethnic Hmong people and his small hospital deals with many ailments that his communal clinics and health-workers refer. He is seen in his emergency room with a Hmong woman Lu Thi Bau who has a bacterial infection which has resulted in septicemia. He is monitoring her with antibiotics for now, (photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis.)
 HANOI, VIETNAM, 9 JUNE 2015: Tradional healthcare stores in the old quarter of Hanoi, Vietnam. Medical treatments are changing in Vietnam but with an ancient tradtional medicine system in place that will take time. The pharmaceutical industry in Vietnam is growing at a rapid 17% per annum but much of that is with unregulated medicines which are expensive for a population where many still struggle with poverty. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis)
 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SEPTEMBER 2015: Dr Amy Rothberg seen at home in Ann Arbor, Michigan. Dr Rothberg is one of the foremost medical authorities on the science of obesity medicine in America. She runs the weight management program for the University of Michigan Health system. Amy E. Rothberg, MD, PhD, is Assistant Professor of Internal Medicine in the Division of Metabolism, Endocrinology and Diabetes and Director of the Weight Management Clinic. She specializes in the treatment of overweight and obesity, diabetes, and related metabolic diseases. Dr. Rothberg is one of the first in the nation to receive certification in obesity medicine from the American Board of Obesity Medicine.This is an advanced weight loss program that accepts referrals from within the University of Michigan’s Health system and from community physicians. It embraces the notion of long term weight management for obese individuals. The weight management program provides intense educational, dietary, physical, behavioral and pharmacological interventions. The University of Michigan weight management program offers a 2 year intervention. There are 11 visits to a physician and 26 visits with a registered dietician during these 2 years. The first 3 to 6 months involve an intense dietary induction phase. At their first appointment all patients are asked to sign a contract agreeing to attend greater than 80% of their scheduled appointments with the physician and dietician during the initial 2 year period. At the first visit a comprehensive health and weight history is compiled. Anti-diabetic therapy is adjusted at this first visit to optimize glycemic control and to promote weight loss. Weight loss is then initiated by employing a very low calorie diet (800 kcal/day) The rationale is that meal replacement limits food choices and divorces patients from unhealthy consumptive behavior. Patients keep daily diaries of these behaviors. These are then reviewed with the dietician on a weekly basis. Patients
 MICHIGAN, SEPTEMBER 2015: Jacob Jensen, 25, is an engineer who lives near Farmingtion, Michigan. He is a successful member of the University of Michigan's weight management program. Jacob has lost 57 pounds in the 9 months he has been in the program so far. He is seen speaking in consultation with Dr Amy Rothberg as well as Christine Fowler, his dietician in the program. Jacob now runs regularly and has recently done a triathlon. His number is 7169821626. This is an advanced weight loss program that accepts referrals from within the University of Michigan’s Health system and from community physicians. It embraces the notion of long term weight management for obese individuals. The weight management program provides intense educational, dietary, physical, behavioral and pharmacological interventions. The University of Michigan weight management program offers a 2 year intervention. There are 11 visits to a physician and 26 visits with a registered dietician during these 2 years. The first 3 to 6 months involve an intense dietary induction phase. At their first appointment all patients are asked to sign a contract agreeing to attend greater than 80% of their scheduled appointments with the physician and dietician during the initial 2 year period. At the first visit a comprehensive health and weight history is compiled. Anti-diabetic therapy is adjusted at this first visit to optimize glycemic control and to promote weight loss. Weight loss is then initiated by employing a very low calorie diet (800 kcal/day) The rationale is that meal replacement limits food choices and divorces patients from unhealthy consumptive behavior. Patients keep daily diaries of these behaviors. These are then reviewed with the dietician on a weekly basis. Patients are then asked to increase their physical activity to 40 minutes per day. 3 to 6 months after this a weight loss of 15% is the average achievement. Regular foods are then reintroduced and the intervention begins to focus on behav
 MICHIGAN, SEPTEMBER 2015: Jacob Jensen, 25, is an engineer who lives near Farmingtion, Michigan. He is a successful member of the University of Michigan's weight management program. Jacob has lost 57 pounds in the 9 months he has been in the program so far. He is seen speaking in consultation with Dr Amy Rothberg as well as Christine Fowler, his dietician in the program. Jacob now runs regularly and has recently done a triathlon. His number is 7169821626. This is an advanced weight loss program that accepts referrals from within the University of Michigan’s Health system and from community physicians. It embraces the notion of long term weight management for obese individuals. The weight management program provides intense educational, dietary, physical, behavioral and pharmacological interventions. The University of Michigan weight management program offers a 2 year intervention. There are 11 visits to a physician and 26 visits with a registered dietician during these 2 years. The first 3 to 6 months involve an intense dietary induction phase. At their first appointment all patients are asked to sign a contract agreeing to attend greater than 80% of their scheduled appointments with the physician and dietician during the initial 2 year period. At the first visit a comprehensive health and weight history is compiled. Anti-diabetic therapy is adjusted at this first visit to optimize glycemic control and to promote weight loss. Weight loss is then initiated by employing a very low calorie diet (800 kcal/day) The rationale is that meal replacement limits food choices and divorces patients from unhealthy consumptive behavior. Patients keep daily diaries of these behaviors. These are then reviewed with the dietician on a weekly basis. Patients are then asked to increase their physical activity to 40 minutes per day. 3 to 6 months after this a weight loss of 15% is the average achievement. Regular foods are then reintroduced and the intervention begins to focus on behav
 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SEPTEMBER 2015: David Thomas has been a part of the University of Michigan’s Weight management program for 4 years. This is the second round for David as he did not achieve the goals he needed the first time. He is seen at the University of Michigan Exercise therapy lab with Exercise physiologists Heidi Reger and Ann Brennan. This is where he is monitored for body mass index, lung capacity and a specific exercise program is developed for his needs. David is diabetic and uses Insulin daily, other people on this program have been able to give up Insulin due to weight management successes. David would hope to do the same. He sticks to a prescribed diet and exercises regularly, utilizing gym in his home in Ann Arbor. David works in the motor industry in Detroit and has done so for many years.  His contact numbers are as follows: 1 2488729001, 12483350309, 12482445786. His email is dthomas@comcast.netThis is an advanced weight loss program that accepts referrals from within the University of Michigan’s Health system and from community physicians. It embraces the notion of long term weight management for obese individuals. The weight management program provides intense educational, dietary, physical, behavioral and pharmacological interventions. The University of Michigan weight management program offers a 2 year intervention. There are 11 visits to a physician and 26 visits with a registered dietician during these 2 years. The first 3 to 6 months involve an intense dietary induction phase. At their first appointment all patients are asked to sign a contract agreeing to attend greater than 80% of their scheduled appointments with the physician and dietician during the initial 2 year period. At the first visit a comprehensive health and weight history is compiled. Anti-diabetic therapy is adjusted at this first visit to optimize glycemic control and to promote weight loss. Weight loss is then initiated by employing a very low calorie diet (800 kcal
 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SEPTEMBER 2015: David Thomas has been a part of the University of Michigan’s Weight management program for 4 years. This is the second round for David as he did not achieve the goals he needed the first time. He is seen at the University of Michigan Exercise therapy lab with Exercise physiologists Heidi Reger and Ann Brennan. This is where he is monitored for body mass index, lung capacity and a specific exercise program is developed for his needs. David is diabetic and uses Insulin daily, other people on this program have been able to give up Insulin due to weight management successes. David would hope to do the same. He sticks to a prescribed diet and exercises regularly, utilizing gym in his home in Ann Arbor. David works in the motor industry in Detroit and has done so for many years.  His contact numbers are as follows: 1 2488729001, 12483350309, 12482445786. His email is dthomas@comcast.netThis is an advanced weight loss program that accepts referrals from within the University of Michigan’s Health system and from community physicians. It embraces the notion of long term weight management for obese individuals. The weight management program provides intense educational, dietary, physical, behavioral and pharmacological interventions. The University of Michigan weight management program offers a 2 year intervention. There are 11 visits to a physician and 26 visits with a registered dietician during these 2 years. The first 3 to 6 months involve an intense dietary induction phase. At their first appointment all patients are asked to sign a contract agreeing to attend greater than 80% of their scheduled appointments with the physician and dietician during the initial 2 year period. At the first visit a comprehensive health and weight history is compiled. Anti-diabetic therapy is adjusted at this first visit to optimize glycemic control and to promote weight loss. Weight loss is then initiated by employing a very low calorie diet (800 kcal
 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SEPTEMBER 2015: David Thomas has been a part of the University of Michigan’s Weight management program for 4 years. This is the second round for David as he did not achieve the goals he needed the first time. He is seen at the University of Michigan Exercise therapy lab where he is monitored by exercise physiologist Heidi Reger for body mass index, lung capacity and a specific exercise program is developed for his needs. David is diabetic and uses Insulin daily, other people on this program have been able to give up Insulin due to weight management successes. David would hope to do the same. He sticks to a prescribed diet and exercises regularly, utilizing gym in his home in Ann Arbor. David works in the motor industry in Detroit and has done so for many years.  His contact numbers are as follows: 1 2488729001, 12483350309, 12482445786. His email is dthomas@comcast.netThis is an advanced weight loss program that accepts referrals from within the University of Michigan’s Health system and from community physicians. It embraces the notion of long term weight management for obese individuals. The weight management program provides intense educational, dietary, physical, behavioral and pharmacological interventions. The University of Michigan weight management program offers a 2 year intervention. There are 11 visits to a physician and 26 visits with a registered dietician during these 2 years. The first 3 to 6 months involve an intense dietary induction phase. At their first appointment all patients are asked to sign a contract agreeing to attend greater than 80% of their scheduled appointments with the physician and dietician during the initial 2 year period. At the first visit a comprehensive health and weight history is compiled. Anti-diabetic therapy is adjusted at this first visit to optimize glycemic control and to promote weight loss. Weight loss is then initiated by employing a very low calorie diet (800 kcal/day) The rationale is that

KISUMU, KENYA, 21 JUNE 2015: Shelvine Achreng is sick with Leukemia and Sickle Cell disease. Her parents are impoverished farm labourers who cannot afford transport to the appropriate hospital, let alone the costs of treating Shelvine's condition. Victims of this kind of disease amongst Africa's poor are destined to die without outside intervention. Non-Communicable diseases like Cancer, Hypertension and Diabetes are on the rise in Africa, adding to the strain the more traditional diseases already place on populations. Poverty only serves to increase fatalities amongst the poorest of these. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis)

DHAKA CITY, BANGLADESH, AUGUST 2015: A child suffering from acute Childhood Pneumonia is given respitary tests, temperature readings and wieighed at the local Kamalapur clinic. From there the child has blood taken for a test and then is sent to the main hospital once diagnosed with acute Pneumonia. ICDDR,B is an independent, non-profit health research institute dedicated to improving the lives of people living in poverty in Bangladesh and globally. They specialize in child and adolescent health with a focus on diarrheal diseases, cholera as well as childhood pneumonia. Their urban site at Kamalapur was founded to monitor pneumonia in children through fieldworkers who are in the field every day. There are 60 field staff, 18 medical teams, and 3 researchers. These field teams are made up entirely of women as they are dealing with mothers most of the time. These field teams conduct daily surveys that relate to fever, labored breathing, lethargy, and inability to drink water, convulsions and headaches. Each fieldworker will see at least 23 patients every day, 6 days a week. If necessary, the child is then brought to the Kamalapur clinic where they are given blood tests, nebulized and given Amoxicillin if the need exists. In severe cases they are taken to the main ICDDR hospital in Dhaka. In most cases, local rickshaws will be used for transport; this is the most common means of transport in Dhaka. When a fieldworker visits a home, she will check the temperature of the child as well as the respiratory rate. She will then ask the mother a number of questions on the child’s health. This all goes to form a large database that has come to represent the country as a whole. Pneumonia remains one of the biggest killers of children under 5 around the world today. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis.)

DHAKA CITY, BANGLADESH, AUGUST 2015: An ICDDR,B healthcare workers deals with a mother who's child is suffering from severe childhood Pneumonia. A decision is made to get the child to the Kamalapur clinic for testing asap, then the child is taken to the main ICDDR,B hospital in Dhaka city. THe main mode of transport for this is the rickshaw. ICDDR,B is an independent, non-profit health research institute dedicated to improving the lives of people living in poverty in Bangladesh and globally. They specialize in child and adolescent health with a focus on diarrheal diseases, cholera as well as childhood pneumonia. Their urban site at Kamalapur was founded to monitor pneumonia in children through fieldworkers who are in the field every day. There are 60 field staff, 18 medical teams, and 3 researchers. These field teams are made up entirely of women as they are dealing with mothers most of the time. These field teams conduct daily surveys that relate to fever, labored breathing, lethargy, and inability to drink water, convulsions and headaches. Each fieldworker will see at least 23 patients every day, 6 days a week. If necessary, the child is then brought to the Kamalapur clinic where they are given blood tests, nebulized and given Amoxicillin if the need exists. In severe cases they are taken to the main ICDDR hospital in Dhaka. In most cases, local rickshaws will be used for transport; this is the most common means of transport in Dhaka. When a fieldworker visits a home, she will check the temperature of the child as well as the respiratory rate. She will then ask the mother a number of questions on the child’s health. This all goes to form a large database that has come to represent the country as a whole. Pneumonia remains one of the biggest killers of children under 5 around the world today. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis.)

