IQUITOS, PERU-JUNE 2007: Scenes on the Northern Peruvian Amazon River from the town of Nauta to the town of Trometeros, Peru, 8 June 2007. This pristine river and massive rainforest is under threat from infrastructure development in Peru. The Achuar Indian people of this Northern region recently won a legal battle with Argentinian Oil giant PlusPetrol to stop them dumping waste oil water, so called "hot-water" into their water supply. The amount is estimated at around 500 000 barrels a day over a period of 30 years. This has played havoc with the eco-systems around the town of Trompeteros. The oil company has yet to make good on its promises for payment and transparency. The oil company provides the bulk of employment for the polluted town of Trompeteros and thus has the local Achuan population under pressure to not pay attention to the pollution levels. The Achuan people