DHAKA CITY, BANGLADESH, AUGUST 2015: Local men bathe riverside after a long day transporting goods at the local vegetable market. ICDDR,B is an independent, non-profit health research institute dedicated to improving the lives of people living in poverty in Bangladesh and globally. They specialize in child and adolescent health with a focus on diarrheal diseases, cholera as well as childhood pneumonia. Their urban site at Kamalapur was founded to monitor pneumonia in children through fieldworkers who are in the field every day. There are 60 field staff, 18 medical teams, and 3 researchers. These field teams are made up entirely of women as they are dealing with mothers most of the time. These field teams conduct daily surveys that relate to fever, labored breathing, lethargy, and inability to drink water, convulsions and headaches. Each fieldworker will see at least 23 patients every day, 6 days a week. If necessary, the child is then brought to the Kamalapur clinic where they are given blood tests, nebulized and given Amoxicillin if the need exists. In severe cases they are taken to the main ICDDR hospital in Dhaka. In most cases, local rickshaws will be used for transport; this is the most common means of transport in Dhaka. When a fieldworker visits a home, she will check the temperature of the child as well as the respiratory rate. She will then ask the mother a number of questions on the child’s health. This all goes to form a large database that has come to represent the country as a whole. Pneumonia remains one of the biggest killers of children under 5 around the world today. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis.)

DHAKA CITY, BANGLADESH, AUGUST 2015: Healthcare workers survey mothers about their children in the Kamalapur district. ICDDR,B is an independent, non-profit health research institute dedicated to improving the lives of people living in poverty in Bangladesh and globally. They specialize in child and adolescent health with a focus on diarrheal diseases, cholera as well as childhood pneumonia. Their urban site at Kamalapur was founded to monitor pneumonia in children through fieldworkers who are in the field every day. There are 60 field staff, 18 medical teams, and 3 researchers. These field teams are made up entirely of women as they are dealing with mothers most of the time. These field teams conduct daily surveys that relate to fever, labored breathing, lethargy, and inability to drink water, convulsions and headaches. Each fieldworker will see at least 23 patients every day, 6 days a week. If necessary, the child is then brought to the Kamalapur clinic where they are given blood tests, nebulized and given Amoxicillin if the need exists. In severe cases they are taken to the main ICDDR hospital in Dhaka. In most cases, local rickshaws will be used for transport; this is the most common means of transport in Dhaka. When a fieldworker visits a home, she will check the temperature of the child as well as the respiratory rate. She will then ask the mother a number of questions on the child’s health. This all goes to form a large database that has come to represent the country as a whole. Pneumonia remains one of the biggest killers of children under 5 around the world today. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis.)

DHAKA CITY, BANGLADESH, AUGUST 2015:Two mothers who's children are both suffering from Pneumonia wait to receive treatment for their children at the Kamalapur ICDDR,B clinic. ICDDR,B is an independent, non-profit health research institute dedicated to improving the lives of people living in poverty in Bangladesh and globally. They specialize in child and adolescent health with a focus on diarrheal diseases, cholera as well as childhood pneumonia. Their urban site at Kamalapur was founded to monitor pneumonia in children through fieldworkers who are in the field every day. There are 60 field staff, 18 medical teams, and 3 researchers. These field teams are made up entirely of women as they are dealing with mothers most of the time. These field teams conduct daily surveys that relate to fever, labored breathing, lethargy, and inability to drink water, convulsions and headaches. Each fieldworker will see at least 23 patients every day, 6 days a week. If necessary, the child is then brought to the Kamalapur clinic where they are given blood tests, nebulized and given Amoxicillin if the need exists. In severe cases they are taken to the main ICDDR hospital in Dhaka. In most cases, local rickshaws will be used for transport; this is the most common means of transport in Dhaka. When a fieldworker visits a home, she will check the temperature of the child as well as the respiratory rate. She will then ask the mother a number of questions on the child’s health. This all goes to form a large database that has come to represent the country as a whole. Pneumonia remains one of the biggest killers of children under 5 around the world today. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis.)

DHAKA CITY, BANGLADESH, AUGUST 2015: A ICDDR,B healthcare workers deals with a mother who's child is suffering from severe childhood Pneumonia. ICDDR,B is an independent, non-profit health research institute dedicated to improving the lives of people living in poverty in Bangladesh and globally. They specialize in child and adolescent health with a focus on diarrheal diseases, cholera as well as childhood pneumonia. Their urban site at Kamalapur was founded to monitor pneumonia in children through fieldworkers who are in the field every day. There are 60 field staff, 18 medical teams, and 3 researchers. These field teams are made up entirely of women as they are dealing with mothers most of the time. These field teams conduct daily surveys that relate to fever, labored breathing, lethargy, and inability to drink water, convulsions and headaches. Each fieldworker will see at least 23 patients every day, 6 days a week. If necessary, the child is then brought to the Kamalapur clinic where they are given blood tests, nebulized and given Amoxicillin if the need exists. In severe cases they are taken to the main ICDDR hospital in Dhaka. In most cases, local rickshaws will be used for transport; this is the most common means of transport in Dhaka. When a fieldworker visits a home, she will check the temperature of the child as well as the respiratory rate. She will then ask the mother a number of questions on the child’s health. This all goes to form a large database that has come to represent the country as a whole. Pneumonia remains one of the biggest killers of children under 5 around the world today. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis.)

SAO PAOLO, BRAZIL, 26 AUGUST 2014: Maria Lucia Martins Moreira, 68, has her stage 3 cataracts operated on at the prestigious Rue Domingos Arevelo Opthamology center in Sao Paolo, Brazil. Maria Lucia was operated on by Laser utilizing Alcon equipment and medication by renowned eye surgeon Dr Walton Nose'. She was included in this program because Dr Nose' is also a professor and as part of his university's outreach program to the economically challenged she was able to have her cataracts removed. The surgery took no longer than fifteen minutes per eye and Maria Lucia went home to a poorer suburb of Sao Paolo, Brazil where she was able to play with her grandchildren immediately. Maria Lucia is a devout woman who is a former School Canteen worker. She could no longer read her bible before the operation, she could not sew and she could not interact properly with her grandchildren or catch the bus without help seeing directions and place names. Maria Lucia is from a lower income family yet due to the efforts of Alcon, she has now undergone cataract surgery and is expected to make a good recovery of her sight. She is looking forward to seeing her grandchildren again more than anything. She is looking forward to rejoining her bible study class and no longer falling down the stairs. She has been very worried about her children having to take care of her. This cataract surgery will in effect free not just Maria Lucia but her whole family from the problem of cataract blindness. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage by Getty Images for Novartis.)

SAO PAOLO, BRAZIL, 26 AUGUST 2014: Maria Lucia Martins Moreira, 68, has her stage 3 cataracts operated on at the prestigious Rue Domingos Arevelo Opthamology center in Sao Paolo, Brazil. Maria Lucia was operated on by Laser utilizing Alcon equipment and medication by renowned eye surgeon Dr Walton Nose'. She was included in this program because Dr Nose' is also a professor and as part of his university's outreach program to the economically challenged she was able to have her cataracts removed. The surgery took no longer than fifteen minutes per eye and Maria Lucia went home to a poorer suburb of Sao Paolo, Brazil where she was able to play with her grandchildren immediately. Maria Lucia is a devout woman who is a former School Canteen worker. She could no longer read her bible before the operation, she could not sew and she could not interact properly with her grandchildren or catch the bus without help seeing directions and place names. Maria Lucia is from a lower income family yet due to the efforts of Alcon, she has now undergone cataract surgery and is expected to make a good recovery of her sight. She is looking forward to seeing her grandchildren again more than anything. She is looking forward to rejoining her bible study class and no longer falling down the stairs. She has been very worried about her children having to take care of her. This cataract surgery will in effect free not just Maria Lucia but her whole family from the problem of cataract blindness. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage by Getty Images for Novartis.)

SAO PAOLO, BRAZIL, 26 AUGUST 2014: Maria Lucia Martins Moreira, 68, in a rare quiet moment at home shortly after she had her stage 3 cataracts removed at the Rue Domingos Arevelo Opthamology center in Sao Paolo, Brazil. Maria Lucia was operated on by Laser utilizing Alcon equipment and medication. The surgery took no longer than fifteen minutes and Maria Lucia went home to a poorer suburb of Brzzil where she was able to play with her grandchildren immediately. Maria Lucia is a devout woman who is a former School Canteen worker. She could no longer read her bible before the operation, she could not sew and she could not interact properly with her grandchildren or catch the bus without help seeing directions and place names. Maria Lucia is from a lower income family yet due to the efforts of Alcon, she has now undergone cataract surgery and is expected to make a good recovery of her sight. She is looking forward to seeing her grandchildren again more than anything. She is looking forward to rejoining her bible study class and no longer falling down the stairs. She has been very worried about her children having to take care of her. This cataract surgery will in effect free not just Maria Lucia but her whole family from the problem of cataract blindness. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage by Getty Images for Novartis.)

SAO PAOLO, BRAZIL, 26 AUGUST 2014: Maria Lucia Martins Moreira, 68, feels out her new eyes by catching up on her sewing shortly after she had her stage 3 cataracts removed at the Rue Domingos Arevelo Opthamology center in Sao Paolo, Brazil. Maria Lucia was operated on by Laser utilizing Alcon equipment and medication. The surgery took no longer than fifteen minutes and Maria Lucia went home to a poorer suburb of Sao Paolo where she was able to play with her grandchildren immediately. Maria Lucia is a devout woman who is a former School Canteen worker. She could no longer read her bible before the operation, she could not sew and she could not interact properly with her grandchildren or catch the bus without help seeing directions and place names. Maria Lucia is from a lower income family yet due to the efforts of Alcon, she has now undergone cataract surgery and is expected to make a good recovery of her sight. She is looking forward to seeing her grandchildren again more than anything. She is looking forward to rejoining her bible study class and no longer falling down the stairs. She has been very worried about her children having to take care of her. This cataract surgery will in effect free not just Maria Lucia but her whole family from the problem of cataract blindness. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage by Getty Images for Novartis.)

CARCABUEY, ANDALUCIA, SPAIN, 11 JULY 2014: Fernando Sanchez, 84, is a longtime resident of the Andalucía village of Carcabuey in Spain along with his wife Emilia, 82. Fernando is a man who has been living with type 2 diabetes for over 30 years. As Fernando gets older, he is more careful with his diet and tries to exercise on a regular basis as well as cut back on his sugar intake. Recently Fernando was chosen to star in a short film on diabetes as part of a Novartis sponsored short film awareness campaign for Spain. Fernando is seen rejecting sugar and instead turning to dance with his onscreen partner Filomena Zamit, 86, herself a diabetes patient. They are the “sugar” in each other’s onscreen lives. Fernando has achieved some fame in the village as a result of the film and now dances as often as he is able. During this shoot he is seen in his home with his devout wife Emilia, 82, he is seen socializing and playing dominos with his friends and he is seen dancing with his dance partner Filomena on the streets of Carcabuey. He also meets up with a group of young ladies learning the Flamenco. Fernando cannot resist taking part and even takes Filomena along to a Flamenco rehearsal. Fernando has embraced a healthier lifestyle combined with the correction medication to combat his diabetes and live a longer, healthier lifestyle. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage for Novartis.)

CARCABUEY, ANDALUCIA, SPAIN, 11 JULY 2014: Fernando Sanchez, 84, is a longtime resident of the Andalucía village of Carcabuey in Spain along with his wife Emilia, 82. Fernando is a man who has been living with type 2 diabetes for over 30 years. As Fernando gets older, he is more careful with his diet and tries to exercise on a regular basis as well as cut back on his sugar intake. Recently Fernando was chosen to star in a short film on diabetes as part of a Novartis sponsored short film awareness campaign for Spain. Fernando is seen rejecting sugar and instead turning to dance with his onscreen partner Filomena Zamit, 86, herself a diabetes patient. They are the “sugar” in each other’s onscreen lives. Fernando has achieved some fame in the village as a result of the film and now dances as often as he is able. During this shoot he is seen in his home with his devout wife Emilia, 82, he is seen socializing and playing dominos with his friends and he is seen dancing with his dance partner Filomena on the streets of Carcabuey. He also meets up with a group of young ladies learning the Flamenco. Fernando cannot resist taking part and even takes Filomena along to a Flamenco rehearsal. Fernando has embraced a healthier lifestyle combined with the correction medication to combat his diabetes and live a longer, healthier lifestyle. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage for Novartis.)

CARCABUEY, ANDALUCIA, SPAIN, 11 JULY 2014: Fernando Sanchez, 84, is a longtime resident of the Andalucía village of Carcabuey in Spain along with his wife Emilia, 82. Fernando is a man who has been living with type 2 diabetes for over 30 years. As Fernando gets older, he is more careful with his diet and tries to exercise on a regular basis as well as cut back on his sugar intake. Recently Fernando was chosen to star in a short film on diabetes as part of a Novartis sponsored short film awareness campaign for Spain. Fernando is seen rejecting sugar and instead turning to dance with his onscreen partner Filomena Zamit, 86, herself a diabetes patient. They are the “sugar” in each other’s onscreen lives. Fernando has achieved some fame in the village as a result of the film and now dances as often as he is able. During this shoot he is seen in his home with his devout wife Emilia, 82, he is seen socializing and playing dominos with his friends and he is seen dancing with his dance partner Filomena on the streets of Carcabuey. He also meets up with a group of young ladies learning the Flamenco. Fernando cannot resist taking part and even takes Filomena along to a Flamenco rehearsal. Fernando has embraced a healthier lifestyle combined with the correction medication to combat his diabetes and live a longer, healthier lifestyle. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage for Novartis.)

PATNA, INDIA, 10 SEPTEMBER 2014: Elderly women with cataract blindness arrive by boat at a blindness camp along the river near Patna, India. India is estimated to have over 10 million blind people, most of whom suffer from cureable cataracts. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis)

PATNA, INDIA, 10 SEPTEMBER 2014: A group of women with eye problems crowd in to see an opthamolagist at a blindness camp along the river near Patna, India. India is estimated to have over 10 million blind people, most of whom suffer from cureable cataracts. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis)

SILIGURI, DARJEELING DISTRICT, INDIA, JULY 22 2015: Dr Janak Shah is an accomplished and prolific eye surgeon who volunteers his services to the global poor via SEE International, an NGO with a focus on curing blindness. He is seen examining and performing eye surgery at the Baba Loknath Eye Mission hospital. This is a long established religious mission that offers facilities to SEE where Janak can run a blindness camp as well as perform the surgeries required. Janak graduated from the University of Bombay in 1991, and completed his residency in ophthalmology in 1996. He’s been volunteering with SEE International as an eye surgeon since 1996, and in 2013, passed the milestone of 100 SEE expeditions. He is SEE’s most prolific doctor and has worked in places like the Peruvian Jungle, Gaza Strip, Lebanon, Mongolia, China, Brazil and many other remote locations. He has worked all over India and has performed thousands of eye surgeries, addressing every kind of illness. Janak is a proud adherent of the Jainism religion; he is a strong believer in their religious tenants of mankind being one. Janak often works with his wife Preeti, herself a talented eye surgeon. Together they are a formidable force and can work quickly on a multitude of surgeries in a single day. They have two daughters, one of 11 and the other 15. Both girls often travel with their parents on their volunteer trips for SEE and actively assistant in patient diagnosis as well as assisting their parents in surgery. Janak and Preeti both believe this gives the girls a real perspective on their place in the world and helps to bind them as a family unit. The Shahs live in Mumbai, India and run a successful eye surgery practice when they are not volunteering for SEE International. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis)

SHRI BHOJAY SARVODAYA EYE HOSPITAL, BHUJ, KUTCH, INDIA, JULY 22 2015: Eye surgeons Janak and Preeti Shah working via headlamp on a surgical operation during a powercut in this remote region of India. Dr Janak Shah is an accomplished and prolific eye surgeon who volunteers his services to the global poor via SEE International, an NGO with a focus on curing blindness. He and his wife Preeti are seen examining and performing eye surgery at the Shri Bhojay Sarvodaya Eye hospital close to the India Pakistan border. This is a new hospital that offers modern facilities to SEE where Janak can run a blindness camp as well as perform the surgeries required. Janak graduated from the University of Bombay in 1991, and completed his residency in ophthalmology in 1996. He’s been volunteering with SEE International as an eye surgeon since 1996, and in 2013, passed the milestone of 100 SEE expeditions. He is SEE’s most prolific doctor and has worked in places like the Peruvian Jungle, Gaza Strip, Lebanon, Mongolia, China, Brazil and many other remote locations. He has worked all over India and has performed thousands of eye surgeries, addressing every kind of illness. Janak is a proud adherent of the Jainism religion; he is a strong believer in their religious tenants of mankind being one. Janak often works with his wife Preeti, herself a talented eye surgeon. Together they are a formidable force and can work quickly on a multitude of surgeries in a single day. They have two daughters, one of 11 and the other 15. Both girls often travel with their parents on their volunteer trips for SEE and actively assistant in patient diagnosis as well as assisting their parents in surgery. Janak and Preeti both believe this gives the girls a real perspective on their place in the world and helps to bind them as a family unit. The Shahs live in Mumbai, India and run a successful eye surgery practice when they are not volunteering for SEE International. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis)

SILIGURI, DARJEELING DISTRICT, INDIA, JULY 22 2015: Dr Janak Shah is an accomplished and prolific eye surgeon who volunteers his services to the global poor via SEE International, an NGO with a focus on curing blindness. He is seen examining and performing eye surgery at the Baba Loknath Eye Mission hospital. This is a long established religious mission that offers facilities to SEE where Janak can run a blindness camp as well as perform the surgeries required. Janak graduated from the University of Bombay in 1991, and completed his residency in ophthalmology in 1996. He’s been volunteering with SEE International as an eye surgeon since 1996, and in 2013, passed the milestone of 100 SEE expeditions. He is SEE’s most prolific doctor and has worked in places like the Peruvian Jungle, Gaza Strip, Lebanon, Mongolia, China, Brazil and many other remote locations. He has worked all over India and has performed thousands of eye surgeries, addressing every kind of illness. Janak is a proud adherent of the Jainism religion; he is a strong believer in their religious tenants of mankind being one. Janak often works with his wife Preeti, herself a talented eye surgeon. Together they are a formidable force and can work quickly on a multitude of surgeries in a single day. They have two daughters, one of 11 and the other 15. Both girls often travel with their parents on their volunteer trips for SEE and actively assistant in patient diagnosis as well as assisting their parents in surgery. Janak and Preeti both believe this gives the girls a real perspective on their place in the world and helps to bind them as a family unit. The Shahs live in Mumbai, India and run a successful eye surgery practice when they are not volunteering for SEE International. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis)

SHRI BHOJAY SARVODAYA EYE HOSPITAL, BHUJ, KUTCH, INDIA, JULY 22 2015: Dr Janak Shah examines patients after a series of successful eye surgreries. He is an accomplished and prolific eye surgeon who volunteers his services to the global poor via SEE International, an NGO with a focus on curing blindness. He is seen examining patients after he haHe and his wife Preeti are seen examining and performing eye surgery at the Shri Bhojay Sarvodaya Eye hospital close to the India Pakistan border. This is a new hospital that offers modern facilities to SEE where Janak can run a blindness camp as well as perform the surgeries required. Janak graduated from the University of Bombay in 1991, and completed his residency in ophthalmology in 1996. He’s been volunteering with SEE International as an eye surgeon since 1996, and in 2013, passed the milestone of 100 SEE expeditions. He is SEE’s most prolific doctor and has worked in places like the Peruvian Jungle, Gaza Strip, Lebanon, Mongolia, China, Brazil and many other remote locations. He has worked all over India and has performed thousands of eye surgeries, addressing every kind of illness. Janak is a proud adherent of the Jainism religion; he is a strong believer in their religious tenants of mankind being one. Janak often works with his wife Preeti, herself a talented eye surgeon. Together they are a formidable force and can work quickly on a multitude of surgeries in a single day. They have two daughters, one of 11 and the other 15. Both girls often travel with their parents on their volunteer trips for SEE and actively assistant in patient diagnosis as well as assisting their parents in surgery. Janak and Preeti both believe this gives the girls a real perspective on their place in the world and helps to bind them as a family unit. The Shahs live in Mumbai, India and run a successful eye surgery practice when they are not volunteering for SEE International. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis)

SILIGURI, DARJEELING DISTRICT, INDIA, JULY 22 2015: Dr Janak Shah is an accomplished and prolific eye surgeon who volunteers his services to the global poor via SEE International, an NGO with a focus on curing blindness. He is seen examining and performing eye surgery at the Baba Loknath Eye Mission hospital. This is a long established religious mission that offers facilities to SEE where Janak can run a blindness camp as well as perform the surgeries required. Janak graduated from the University of Bombay in 1991, and completed his residency in ophthalmology in 1996. He’s been volunteering with SEE International as an eye surgeon since 1996, and in 2013, passed the milestone of 100 SEE expeditions. He is SEE’s most prolific doctor and has worked in places like the Peruvian Jungle, Gaza Strip, Lebanon, Mongolia, China, Brazil and many other remote locations. He has worked all over India and has performed thousands of eye surgeries, addressing every kind of illness. Janak is a proud adherent of the Jainism religion; he is a strong believer in their religious tenants of mankind being one. Janak often works with his wife Preeti, herself a talented eye surgeon. Together they are a formidable force and can work quickly on a multitude of surgeries in a single day. They have two daughters, one of 11 and the other 15. Both girls often travel with their parents on their volunteer trips for SEE and actively assistant in patient diagnosis as well as assisting their parents in surgery. Janak and Preeti both believe this gives the girls a real perspective on their place in the world and helps to bind them as a family unit. The Shahs live in Mumbai, India and run a successful eye surgery practice when they are not volunteering for SEE International. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis)

KISUMU, KENYA, 18 JUNE 2015: A mother and child under mosquito netting, a major weapon in these rural areas in the fight against Malaria. A Malaria surveilance team from the Walter Read Project on Malaria undertakes daily case studies in the Nyanza District of Kisumu, Kenya. The surveilance team will typically weight the child, take down the family details and medical history, conduct a Rapid Test for malaria, draw a blood sample and continue to monitor that child for up to a 4 year period. Their work is invaluable in providing samples to monitor the path and progress and mutation of Malaria. Seven different teams work 5 days a week, visiting 5 households per day across the Nyanza district. Agnes Akoth Onyango, 57, is the Chief Nurse of the Walter Read Project, Kisumu, Kenya. Agnes is seen at the Kemri Insectology lab where mosquitos are specifically bred for Malaria research. Agnes has been a front line nurse in the fight against Malaria for over 31 years. She administers the staff at the Walter Read research facility and also has strong relations with the Kombewa District hospital. Agnes works with a number of field surveillance teams who monitor the population of the Nyanza province of Kenya, helping to maintain and update Walter Read’s case studies of over 40 years research into Malaria. Agnes supervises the teams, works with the laboratory staff and the local hospitals in keeping an up to date record on the progress of Malaria, staying one step ahead of the disease which kills over 5 million people annually. She also works with the Kemri group of disease research facilities in the Kisumu area. These provide a valuable database for the mutation of the Malaria parasite, helping to develop effective medication to combat the disease. Agnes has devoted her life to this theme, finding self-worth and tremendous satisfaction in her work. She is well know across her community and still finds time to go with surveillance teams to build case studies as well lecture on M

KISUMU, KENYA, 21 JUNE 2015: Agnes Akoth Onyango, 57, Chief Nurse of the Walter Read Project, Kisumu, Kenya. Agnes has been a front line nurse in the fight against Malaria for over 31 years. She administers the staff at the Walter Read research facility and also has strong relations with the Kombewa District hospital. Agnes works with a number of field surveillance teams who monitor the population of the Nyanza province of Kenya, helping to maintain and update Walter Read’s case studies of over 40 years research into Malaria. Agnes supervises the teams, works with the laboratory staff and the local hospitals in keeping an up to date record on the progress of Malaria, staying one step ahead of the disease which kills over 5 million people annually. She also works with the Kemri group of disease research facilities in the Kisumu area. These provide a valuable database for the mutation of the Malaria parasite, helping to develop effective medication to combat the disease. Agnes has devoted her life to this theme, finding self-worth and tremendous satisfaction in her work. She is well know across her community and still finds time to go with surveillance teams to build case studies as well lecture on Malaria education when she can make the time. Agnes remains hopeful for the eradication of Malaria, believing a cure is within our grasp if research and funding is maintained. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis)

1. KISUMU, KENYA, 21 JUNE 2015: Agnes Akoth Onyango, 57, Chief Nurse of the Walter Read Project, Kisumu, Kenya. Agnes has been a front line nurse in the fight against Malaria for over 31 years. Here she is seen dealing with a child who has the dual complications of severe burns as well as Malaria. This has to be handled carefully as the medications can conflict with each other in the child's delicate body. Agnes has 31 years of experience with this kind of complication. Her chief role is to administer the staff at the Walter Read research facility and also has strong relations with the Kombewa District hospital. Agnes works with a number of field surveillance teams who monitor the population of the Nyanza province of Kenya, helping to maintain and update Walter Read’s case studies of over 40 years research into Malaria. Agnes supervises the teams, works with the laboratory staff and the local hospitals in keeping an up to date record on the progress of Malaria, staying one step ahead of the disease which kills over 5 million people annually. She also works with the Kemri group of disease research facilities in the Kisumu area. These provide a valuable database for the mutation of the Malaria parasite, helping to develop effective medication to combat the disease. Agnes has devoted her life to this theme, finding self-worth and tremendous satisfaction in her work. She is well know across her community and still finds time to go with surveillance teams to build case studies as well lecture on Malaria education when she can make the time. Agnes remains hopeful for the eradication of Malaria, believing a cure is within our grasp if research and funding is maintained. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis)

KISUMU, KENYA, 21 JUNE 2015: Rural homes in the rain close to the Walter Read Project, Kisumu, Kenya. Agnes Akoth Onyango, 57, Chief Nurse of the Walter Read Project, Agnes has been a front line nurse in the fight against Malaria for over 31 years. She administers the staff at the Walter Read research facility and also has strong relations with the Kombewa District hospital. Agnes works with a number of field surveillance teams who monitor the population of the Nyanza province of Kenya, helping to maintain and update Walter Read’s case studies of over 40 years research into Malaria. Agnes supervises the teams, works with the laboratory staff and the local hospitals in keeping an up to date record on the progress of Malaria, staying one step ahead of the disease which kills over 5 million people annually. She also works with the Kemri group of disease research facilities in the Kisumu area. These provide a valuable database for the mutation of the Malaria parasite, helping to develop effective medication to combat the disease. Agnes has devoted her life to this theme, finding self-worth and tremendous satisfaction in her work. She is well know across her community and still finds time to go with surveillance teams to build case studies as well lecture on Malaria education when she can make the time. Agnes remains hopeful for the eradication of Malaria, believing a cure is within our grasp if research and funding is maintained. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis)

KISUMU, KENYA, 21 JUNE 2015: Three woman from the Legion of Mary, a popular religious group in the Kisumu region of Kenya. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis)

KISUMU, KENYA, 18 JUNE 2015: A malaria surveilance team from the Walter Read Project on Malaria undertakes a case study on a young child in the Nyanza District of Kisumu, Kenya. This boy is in a febrile state, with advanced Malaria parasites attacking the red blood cells in his body. He was taken to hospital immediately after permission was obtained from the head of the household. The surveilance team will typically weight the child, take down the family details and medical history, conduct a Rapid Test for malaria, draw a blood sample and continue to monitor that child for up to a 4 year period. Their work is invaluable in providing samples to monitor the path and progress and mutation of Malaria. Seven different teams work 5 days a week, visiting 5 households per day across the Nyanza district. Agnes Akoth Onyango, 57, is the Chief Nurse of the Walter Read Project, Kisumu, Kenya. Agnes is seen at the Kemri Insectology lab where mosquitos are specifically bred for Malaria research. Agnes has been a front line nurse in the fight against Malaria for over 31 years. She administers the staff at the Walter Read research facility and also has strong relations with the Kombewa District hospital. Agnes works with a number of field surveillance teams who monitor the population of the Nyanza province of Kenya, helping to maintain and update Walter Read’s case studies of over 40 years research into Malaria. Agnes supervises the teams, works with the laboratory staff and the local hospitals in keeping an up to date record on the progress of Malaria, staying one step ahead of the disease which kills over 5 million people annually. She also works with the Kemri group of disease research facilities in the Kisumu area. These provide a valuable database for the mutation of the Malaria parasite, helping to develop effective medication to combat the disease. Agnes has devoted her life to this theme, finding self-worth and tremendous satisfaction in her work. She is well know across

KISUMU, KENYA, 18 JUNE 2015: A malaria surveilance team from the Walter Read Project on Malaria undertakes a case study on a young child in the Nyanza District of Kisumu, Kenya. They will weight the child, take down the family details and medical history, conduct a Rapid Test for malaria, draw a blood sample and continue to monitor that child for up to a 4 year period. Their work is invaluable in providing samples to monitor the path and progress and mutation of Malaria. Seven different teams work 5 days a week, visiting 5 households per day across the Nyanza district. Agnes Akoth Onyango, 57, is the Chief Nurse of the Walter Read Project, Kisumu, Kenya. Agnes is seen at the Kemri Insectology lab where mosquitos are specifically bred for Malaria research. Agnes has been a front line nurse in the fight against Malaria for over 31 years. She administers the staff at the Walter Read research facility and also has strong relations with the Kombewa District hospital. Agnes works with a number of field surveillance teams who monitor the population of the Nyanza province of Kenya, helping to maintain and update Walter Read’s case studies of over 40 years research into Malaria. Agnes supervises the teams, works with the laboratory staff and the local hospitals in keeping an up to date record on the progress of Malaria, staying one step ahead of the disease which kills over 5 million people annually. She also works with the Kemri group of disease research facilities in the Kisumu area. These provide a valuable database for the mutation of the Malaria parasite, helping to develop effective medication to combat the disease. Agnes has devoted her life to this theme, finding self-worth and tremendous satisfaction in her work. She is well know across her community and still finds time to go with surveillance teams to build case studies as well lecture on Malaria education when she can make the time. Agnes remains hopeful for the eradication of Malaria, believing a cure is withi

KISUMU, KENYA, 18 JUNE 2015: A Malaria surveilance team from the Walter Read Project on Malaria undertakes a case study on a young child in the Nyanza District of Kisumu, Kenya. They will weight the child, take down the family details and medical history, conduct a Rapid Test for malaria, draw a blood sample and continue to monitor that child for up to a 4 year period. Their work is invaluable in providing samples to monitor the path and progress and mutation of Malaria. Seven different teams work 5 days a week, visiting 5 households per day across the Nyanza district. Agnes Akoth Onyango, 57, is the Chief Nurse of the Walter Read Project, Kisumu, Kenya. Agnes is seen at the Kemri Insectology lab where mosquitos are specifically bred for Malaria research. Agnes has been a front line nurse in the fight against Malaria for over 31 years. She administers the staff at the Walter Read research facility and also has strong relations with the Kombewa District hospital. Agnes works with a number of field surveillance teams who monitor the population of the Nyanza province of Kenya, helping to maintain and update Walter Read’s case studies of over 40 years research into Malaria. Agnes supervises the teams, works with the laboratory staff and the local hospitals in keeping an up to date record on the progress of Malaria, staying one step ahead of the disease which kills over 5 million people annually. She also works with the Kemri group of disease research facilities in the Kisumu area. These provide a valuable database for the mutation of the Malaria parasite, helping to develop effective medication to combat the disease. Agnes has devoted her life to this theme, finding self-worth and tremendous satisfaction in her work. She is well know across her community and still finds time to go with surveillance teams to build case studies as well lecture on Malaria education when she can make the time. Agnes remains hopeful for the eradication of Malaria, believing a cure is withi

KISUMU, KENYA, 18 JUNE 2015: Kenyan farmer's and parents Norman and Akinyi Otieno mourn the loss of a child two weeks previously to Malaria. This is the second child they have lost to the disease. 5 million people are estimated to die annually from the disease, the rural poor of Africa are amongst the most vulnerable. Agnes Akoth Onyango, 57, is the Chief Nurse of the Walter Read Project, Kisumu, Kenya. Agnes is seen at the Kemri Insectology lab where mosquitos are specifically bred for Malaria research. Agnes has been a front line nurse in the fight against Malaria for over 31 years. She administers the staff at the Walter Read research facility and also has strong relations with the Kombewa District hospital. Agnes works with a number of field surveillance teams who monitor the population of the Nyanza province of Kenya, helping to maintain and update Walter Read’s case studies of over 40 years research into Malaria. Agnes supervises the teams, works with the laboratory staff and the local hospitals in keeping an up to date record on the progress of Malaria, staying one step ahead of the disease which kills over 5 million people annually. She also works with the Kemri group of disease research facilities in the Kisumu area. These provide a valuable database for the mutation of the Malaria parasite, helping to develop effective medication to combat the disease. Agnes has devoted her life to this theme, finding self-worth and tremendous satisfaction in her work. She is well know across her community and still finds time to go with surveillance teams to build case studies as well lecture on Malaria education when she can make the time. Agnes remains hopeful for the eradication of Malaria, believing a cure is within our grasp if research and funding is maintained. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis)

KISUMU, KENYA, 18 JUNE 2015: A mother and child under mosquito netting, a major weapon in these rural areas in the fight against Malaria. A Malaria surveilance team from the Walter Read Project on Malaria undertakes daily case studies in the Nyanza District of Kisumu, Kenya. The surveilance team will typically weight the child, take down the family details and medical history, conduct a Rapid Test for malaria, draw a blood sample and continue to monitor that child for up to a 4 year period. Their work is invaluable in providing samples to monitor the path and progress and mutation of Malaria. Seven different teams work 5 days a week, visiting 5 households per day across the Nyanza district. Agnes Akoth Onyango, 57, is the Chief Nurse of the Walter Read Project, Kisumu, Kenya. Agnes is seen at the Kemri Insectology lab where mosquitos are specifically bred for Malaria research. Agnes has been a front line nurse in the fight against Malaria for over 31 years. She administers the staff at the Walter Read research facility and also has strong relations with the Kombewa District hospital. Agnes works with a number of field surveillance teams who monitor the population of the Nyanza province of Kenya, helping to maintain and update Walter Read’s case studies of over 40 years research into Malaria. Agnes supervises the teams, works with the laboratory staff and the local hospitals in keeping an up to date record on the progress of Malaria, staying one step ahead of the disease which kills over 5 million people annually. She also works with the Kemri group of disease research facilities in the Kisumu area. These provide a valuable database for the mutation of the Malaria parasite, helping to develop effective medication to combat the disease. Agnes has devoted her life to this theme, finding self-worth and tremendous satisfaction in her work. She is well know across her community and still finds time to go with surveillance teams to build case studies as well lecture on M

KISUMU, KENYA, 21 JUNE 2015: Agnes Akoth Onyango, 57, Chief Nurse of the Walter Read Project, Kisumu, Kenya, gives an educational lecture on Malaria to schoolchildren at the Diemo primary school close to the Walter Read facility. Agnes has been a front line nurse in the fight against Malaria for over 31 years. She administers the staff at the Walter Read research facility and also has strong relations with the Kombewa District hospital. Agnes works with a number of field surveillance teams who monitor the population of the Nyanza province of Kenya, helping to maintain and update Walter Read’s case studies of over 40 years research into Malaria. Agnes supervises the teams, works with the laboratory staff and the local hospitals in keeping an up to date record on the progress of Malaria, staying one step ahead of the disease which kills over 5 million people annually. She also works with the Kemri group of disease research facilities in the Kisumu area. These provide a valuable database for the mutation of the Malaria parasite, helping to develop effective medication to combat the disease. Agnes has devoted her life to this theme, finding self-worth and tremendous satisfaction in her work. She is well know across her community and still finds time to go with surveillance teams to build case studies as well lecture on Malaria education when she can make the time. Agnes remains hopeful for the eradication of Malaria, believing a cure is within our grasp if research and funding is maintained. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis)

CHONGWE DISTRICT, ZAMBIA, 14 JANUARY 2014: Rural community health care worker Dismuss,44, updates his medical records at his home in the Chongwe district of rural Zambia. Dismuss lives a distance of 14 kilometers from the nearest clinic and services over 500 households in his area. He adminsters rapid testing for Malaria and adminsters Coartem anti-Malarials for both adults and children. Dismuss is a volunteer worker and receives no pay for this work. He has 9 children and his wife was recently diagnosed with Leukemia. Chongwe District, Zambia. (Photo by Brent Stirton for Novartis)

CHONGWE DISTRICT, ZAMBIA, 14 JANUARY 2014: Rural community health care worker Dismuss,44, holds a small Malaria care workshop in the Chongwe district of rural Zambia. Dismuss lives a distance of 14 kilometers from the nearest clinic and services over 500 households in his area. He adminsters rapid testing for Malaria and adminsters Coartem anti-Malarials for both adults and children. Dismuss is a volunteer worker and receives no pay for this work. He has 9 children and his wife was recently diagnosed with Leukemia. Chongwe District, Zambia. (Photo by Brent Stirton for Novartis)

CHONGWE DISTRICT, ZAMBIA, 14 JANUARY 2014: Rural community health care worker Dismuss,44, performs a rapid test for Malaria on a young boy in the Chongwe district in rural Zambia. Dismuss lives a distance of 14 kilometers from the nearest clinic and services over 500 households in his area. He adminsters rapid testing for Malaria and adminsters Coartem anti-Malarials for both adults and children. Dismuss is a volunteer worker and receives no pay for this work. He has 9 children and his wife was recently diagnosed with Leukemia. Chongwe District, Zambia. (Photo by Brent Stirton for Novartis)

CHONGWE DISTRICT, ZAMBIA, 14 JANUARY 2014: Rural community health care worker Dismuss,44, seen with his bicycle ambulance in the Chongwe district in rural Zambia. Dismuss lives a distance of 14 kilometers from the nearest clinic and services over 500 households in his area. He adminsters rapid testing for Malaria and adminsters Coartem anti-Malarials for both adults and children. Dismuss is a volunteer worker and receives no pay for this work. He has 9 children and his wife was recently diagnosed with Leukemia. Chongwe District, Zambia. (Photo by Brent Stirton for Novartis)

CHONGWE DISTRICT, ZAMBIA, 14 JANUARY 2014: Rural community health care worker Dismuss,44, performs a rapid test for Malaria on a young mother in the Chongwe district in rural Zambia. Dismuss lives a distance of 14 kilometers from the nearest clinic and services over 500 households in his area. He adminsters rapid testing for Malaria and adminsters Coartem anti-Malarials for both adults and children. Dismuss is a volunteer worker and receives no pay for this work. He has 9 children and his wife was recently diagnosed with Leukemia. Chongwe District, Zambia. (Photo by Brent Stirton for Novartis)

CHONGWE DISTRICT, ZAMBIA, 14 JANUARY 2014: Rural community health care worker Dismuss,44, pedals his bicycle ambulance on the way to the rural Chongwe community clinic, delivering a young boy suffering from Malaria. Dismuss lives a distance of 14 kilometers from the clinic and services over 500 households in his area. He adminsters rapid testing for Malaria and adminster Coartem anti-Malarials for both adults and children. Dismuss is a volunteer worker and receives no pay for this work. He has 9 children and his wife was recently diagnosed with Leukemia. Chongwe District, Zambia. (Photo by Brent Stirton for Novartis)

CHONGWE DISTRICT, ZAMBIA, 14 JANUARY 2014: Rural community health care nurse, Sister Betty Habulembe at work in the rural Chongwe community clinic, Zambia. Betty is testing and administering Coartem anti-Malarials to Micho Kaulwe, who is suffering from Malaria. (Photo by Brent Stirton for Novartis)

NDOLA, ZAMBIA, 16 JANUARY 2014: Lab technican Mbanga Mmleba and Dr Christine Manyando of the Tropical Disease Research center at Ndola Central Hospital, Zambia. They are seen in a Mosquito breeding facility, Mmleba is capturing Malaria bearing mosquitos for examination under the microscope. (Photo by Brent Stirton for Novartis.)

NDOLA, ZAMBIA, 16 JANUARY 2014: Lab technican Osbert Namafente of the Tropical Disease Research center at Ndola Central Hospital, Zambia. Osbert is seen examining Malaria bearing mosquitos under the microscope. This lab is seeking vectors for the disease, identifying carriers and strains of malaria from Mosquitos captured all over Zambia. (Photo by Brent Stirton for Novartis.)

NDOLA, ZAMBIA, 16 JANUARY 2014: Lab technican Mbanga Mmleba of the Tropical Disease Research center at Ndola Central Hospital, Zambia. He is seen in a Mosquito breeding facility where Mmleba is using an aspirator for capturing Malaria bearing mosquitos for examination under the microscope. This lab attempts to map vectors for the disease by identifying which mosquitos are carrying which version of the disease. (Photo by Brent Stirton for Novartis.)

NDOLA, ZAMBIA, 16 JANUARY 2014: Researcher Eric M. Njunju prepares samples to identify the DNA strand of the Malaria pathogen at the Tropical Disease Research center at Ndola Central Hospital, Zambia. This technique is the most accurate manner by which to test for Malaria. (Photo by Brent Stirton for Novartis.)

NDOLA, ZAMBIA, 16 JANUARY 2014: Dr Christine Manyando examines a young child who has severe Malaria at the Arthur Davidson Children's Hospital, Ndola, Zambia. This child's condition is so severe that she is undergoing a blood transfusion in an attempt to remove the Malaria parasite from her young body. (Photo by Brent Stirton for Novartis.)

LUSAKA, ZAMBIA, 15 JANUARY 2014: Images from the Zambian Health Ministry's Medical Storage and Distribution center in Lusaka. Anti-malarial treatments first land at this facility and from here they are stored and distributed across the country. (Photo by Brent Stirton for Novartis.)

KISUMU, KENYA, 21 JUNE 2015: Sister Pheobe Odera suffers from both Diabetes and Hypertension but struggles to find medication despite working in a district hospital. She claims she is growing weaker and a simple cold can see her bed-ridden. Diabetes is on the rise in Africa, where non-communicable diseases are rising steadily, adding to the strain the more traditional diseases already place on populations. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis)

CHONGWE DISTRICT HOSPITAL, ZAMBIA, 14 JANUARY 2014: Child patient Blessings Nanyangwe is examined by doctors inside the malaria ward inside Chongwe District Hospital, Zambia. Blessing was brought in to the hospital five days previously with critical Malaria. Swift treatment with Coartem and a quinine solution has stabilized her and rid her body of the Malaria parasites. She is due to be discharged today. (Photo by Brent Stirton for Novartis)

PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA, USA, 15 JULY 2015: Dr Carl June, head of the Cart19 cancer program at UPenn surveys the Philadelphia skyline from the construction platform for his new laboratory. The lab is being built with help from Novartis who have supported Dr June for a number of years. Dr June has pioneered new Gene therapy in the search for a cure for cancer, revolutionizing how we may come to conquer the disease. He and his team have developed a means by which to use the HIV virus as a targeting vector for cancer cells, allowing the patients own T-cells to go to war once they have been turned into super cells and re-injected into the patients body. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis.)

MORRIS PLAINS, NEW JERSEY, 9 JULY 2015: Research scientists process human T cells inside the cell processing facility at the Morris Plains, New Jersey Novartis facility. This laboratory is where the T cells of cancer patients are processed and turned into super cells as part of a revolutionary new Gene therapy based cancer treatment Novartis is a part of. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis.)

PHILADELPHIA, PA, 7 JUNE 2014: Doug Olson, 67, had been living with chronic lymphocytic leukemia, or CLL, for 14 years. By 2010, after four rounds of chemotherapy, his only option seemed to be a bone marrow transplant with a 50 percent chance of success. That's when he became Upenn’s Patient Number Three in a gene therapy experiment designed to manipulate his immune system. The weapon is drawn from a patient's own body. Doctors at the University of Pennsylvania remove "T cells," or white blood cells that help fight infections. The cells are then genetically modified to recognize and attack cancer cells. One amazing aspect is the use of a modified HIV virus as a delivery system for the modified T cells. "The T cell can grow and divide," says oncologist Dr. David Porter, who is part of the team overseeing the therapy. "In fact, we've seen for every T cell that we genetically modify and put into a patient's body, it has the ability to kill up to 93,000 leukemia cells." In Olson's case, it took just three weeks to work. More than three years later, Olson is still in complete remission, and the modified T cells are still circulating. The hope is to use this same technique to make other types of cancer cells more visible to the body's immune system. At this time the UPenn medical team have a 86% success rate with this gene therapy in over 150 patients, signifying what is perhaps the greatest breakthrough yet in the fight against cancer. Doug Olson has been clear of cancer for over 4 years now. The first thing he did when he heard he was clear of cancer cells, was to go out and buy a boat. He enjoys sailing that with his grandkids, he runs regularly, maintains a healthy lifestyle and is a passionate advocate for this revolutionary cancer therapy. He spoke recently with Pennsylvania State legislators as the value of the program. Doug is a former Scientist by profession and is well qualified to speak on this treatment, both with the scientists and doctors at Upenn and als

PHILADELPHIA, PA, 7 JUNE 2014: Doug Olson, 67, had been living with chronic lymphocytic leukemia, or CLL, for 14 years. By 2010, after four rounds of chemotherapy, his only option seemed to be a bone marrow transplant with a 50 percent chance of success. That's when he became Upenn’s Patient Number Three in a gene therapy experiment designed to manipulate his immune system. The weapon is drawn from a patient's own body. Doctors at the University of Pennsylvania remove "T cells," or white blood cells that help fight infections. The cells are then genetically modified to recognize and attack cancer cells. One amazing aspect is the use of a modified HIV virus as a delivery system for the modified T cells. "The T cell can grow and divide," says oncologist Dr. David Porter, who is part of the team overseeing the therapy. "In fact, we've seen for every T cell that we genetically modify and put into a patient's body, it has the ability to kill up to 93,000 leukemia cells." In Olson's case, it took just three weeks to work. More than three years later, Olson is still in complete remission, and the modified T cells are still circulating. The hope is to use this same technique to make other types of cancer cells more visible to the body's immune system. At this time the UPenn medical team have a 86% success rate with this gene therapy in over 150 patients, signifying what is perhaps the greatest breakthrough yet in the fight against cancer. Doug Olson has been clear of cancer for over 4 years now. The first thing he did when he heard he was clear of cancer cells, was to go out and buy a boat. He enjoys sailing that with his grandkids, he runs regularly, maintains a healthy lifestyle and is a passionate advocate for this revolutionary cancer therapy. He spoke recently with Pennsylvania State legislators as the value of the program. Doug is a former Scientist by profession and is well qualified to speak on this treatment, both with the scientists and doctors at Upenn and als

PENNSYLVANIA, PA, 8 JUNE 2014: Emily Whitehead is a former Leukemia patient who at age 7 became Patient Zero in a revolutionary UPenn Medical gene therapy experiment designed to manipulate her immune system. Emily is seen with her parent Tom and Kari, since her remission Emily likes to spend time riding her ATV bike, hanging out with her dog and recently tried horse-riding for the first time. She has gone from being a final stage Cancer case to living life as a normal girl. The weapon which cured her is drawn from a patient's own body. Doctors at the University of Pennsylvania remove "T cells," or white blood cells that help fight infections. The cells are then genetically modified to recognize and attack cancer cells. One amazing aspect is the use of a modified HIV virus as a delivery system for the modified T cells. "The T cell can grow and divide," says oncologist Dr. David Porter, who is part of the team overseeing the therapy. "In fact, we've seen for every T cell that we genetically modify and put into a patient's body, it has the ability to kill up to 93,000 leukemia cells. These are words from a blog the Whitehead family put out to illuminate Emily's case: "Hi, I’m Emily! On Friday, May 28, 2010, just a few weeks after my 5th birthday, I was diagnosed with standard risk pre-b acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) at Hershey Medical Center. I was supposed to get chemotherapy treatments for 26 months and doctors said I had an 85%-90% chance of being cured; however, on October 6, 2011 I found out my leukemia relapsed and then they told me I only had a 30% chance of being cured. I received aggressive chemotherapy through January 2012 and was scheduled for a bone marrow transplant in February 2012; however, I found out on February 4, 2012, just two weeks before my transplant, that I relapsed again. Doctors tried more chemotherapy through the months of February and March but could not get me back into remission. At that point, doctors said that I was not going

PENNSYLVANIA, PA, 8 JUNE 2014: Emily Whitehead is a former Leukemia patient who at age 7 became Patient Zero in a revolutionary UPenn Medical gene therapy experiment designed to manipulate her immune system. Emily is seen with her parent Tom and Kari, since her remission Emily likes to spend time riding her ATV bike, hanging out with her dog and recently tried horse-riding for the first time. She has gone from being a final stage Cancer case to living life as a normal girl. The weapon which cured her is drawn from a patient's own body. Doctors at the University of Pennsylvania remove "T cells," or white blood cells that help fight infections. The cells are then genetically modified to recognize and attack cancer cells. One amazing aspect is the use of a modified HIV virus as a delivery system for the modified T cells. "The T cell can grow and divide," says oncologist Dr. David Porter, who is part of the team overseeing the therapy. "In fact, we've seen for every T cell that we genetically modify and put into a patient's body, it has the ability to kill up to 93,000 leukemia cells. These are words from a blog the Whitehead family put out to illuminate Emily's case: "Hi, I’m Emily! On Friday, May 28, 2010, just a few weeks after my 5th birthday, I was diagnosed with standard risk pre-b acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) at Hershey Medical Center. I was supposed to get chemotherapy treatments for 26 months and doctors said I had an 85%-90% chance of being cured; however, on October 6, 2011 I found out my leukemia relapsed and then they told me I only had a 30% chance of being cured. I received aggressive chemotherapy through January 2012 and was scheduled for a bone marrow transplant in February 2012; however, I found out on February 4, 2012, just two weeks before my transplant, that I relapsed again. Doctors tried more chemotherapy through the months of February and March but could not get me back into remission. At that point, doctors said that I was not going

PENNSYLVANIA, PA, 8 JUNE 2014: Emily Whitehead is a former Leukemia patient who at age 7 became Patient Zero in a revolutionary UPenn Medical gene therapy experiment designed to manipulate her immune system. Emily is seen with her parent Tom and Kari, since her remission Emily likes to spend time riding her ATV bike, hanging out with her dog and recently tried horse-riding for the first time. She has gone from being a final stage Cancer case to living life as a normal girl. The weapon which cured her is drawn from a patient's own body. Doctors at the University of Pennsylvania remove "T cells," or white blood cells that help fight infections. The cells are then genetically modified to recognize and attack cancer cells. One amazing aspect is the use of a modified HIV virus as a delivery system for the modified T cells. "The T cell can grow and divide," says oncologist Dr. David Porter, who is part of the team overseeing the therapy. "In fact, we've seen for every T cell that we genetically modify and put into a patient's body, it has the ability to kill up to 93,000 leukemia cells. These are words from a blog the Whitehead family put out to illuminate Emily's case: "Hi, I’m Emily! On Friday, May 28, 2010, just a few weeks after my 5th birthday, I was diagnosed with standard risk pre-b acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) at Hershey Medical Center. I was supposed to get chemotherapy treatments for 26 months and doctors said I had an 85%-90% chance of being cured; however, on October 6, 2011 I found out my leukemia relapsed and then they told me I only had a 30% chance of being cured. I received aggressive chemotherapy through January 2012 and was scheduled for a bone marrow transplant in February 2012; however, I found out on February 4, 2012, just two weeks before my transplant, that I relapsed again. Doctors tried more chemotherapy through the months of February and March but could not get me back into remission. At that point, doctors said that I was not going

PENNSYLVANIA, PA, 8 JUNE 2014: Emily Whitehead is a former Leukemia patient who at age 7 became Patient Zero in a revolutionary UPenn Medical gene therapy experiment designed to manipulate her immune system. Emily is seen with her parent Tom and Kari, since her remission Emily likes to spend time riding her ATV bike, hanging out with her dog and recently tried horse-riding for the first time. She has gone from being a final stage Cancer case to living life as a normal girl. The weapon which cured her is drawn from a patient's own body. Doctors at the University of Pennsylvania remove "T cells," or white blood cells that help fight infections. The cells are then genetically modified to recognize and attack cancer cells. One amazing aspect is the use of a modified HIV virus as a delivery system for the modified T cells. "The T cell can grow and divide," says oncologist Dr. David Porter, who is part of the team overseeing the therapy. "In fact, we've seen for every T cell that we genetically modify and put into a patient's body, it has the ability to kill up to 93,000 leukemia cells. These are words from a blog the Whitehead family put out to illuminate Emily's case: "Hi, I’m Emily! On Friday, May 28, 2010, just a few weeks after my 5th birthday, I was diagnosed with standard risk pre-b acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) at Hershey Medical Center. I was supposed to get chemotherapy treatments for 26 months and doctors said I had an 85%-90% chance of being cured; however, on October 6, 2011 I found out my leukemia relapsed and then they told me I only had a 30% chance of being cured. I received aggressive chemotherapy through January 2012 and was scheduled for a bone marrow transplant in February 2012; however, I found out on February 4, 2012, just two weeks before my transplant, that I relapsed again. Doctors tried more chemotherapy through the months of February and March but could not get me back into remission. At that point, doctors said that I was not going

PHILIDELPHIA, PA, USA, 9 JUNE 2014: Oncologist Dr. David Porter is part of the UPenn team overseeing the radical new cancer treatment therapy for the Cart 19 program. The treatment is based on a gene therapy experiment designed to manipulate the bodies own immune system. The weapon is drawn from a patient's own body. Doctors at the University of Pennsylvania remove "T cells," or white blood cells that help fight infections. The cells are then genetically modified to recognize and attack cancer cells. One amazing aspect is the use of a modified HIV virus as a delivery system for the modified T cells. "The T cell can grow and divide," says oncologist Dr. David Porter, who is part of the team overseeing the therapy. "In fact, we've seen for every T cell that we genetically modify and put into a patient's body, it has the ability to kill up to 93,000 leukemia cells." The hope is to use this same technique to make other types of cancer cells more visible to the body's immune system. At this time the UPenn medical team have a 86% success rate with this gene therapy in over 150 patients, signifying what is perhaps the greatest breakthrough yet in the fight against cancer. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage for Novartis.)

TROY, NEW YORK, 5 MAY 2014: Esme' Savoie, 3, suffers from a rare genetic disease know as PCDH19, a genetically mutated orphan disease of the kind which Novartis's N.I.B.R division feels they can learn a great deal, Troy, NY, 5 May 2014. Esme' is seen on her way to a a check up at Boston Childrens Hospital. She has a feeding tube which is permanently implanted in her stomach through which she receives all her meals. Esme's parents Hillary and Andre Savoie have become experts in Esme's syndrome and are involved in fundraising for continued research and are a study case for Boston Childrens hospital and Novartis. PCDH19 Female Limited Epilepsy has been diagnosed in approximately 200 girls and women worldwide. PCDH19 FLE have been associated with the occurrence of epilepsy, a spectrum of developmental delays, and behavioral issues that occur almost exclusively in girls and women. Novartis is one of the few big pharmaceutical companies which is doing extensive research into diseases of the brain. This is particularly important now as autism numbers are increasing and it is estimated that as many as 1 in 50 children is currently affected by this syndrome in one from or another. Novartis has made remarkable strides in their developments and Ricardo Dolmetsch, head of research, feels confident of major breakthroughs in the next few years. PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) has a spectrum of symptoms. Almost all of the girls affected by PCDH19 mutations exhibit seizures of many types, but the most typical characteristic of PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) is the tendency of the seizures to cluster and interfere with breathing (causing cyanotic spells). Some of the girls affected with PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) have cognitive delays, much of the research indicates that about two-thirds of the girls have Intellectual Delay (ID) ranging from mild to moderate. Additionally, about 40% of the girls with PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) are on the autism spectrum. Many of those with PCDH19 also exhibit behavioral and psychological prob

TROY, NEW YORK, 5 MAY 2014: Esme' Savoie, 3, suffers from a rare genetic disease know as PCDH19, a genetically mutated orphan disease of the kind which Novartis's N.I.B.R division feels they can learn a great deal, Troy, NY, 5 May 2014. Esme' is seen at Boston Childrens Hospital at her first ever dentists appointment. Esme's parents Hillary and Andre Savoie have become experts in Esme's syndrome and are involved in fundraising for continued research and are a study case for Boston Childrens hospital and Novartis. PCDH19 Female Limited Epilepsy has been diagnosed in approximately 200 girls and women worldwide. PCDH19 FLE have been associated with the occurrence of epilepsy, a spectrum of developmental delays, and behavioral issues that occur almost exclusively in girls and women. Novartis is one of the few big pharmaceutical companies which is doing extensive research into diseases of the brain. This is particularly important now as autism numbers are increasing and it is estimated that as many as 1 in 50 children is currently affected by this syndrome in one from or another. Novartis has made remarkable strides in their developments and Ricardo Dolmetsch, head of research, feels confident of major breakthroughs in the next few years. PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) has a spectrum of symptoms. Almost all of the girls affected by PCDH19 mutations exhibit seizures of many types, but the most typical characteristic of PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) is the tendency of the seizures to cluster and interfere with breathing (causing cyanotic spells). Some of the girls affected with PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) have cognitive delays, much of the research indicates that about two-thirds of the girls have Intellectual Delay (ID) ranging from mild to moderate. Additionally, about 40% of the girls with PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) are on the autism spectrum. Many of those with PCDH19 also exhibit behavioral and psychological problems including aggression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and, in some cases, schizophrenia. PCDH19

TROY, NEW YORK, 5 MAY 2014: Hillary Savoie takes her daughter outside for a bubble blowing session at their home in Troy, New york. Esme' Savoie, 3, suffers from a rare genetic disease know as PCDH19, a genetically mutated orphan disease of the kind which Novartis's N.I.B.R division feels they can learn a great deal, Troy, NY, 5 May 2014. Esme's parents Hillary and Andre Savoie have become experts in Esme's syndrome and are involved in fundraising for continued research and are a study case for Boston Childrens hospital and Novartis. PCDH19 Female Limited Epilepsy has been diagnosed in approximately 200 girls and women worldwide. PCDH19 FLE have been associated with the occurrence of epilepsy, a spectrum of developmental delays, and behavioral issues that occur almost exclusively in girls and women. Novartis is one of the few big pharmaceutical companies which is doing extensive research into diseases of the brain. This is particularly important now as autism numbers are increasing and it is estimated that as many as 1 in 50 children is currently affected by this syndrome in one from or another. Novartis has made remarkable strides in their developments and Ricardo Dolmetsch, head of research, feels confident of major breakthroughs in the next few years. PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) has a spectrum of symptoms. Almost all of the girls affected by PCDH19 mutations exhibit seizures of many types, but the most typical characteristic of PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) is the tendency of the seizures to cluster and interfere with breathing (causing cyanotic spells). Some of the girls affected with PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) have cognitive delays, much of the research indicates that about two-thirds of the girls have Intellectual Delay (ID) ranging from mild to moderate. Additionally, about 40% of the girls with PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) are on the autism spectrum. Many of those with PCDH19 also exhibit behavioral and psychological problems including aggression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and, in some cases,

TROY, NEW YORK, 5 MAY 2014: Hillary Savoie takes her daughter outside for a bubble blowing session at their home in Troy, New york. Esme' Savoie, 3, suffers from a rare genetic disease know as PCDH19, a genetically mutated orphan disease of the kind which Novartis's N.I.B.R division feels they can learn a great deal, Troy, NY, 5 May 2014. Esme's parents Hillary and Andre Savoie have become experts in Esme's syndrome and are involved in fundraising for continued research and are a study case for Boston Childrens hospital and Novartis. PCDH19 Female Limited Epilepsy has been diagnosed in approximately 200 girls and women worldwide. PCDH19 FLE have been associated with the occurrence of epilepsy, a spectrum of developmental delays, and behavioral issues that occur almost exclusively in girls and women. Novartis is one of the few big pharmaceutical companies which is doing extensive research into diseases of the brain. This is particularly important now as autism numbers are increasing and it is estimated that as many as 1 in 50 children is currently affected by this syndrome in one from or another. Novartis has made remarkable strides in their developments and Ricardo Dolmetsch, head of research, feels confident of major breakthroughs in the next few years. PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) has a spectrum of symptoms. Almost all of the girls affected by PCDH19 mutations exhibit seizures of many types, but the most typical characteristic of PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) is the tendency of the seizures to cluster and interfere with breathing (causing cyanotic spells). Some of the girls affected with PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) have cognitive delays, much of the research indicates that about two-thirds of the girls have Intellectual Delay (ID) ranging from mild to moderate. Additionally, about 40% of the girls with PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) are on the autism spectrum. Many of those with PCDH19 also exhibit behavioral and psychological problems including aggression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and, in some cases,

TROY, NEW YORK, 5 MAY 2014: Esme' Savoie, 3, suffers from a rare genetic disease know as PCDH19, a genetically mutated orphan disease of the kind which Novartis's N.I.B.R division feels they can learn a great deal, Troy, NY, 5 May 2014. Esme' is seen interacting with her grandfather and step-granmother on their small holding in upstate NY. Esme's parents Hillary and Andre Savoie have become experts in Esme's syndrome and are involved in fundraising for continued research and are a study case for Boston Childrens hospital and Novartis. PCDH19 Female Limited Epilepsy has been diagnosed in approximately 200 girls and women worldwide. PCDH19 FLE have been associated with the occurrence of epilepsy, a spectrum of developmental delays, and behavioral issues that occur almost exclusively in girls and women. Novartis is one of the few big pharmaceutical companies which is doing extensive research into diseases of the brain. This is particularly important now as autism numbers are increasing and it is estimated that as many as 1 in 50 children is currently affected by this syndrome in one from or another. Novartis has made remarkable strides in their developments and Ricardo Dolmetsch, head of research, feels confident of major breakthroughs in the next few years. PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) has a spectrum of symptoms. Almost all of the girls affected by PCDH19 mutations exhibit seizures of many types, but the most typical characteristic of PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) is the tendency of the seizures to cluster and interfere with breathing (causing cyanotic spells). Some of the girls affected with PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) have cognitive delays, much of the research indicates that about two-thirds of the girls have Intellectual Delay (ID) ranging from mild to moderate. Additionally, about 40% of the girls with PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) are on the autism spectrum. Many of those with PCDH19 also exhibit behavioral and psychological problems including aggression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and, in some cases,

TROY, NEW YORK, 5 MAY 2014: Esme' Savoie, 3, suffers from a rare genetic disease know as PCDH19, a genetically mutated orphan disease of the kind which Novartis's N.I.B.R division feels they can learn a great deal, Troy, NY, 5 May 2014. Esme' is seen with her granmother Mel and step grandfather Phil on their sheep farm in upstate NY. Esme's parents Hillary and Andre Savoie have become experts in Esme's syndrome and are involved in fundraising for continued research and are a study case for Boston Childrens hospital and Novartis. PCDH19 Female Limited Epilepsy has been diagnosed in approximately 200 girls and women worldwide. PCDH19 FLE have been associated with the occurrence of epilepsy, a spectrum of developmental delays, and behavioral issues that occur almost exclusively in girls and women. Novartis is one of the few big pharmaceutical companies which is doing extensive research into diseases of the brain. This is particularly important now as autism numbers are increasing and it is estimated that as many as 1 in 50 children is currently affected by this syndrome in one from or another. Novartis has made remarkable strides in their developments and Ricardo Dolmetsch, head of research, feels confident of major breakthroughs in the next few years. PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) has a spectrum of symptoms. Almost all of the girls affected by PCDH19 mutations exhibit seizures of many types, but the most typical characteristic of PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) is the tendency of the seizures to cluster and interfere with breathing (causing cyanotic spells). Some of the girls affected with PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) have cognitive delays, much of the research indicates that about two-thirds of the girls have Intellectual Delay (ID) ranging from mild to moderate. Additionally, about 40% of the girls with PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) are on the autism spectrum. Many of those with PCDH19 also exhibit behavioral and psychological problems including aggression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and, in some cases, schiz

TROY, NEW YORK, 5 MAY 2014: Esme' Savoie, 3, suffers from a rare genetic disease know as PCDH19, a genetically mutated orphan disease of the kind which Novartis's N.I.B.R division feels they can learn a great deal, Troy, NY, 5 May 2014. Esme's is seen with her parents Hillary and Andre Savoie who have become experts in Esme's syndrome and are involved in fundraising for continued research and are a study case for Boston Childrens hospital and Novartis. PCDH19 Female Limited Epilepsy has been diagnosed in approximately 200 girls and women worldwide. PCDH19 FLE have been associated with the occurrence of epilepsy, a spectrum of developmental delays, and behavioral issues that occur almost exclusively in girls and women. Novartis is one of the few big pharmaceutical companies which is doing extensive research into diseases of the brain. This is particularly important now as autism numbers are increasing and it is estimated that as many as 1 in 50 children is currently affected by this syndrome in one from or another. Novartis has made remarkable strides in their developments and Ricardo Dolmetsch, head of research, feels confident of major breakthroughs in the next few years. PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) has a spectrum of symptoms. Almost all of the girls affected by PCDH19 mutations exhibit seizures of many types, but the most typical characteristic of PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) is the tendency of the seizures to cluster and interfere with breathing (causing cyanotic spells). Some of the girls affected with PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) have cognitive delays, much of the research indicates that about two-thirds of the girls have Intellectual Delay (ID) ranging from mild to moderate. Additionally, about 40% of the girls with PCDH19 FLE (EFMR) are on the autism spectrum. Many of those with PCDH19 also exhibit behavioral and psychological problems including aggression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and, in some cases, schizophrenia. PCDH19 FLE may also cause hypotonia/ PCDH19 refers to a gene located

YAROSLAVL, RUSSIA, 15 MAY 2014: Nikolay Ivanovich Platonova, 82, and his wife Galina Vasilevna, 78, are both in the Novartis sponsored hypertension program at Yaroslavl Veterans Hospital in Russia. They have tried to remain healthy their whole lives but education and effective medication for healthy living and hypertension has been scarce in the region. Nikolay spent many years in the Soviet military and he continues to do his daily excercises from that period every day. Galina tries to feed them both healthy foods on a daily basis, with fruit when they can get it. They like to walk outside as part of their routine. Both Nikolay and Galina began seeing Dr Evgeniy Bybihin at the Yaroslavl Veterans Hospital as part of their treatment for hypertension. He has been instrumental in running a Novartis sponsored hypertension program for the hospital, this has seen patients admitted for up to three weeks for monitoring, education on hypertension and the use of correct medication. This program has seen a dramatic improvement in all of these areas in the Yaroslavl region as awareness of hypertension has improved not only amongst patients but also across the medical profession. Nikolay and Galina say that they now monitor their blood pressure on a regular basis and take their medication exactly as instructed. They feel better much better as a result and try to persuade their friends as to the benefits of a good education on the issue of hypertension. Novartis is involved in a number of initiatives across Russia. These include large scale facility buidling as well as partnerships with healthcare organisations and government. As part of the Yaroslavl healthcare systems improvement partnership project, Novartis is collaborating with the regional government of Yaroslavl in Russia, key clinicians and institutions to improve the diagnosis, screening and treatment of hypertension and reduce preventable death and disability from cardiovascular events. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage

YAROSLAVL, RUSSIA, 15 MAY 2014: Nikolay Ivanovich Platonova, 82, and his wife Galina Vasilevna, 78, are both in the Novartis sponsored hypertension program at Yaroslavl Veterans Hospital in Russia. They have tried to remain healthy their whole lives but education and effective medication for healthy living and hypertension has been scarce in the region. Nikolay spent many years in the Soviet military and he continues to do his daily excercises from that period every day. Galina tries to feed them both healthy foods on a daily basis, with fruit when they can get it. They like to walk outside as part of their routine. Both Nikolay and Galina began seeing Dr Evgeniy Bybihin at the Yaroslavl Veterans Hospital as part of their treatment for hypertension. He has been instrumental in running a Novartis sponsored hypertension program for the hospital, this has seen patients admitted for up to three weeks for monitoring, education on hypertension and the use of correct medication. This program has seen a dramatic improvement in all of these areas in the Yaroslavl region as awareness of hypertension has improved not only amongst patients but also across the medical profession. Nikolay and Galina say that they now monitor their blood pressure on a regular basis and take their medication exactly as instructed. They feel better much better as a result and try to persuade their friends as to the benefits of a good education on the issue of hypertension. Novartis is involved in a number of initiatives across Russia. These include large scale facility buidling as well as partnerships with healthcare organisations and government. As part of the Yaroslavl healthcare systems improvement partnership project, Novartis is collaborating with the regional government of Yaroslavl in Russia, key clinicians and institutions to improve the diagnosis, screening and treatment of hypertension and reduce preventable death and disability from cardiovascular events. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage

YAROSLAVL, RUSSIA, 14 MAY 2014: Scenes from a classroom of hypertension patients in the excercise studio at Yaroslavl Veterans Hospital, Russia. These classes preach proper excercise as one aspect of a regime to combat hypertension in Russia today. They are part of a Novartis sponsored program at the hospital designed to bring a greater awareness and education to hypertension issues in the region. Novartis is involved in a number of initiatives across Russia. These include large scale facility buidling as well as partnerships with healthcare organisations and government. As part of the Yaroslavl healthcare systems improvement partnership project, Novartis is collaborating with the regional government of Yaroslavl in Russia, key clinicians and institutions to improve the diagnosis, screening and treatment of hypertension and reduce preventable death and disability from cardiovascular events. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage for Novartis.)

YAROSLAVL, RUSSIA, 15 MAY 2014: Nikolay Ivanovich Platonova, 82, and his wife Galina Vasilevna, 78, are both in the Novartis sponsored hypertension program at Yaroslavl Veterans Hospital in Russia. They have tried to remain healthy their whole lives but education and effective medication for healthy living and hypertension has been scarce in the region. Nikolay spent many years in the Soviet military and he continues to do his daily excercises from that period every day. Galina tries to feed them both healthy foods on a daily basis, with fruit when they can get it. They like to walk outside as part of their routine. Both Nikolay and Galina began seeing Dr Evgeniy Bybihin at the Yaroslavl Veterans Hospital as part of their treatment for hypertension. He has been instrumental in running a Novartis sponsored hypertension program for the hospital, this has seen patients admitted for up to three weeks for monitoring, education on hypertension and the use of correct medication. This program has seen a dramatic improvement in all of these areas in the Yaroslavl region as awareness of hypertension has improved not only amongst patients but also across the medical profession. Nikolay and Galina say that they now monitor their blood pressure on a regular basis and take their medication exactly as instructed. They feel better much better as a result and try to persuade their friends as to the benefits of a good education on the issue of hypertension. Novartis is involved in a number of initiatives across Russia. These include large scale facility buidling as well as partnerships with healthcare organisations and government. As part of the Yaroslavl healthcare systems improvement partnership project, Novartis is collaborating with the regional government of Yaroslavl in Russia, key clinicians and institutions to improve the diagnosis, screening and treatment of hypertension and reduce preventable death and disability from cardiovascular events. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage

YAROSLAVL, RUSSIA, 15 MAY 2014: Nikolay Ivanovich Platonova, 82, and his wife Galina Vasilevna, 78, are both in the Novartis sponsored hypertension program at Yaroslavl Veterans Hospital in Russia. They have tried to remain healthy their whole lives but education and effective medication for healthy living and hypertension has been scarce in the region. Nikolay spent many years in the Soviet military and he continues to do his daily excercises from that period every day. Galina tries to feed them both healthy foods on a daily basis, with fruit when they can get it. They like to walk outside as part of their routine. Both Nikolay and Galina began seeing Dr Evgeniy Bybihin at the Yaroslavl Veterans Hospital as part of their treatment for hypertension. He has been instrumental in running a Novartis sponsored hypertension program for the hospital, this has seen patients admitted for up to three weeks for monitoring, education on hypertension and the use of correct medication. This program has seen a dramatic improvement in all of these areas in the Yaroslavl region as awareness of hypertension has improved not only amongst patients but also across the medical profession. Nikolay and Galina say that they now monitor their blood pressure on a regular basis and take their medication exactly as instructed. They feel better much better as a result and try to persuade their friends as to the benefits of a good education on the issue of hypertension. Novartis is involved in a number of initiatives across Russia. These include large scale facility buidling as well as partnerships with healthcare organisations and government. As part of the Yaroslavl healthcare systems improvement partnership project, Novartis is collaborating with the regional government of Yaroslavl in Russia, key clinicians and institutions to improve the diagnosis, screening and treatment of hypertension and reduce preventable death and disability from cardiovascular events. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage

YAROSLAVL, RUSSIA, 15 MAY 2014: Tamara Ivanovna Yachmentseva, 77, had a heart attack five years ago. She has been a kindergarten teacher for the last 55 years, building a facility in her local area of Yaroslavl and caring for multiple generations of children for over half a century. Tamara has tried to be healthy her whole life but education on healthy living and hypertension has been scarce in her region. When she had a heart attack Tamara begain seeing Dr Evgeniy Bybihin at the Yaroslavl Veterans Hospital. He has been instrumental in running a Novartis sponsored hypertension program for the hospital, this has seen patients admitted for up to three weeks for monitoring, education on hypertension and the use of correct medication. This program has seen a dramatic improvement in all of these areas in the Yaroslavl region as awareness of hypertension has improved not only amongst patients but also across the medical profession. Tamara says this program has been invaluable to her: "If my heart keeps going, I can do anything." Novartis is involved in a number of initiatives across Russia. These include large scale facility buidling as well as partnerships with healthcare organisations and government. As part of the Yaroslavl healthcare systems improvement partnership project, Novartis is collaborating with the regional government of Yaroslavl in Russia, key clinicians and institutions to improve the diagnosis, screening and treatment of hypertension and reduce preventable death and disability from cardiovascular events. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage for Novartis.)

YAROSLAVL, RUSSIA, 15 MAY 2014: Tamara Ivanovna Yachmentseva, 77, had a heart attack five years ago. She has been a kindergarten teacher for the last 55 years, building a facility in her local area of Yaroslavl and caring for multiple generations of children for over half a century. Tamara has tried to be healthy her whole life but education on healthy living and hypertension has been scarce in her region. When she had a heart attack Tamara begain seeing Dr Evgeniy Bybihin at the Yaroslavl Veterans Hospital. He has been instrumental in running a Novartis sponsored hypertension program for the hospital, this has seen patients admitted for up to three weeks for monitoring, education on hypertension and the use of correct medication. This program has seen a dramatic improvement in all of these areas in the Yaroslavl region as awareness of hypertension has improved not only amongst patients but also across the medical profession. Tamara says this program has been invaluable to her: "If my heart keeps going, I can do anything." Novartis is involved in a number of initiatives across Russia. These include large scale facility buidling as well as partnerships with healthcare organisations and government. As part of the Yaroslavl healthcare systems improvement partnership project, Novartis is collaborating with the regional government of Yaroslavl in Russia, key clinicians and institutions to improve the diagnosis, screening and treatment of hypertension and reduce preventable death and disability from cardiovascular events. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage for Novartis.)

YAROSLAVL, RUSSIA, 15 MAY 2014: Tamara Ivanovna Yachmentseva, 77, had a heart attack five years ago. She has been a kindergarten teacher for the last 55 years, building a facility in her local area of Yaroslavl and caring for multiple generations of children for over half a century. Tamara has tried to be healthy her whole life but education on healthy living and hypertension has been scarce in her region. When she had a heart attack Tamara begain seeing Dr Evgeniy Bybihin at the Yaroslavl Veterans Hospital. He has been instrumental in running a Novartis sponsored hypertension program for the hospital, this has seen patients admitted for up to three weeks for monitoring, education on hypertension and the use of correct medication. This program has seen a dramatic improvement in all of these areas in the Yaroslavl region as awareness of hypertension has improved not only amongst patients but also across the medical profession. Tamara says this program has been invaluable to her: "If my heart keeps going, I can do anything." Novartis is involved in a number of initiatives across Russia. These include large scale facility buidling as well as partnerships with healthcare organisations and government. As part of the Yaroslavl healthcare systems improvement partnership project, Novartis is collaborating with the regional government of Yaroslavl in Russia, key clinicians and institutions to improve the diagnosis, screening and treatment of hypertension and reduce preventable death and disability from cardiovascular events. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage for Novartis.)

BRIGHTON, MICHIGAN, USA, 25 MAY 2014: Ryan Groves is 27 years old and lives in Brighton, Michigan, where he participates in the Special Olympics while living with Tuberous Sclerosis. He is a track and field athlete and has won many medals at the Special Olympics. Some of Ryan’s resulting disorders associated with TSC include renal angiomyolipomas and mild autism. Ryan lives at home with his parents, Kathy and Bob, and has two older brothers as well as two pet dogs that he spends a great deal of time with. Ryan also works at a local supermarket chain called Krogers where he collects shopping trolleys and cleans the aisles. Ryan has benefitted from Afinitor, a drug made by Novartis which causes a significant reduction in tumors. This benefit for Ryan is actually a side bar discovery and not the original intent of the drug. It is an example of how research and development in the pharm world can lead to unexpected and beneficial discoveries. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage for Novartis.)

BRIGHTON, MICHIGAN, USA, 25 MAY 2014: Ryan Groves is 27 years old and lives in Brighton, Michigan, where he participates in the Special Olympics while living with Tuberous Sclerosis. He is a track and field athlete and has won many medals at the Special Olympics. Some of Ryan’s resulting disorders associated with TSC include renal angiomyolipomas and mild autism. Ryan lives at home with his parents, Kathy and Bob, and has two older brothers as well as two pet dogs that he spends a great deal of time with. Ryan also works at a local supermarket chain called Krogers where he collects shopping trolleys and cleans the aisles. Ryan has benefitted from Afinitor, a drug made by Novartis which causes a significant reduction in tumors. This benefit for Ryan is actually a side bar discovery and not the original intent of the drug. It is an example of how research and development in the pharm world can lead to unexpected and beneficial discoveries. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage for Novartis.)

LEBANON, TENNESSEE, USA, 30 MAY 2014: Whitney Lackey is a 17-year-old athlete living in Lebanon, Tennessee who participates in the Special Olympics while managing Tuberous Sclerosis. Whitney experiences renal angiomyolipomas, angiofibromas and cognitive delays associated with her TSC diagnosis. Whitney is an only child and lives at home with her parents, Sharon and Brent Lackey. Whitney has had multiple tumors all over her body since she was a baby and also suffers from seizures. Novartis makes a drug called Afinitor which was developed as a cancer medication. It has the unexpected effect of shrinking tumors in people with Tuberous Sclerosis. This underlines the importance of ongoing research and development for big Pharma, something Novartis does more of than any other pharmaceutical company. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage for Novartis.)

LEBANON, TENNESSEE, USA, 30 MAY 2014: Whitney Lackey is a 17-year-old athlete living in Lebanon, Tennessee who participates in the Special Olympics while managing Tuberous Sclerosis. Whitney experiences renal angiomyolipomas, angiofibromas and cognitive delays associated with her TSC diagnosis. Whitney is an only child and lives at home with her parents, Sharon and Brent Lackey. Whitney has had multiple tumors all over her body since she was a baby and also suffers from seizures. Novartis makes a drug called Afinitor which was developed as a cancer medication. It has the unexpected effect of shrinking tumors in people with Tuberous Sclerosis. This underlines the importance of ongoing research and development for big Pharma, something Novartis does more of than any other pharmaceutical company. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage for Novartis.)

LEBANON, TENNESSEE, USA, 30 MAY 2014: Whitney Lackey is a 17-year-old athlete living in Lebanon, Tennessee who participates in the Special Olympics while managing Tuberous Sclerosis. Whitney experiences renal angiomyolipomas, angiofibromas and cognitive delays associated with her TSC diagnosis. Whitney is an only child and lives at home with her parents, Sharon and Brent Lackey. Whitney has had multiple tumors all over her body since she was a baby and also suffers from seizures. Novartis makes a drug called Afinitor which was developed as a cancer medication. It has the unexpected effect of shrinking tumors in people with Tuberous Sclerosis. This underlines the importance of ongoing research and development for big Pharma, something Novartis does more of than any other pharmaceutical company. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage for Novartis.)

MU CANG CHAI, YEN BAI, VIETNAM, 6 JUNE 2015: Dr Chang As Sinh, 37, waits for patients at the community hospital in the hills over Mu Cang Chai. Sinh has worked in this community for over 10 years and is the only doctor in the community. He speaks the local Hmong dialect and is instrumental in medical care delivery to this remote ethnic minority. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis)

MU CANG CHAI, YEN BAI, VIETNAM, 5 JUNE 2015: Giang Giua Cua, 77, suffers from Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Obstruction, COPD, a common affliction amongst this community. Fires are burnt inside the home for both warmth and cooking, thereby causing potential respitory issues. Cua is visited at home by community doctor Chang As Sinh, 37. Sinh has worked in this community for over 10 years and is the only doctor in the community. (Photo by Brent Stirton/ Novartis)

MU CANG CHAI, YEN BAI, VIETNAM, 6 JUNE 2015: A volunteer doctor for the Novartis Cung Song Khoe program for Vietnam visits a very sick man who is suffering from kidney failure. The doctor monitors his condition and tries to help manage his deteriorating health. Poverty is very debilitating in these circumstances, with dialysis necessary, transport to the nearest canditate city, rent and food while there, the treatment itself, are all beyond this man's family and it is likely he will die. Doctors in the community are vital as cases like this can be seen earlier and help secured before it is too late. The Cung Song Khoe program is all about medical education, from what is happening with the body to how to deal with problems and what the correct medical procedure is to follow. (Photo by Brent Stirton/ Novartis.)

MU CANG CHAI, YEN BAI, VIETNAM, 5 JUNE 2015: Dr Chang As Sinh, 37, seen making his way to a house call in Mu Cang Chai. Sinh has worked in this community for over 10 years and is the only doctor in the community. He speaks the local Hmong dialect and is instrumental in medical care delivery to this remote ethnic minority. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis)

MU CANG CHAI, YEN BAI, VIETNAM, 5 JUNE 2015: Dr Chang As Sinh, 37, has worked in this community for over 10 years and is the only doctor in the community. He speaks the local Hmong dialect and is instrumental in medical care delivery to this remote ethnic minority. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis)

MU CANG CHAI, YEN BAI, VIETNAM, 6 JUNE 2015: Dr Chang As Sinh, 37, updates his records in his office in the community hospital in the hills over Mu Cang Chai. Sinh has worked in this community for over 10 years and is the only doctor in the community. He speaks the local Hmong dialect and is instrumental in medical care delivery to this remote ethnic minority. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis)

MU CANG CHAI, YEN BAI, VIETNAM, 6 JUNE 2015: Local Hmong women pose for pictures after coming up from working in the rice paddies below. The beautiful shapes of the rice paddies is something that Mu Cang Chai is famous for. Rice is the staple crop in a community where people earn on average less than one dollar a day. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis)

MU CANG CHAI, YEN BAI, VIETNAM, 5 JUNE 2015: local people prepare the rice paddies Mu Cang Chai is famous for. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis)

MU CANG CHAI, VIETNAM, 7 JUNE 2015: The Director of Mu Cang Chai Preventative Health Centre, Dr Cu Ahong, does his rounds to visit with his many patients. His district is 90% ethnic Hmong people and his small hospital deals with many ailments that his communal clinics and healthworkers refer. He is seen here with a young couple with their first child, a caesarian birth he delivered. (photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis.)

MU CANG CHAI, VIETNAM, 7 JUNE 2015: The Director of Mu Cang Chai Preventative Health Centre, Dr Cu Ahong, does his rounds to visit with his many patients. His district is 90% ethnic Hmong people and his small hospital deals with many ailments that his communal clinics and healthworkers refer. He is seen here with a premature baby he delivered and the mother. (photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis.)

MU CANG CHAI, VIETNAM, 7 JUNE 2015: The Director of Mu Cang Chai Preventative Health Centre, Dr Cu Ahong, does his rounds to visit with his many patients. His district is 90% ethnic Hmong people and his small hospital deals with many ailments that his communal clinics and healthworkers refer. He is seen here with a young Hmong girl who has severe abdominal pain. Mu Thi Cha is her name and she is 8 years old. (photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis.)

MU CANG CHAI, VIETNAM, 7 JUNE 2015: The Director of Mu Cang Chai Preventative Health Centre, Dr Cu Ahong, does his rounds to visit with his many patients. His district is 90% ethnic Hmong people and his small hospital deals with many ailments that his communal clinics and health-workers refer. He is seen in his emergency room with a Hmong woman Lu Thi Bau who has a bacterial infection which has resulted in septicemia. He is monitoring her with antibiotics for now, (photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis.)

HANOI, VIETNAM, 9 JUNE 2015: Tradional healthcare stores in the old quarter of Hanoi, Vietnam. Medical treatments are changing in Vietnam but with an ancient tradtional medicine system in place that will take time. The pharmaceutical industry in Vietnam is growing at a rapid 17% per annum but much of that is with unregulated medicines which are expensive for a population where many still struggle with poverty. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Novartis)

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SEPTEMBER 2015: Dr Amy Rothberg seen at home in Ann Arbor, Michigan. Dr Rothberg is one of the foremost medical authorities on the science of obesity medicine in America. She runs the weight management program for the University of Michigan Health system. Amy E. Rothberg, MD, PhD, is Assistant Professor of Internal Medicine in the Division of Metabolism, Endocrinology and Diabetes and Director of the Weight Management Clinic. She specializes in the treatment of overweight and obesity, diabetes, and related metabolic diseases. Dr. Rothberg is one of the first in the nation to receive certification in obesity medicine from the American Board of Obesity Medicine.This is an advanced weight loss program that accepts referrals from within the University of Michigan’s Health system and from community physicians. It embraces the notion of long term weight management for obese individuals. The weight management program provides intense educational, dietary, physical, behavioral and pharmacological interventions. The University of Michigan weight management program offers a 2 year intervention. There are 11 visits to a physician and 26 visits with a registered dietician during these 2 years. The first 3 to 6 months involve an intense dietary induction phase. At their first appointment all patients are asked to sign a contract agreeing to attend greater than 80% of their scheduled appointments with the physician and dietician during the initial 2 year period. At the first visit a comprehensive health and weight history is compiled. Anti-diabetic therapy is adjusted at this first visit to optimize glycemic control and to promote weight loss. Weight loss is then initiated by employing a very low calorie diet (800 kcal/day) The rationale is that meal replacement limits food choices and divorces patients from unhealthy consumptive behavior. Patients keep daily diaries of these behaviors. These are then reviewed with the dietician on a weekly basis. Patients

MICHIGAN, SEPTEMBER 2015: Jacob Jensen, 25, is an engineer who lives near Farmingtion, Michigan. He is a successful member of the University of Michigan's weight management program. Jacob has lost 57 pounds in the 9 months he has been in the program so far. He is seen speaking in consultation with Dr Amy Rothberg as well as Christine Fowler, his dietician in the program. Jacob now runs regularly and has recently done a triathlon. His number is 7169821626. This is an advanced weight loss program that accepts referrals from within the University of Michigan’s Health system and from community physicians. It embraces the notion of long term weight management for obese individuals. The weight management program provides intense educational, dietary, physical, behavioral and pharmacological interventions. The University of Michigan weight management program offers a 2 year intervention. There are 11 visits to a physician and 26 visits with a registered dietician during these 2 years. The first 3 to 6 months involve an intense dietary induction phase. At their first appointment all patients are asked to sign a contract agreeing to attend greater than 80% of their scheduled appointments with the physician and dietician during the initial 2 year period. At the first visit a comprehensive health and weight history is compiled. Anti-diabetic therapy is adjusted at this first visit to optimize glycemic control and to promote weight loss. Weight loss is then initiated by employing a very low calorie diet (800 kcal/day) The rationale is that meal replacement limits food choices and divorces patients from unhealthy consumptive behavior. Patients keep daily diaries of these behaviors. These are then reviewed with the dietician on a weekly basis. Patients are then asked to increase their physical activity to 40 minutes per day. 3 to 6 months after this a weight loss of 15% is the average achievement. Regular foods are then reintroduced and the intervention begins to focus on behav

MICHIGAN, SEPTEMBER 2015: Jacob Jensen, 25, is an engineer who lives near Farmingtion, Michigan. He is a successful member of the University of Michigan's weight management program. Jacob has lost 57 pounds in the 9 months he has been in the program so far. He is seen speaking in consultation with Dr Amy Rothberg as well as Christine Fowler, his dietician in the program. Jacob now runs regularly and has recently done a triathlon. His number is 7169821626. This is an advanced weight loss program that accepts referrals from within the University of Michigan’s Health system and from community physicians. It embraces the notion of long term weight management for obese individuals. The weight management program provides intense educational, dietary, physical, behavioral and pharmacological interventions. The University of Michigan weight management program offers a 2 year intervention. There are 11 visits to a physician and 26 visits with a registered dietician during these 2 years. The first 3 to 6 months involve an intense dietary induction phase. At their first appointment all patients are asked to sign a contract agreeing to attend greater than 80% of their scheduled appointments with the physician and dietician during the initial 2 year period. At the first visit a comprehensive health and weight history is compiled. Anti-diabetic therapy is adjusted at this first visit to optimize glycemic control and to promote weight loss. Weight loss is then initiated by employing a very low calorie diet (800 kcal/day) The rationale is that meal replacement limits food choices and divorces patients from unhealthy consumptive behavior. Patients keep daily diaries of these behaviors. These are then reviewed with the dietician on a weekly basis. Patients are then asked to increase their physical activity to 40 minutes per day. 3 to 6 months after this a weight loss of 15% is the average achievement. Regular foods are then reintroduced and the intervention begins to focus on behav

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SEPTEMBER 2015: David Thomas has been a part of the University of Michigan’s Weight management program for 4 years. This is the second round for David as he did not achieve the goals he needed the first time. He is seen at the University of Michigan Exercise therapy lab with Exercise physiologists Heidi Reger and Ann Brennan. This is where he is monitored for body mass index, lung capacity and a specific exercise program is developed for his needs. David is diabetic and uses Insulin daily, other people on this program have been able to give up Insulin due to weight management successes. David would hope to do the same. He sticks to a prescribed diet and exercises regularly, utilizing gym in his home in Ann Arbor. David works in the motor industry in Detroit and has done so for many years. His contact numbers are as follows: 1 2488729001, 12483350309, 12482445786. His email is dthomas@comcast.netThis is an advanced weight loss program that accepts referrals from within the University of Michigan’s Health system and from community physicians. It embraces the notion of long term weight management for obese individuals. The weight management program provides intense educational, dietary, physical, behavioral and pharmacological interventions. The University of Michigan weight management program offers a 2 year intervention. There are 11 visits to a physician and 26 visits with a registered dietician during these 2 years. The first 3 to 6 months involve an intense dietary induction phase. At their first appointment all patients are asked to sign a contract agreeing to attend greater than 80% of their scheduled appointments with the physician and dietician during the initial 2 year period. At the first visit a comprehensive health and weight history is compiled. Anti-diabetic therapy is adjusted at this first visit to optimize glycemic control and to promote weight loss. Weight loss is then initiated by employing a very low calorie diet (800 kcal

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SEPTEMBER 2015: David Thomas has been a part of the University of Michigan’s Weight management program for 4 years. This is the second round for David as he did not achieve the goals he needed the first time. He is seen at the University of Michigan Exercise therapy lab with Exercise physiologists Heidi Reger and Ann Brennan. This is where he is monitored for body mass index, lung capacity and a specific exercise program is developed for his needs. David is diabetic and uses Insulin daily, other people on this program have been able to give up Insulin due to weight management successes. David would hope to do the same. He sticks to a prescribed diet and exercises regularly, utilizing gym in his home in Ann Arbor. David works in the motor industry in Detroit and has done so for many years. His contact numbers are as follows: 1 2488729001, 12483350309, 12482445786. His email is dthomas@comcast.netThis is an advanced weight loss program that accepts referrals from within the University of Michigan’s Health system and from community physicians. It embraces the notion of long term weight management for obese individuals. The weight management program provides intense educational, dietary, physical, behavioral and pharmacological interventions. The University of Michigan weight management program offers a 2 year intervention. There are 11 visits to a physician and 26 visits with a registered dietician during these 2 years. The first 3 to 6 months involve an intense dietary induction phase. At their first appointment all patients are asked to sign a contract agreeing to attend greater than 80% of their scheduled appointments with the physician and dietician during the initial 2 year period. At the first visit a comprehensive health and weight history is compiled. Anti-diabetic therapy is adjusted at this first visit to optimize glycemic control and to promote weight loss. Weight loss is then initiated by employing a very low calorie diet (800 kcal

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SEPTEMBER 2015: David Thomas has been a part of the University of Michigan’s Weight management program for 4 years. This is the second round for David as he did not achieve the goals he needed the first time. He is seen at the University of Michigan Exercise therapy lab where he is monitored by exercise physiologist Heidi Reger for body mass index, lung capacity and a specific exercise program is developed for his needs. David is diabetic and uses Insulin daily, other people on this program have been able to give up Insulin due to weight management successes. David would hope to do the same. He sticks to a prescribed diet and exercises regularly, utilizing gym in his home in Ann Arbor. David works in the motor industry in Detroit and has done so for many years. His contact numbers are as follows: 1 2488729001, 12483350309, 12482445786. His email is dthomas@comcast.netThis is an advanced weight loss program that accepts referrals from within the University of Michigan’s Health system and from community physicians. It embraces the notion of long term weight management for obese individuals. The weight management program provides intense educational, dietary, physical, behavioral and pharmacological interventions. The University of Michigan weight management program offers a 2 year intervention. There are 11 visits to a physician and 26 visits with a registered dietician during these 2 years. The first 3 to 6 months involve an intense dietary induction phase. At their first appointment all patients are asked to sign a contract agreeing to attend greater than 80% of their scheduled appointments with the physician and dietician during the initial 2 year period. At the first visit a comprehensive health and weight history is compiled. Anti-diabetic therapy is adjusted at this first visit to optimize glycemic control and to promote weight loss. Weight loss is then initiated by employing a very low calorie diet (800 kcal/day) The rationale is that

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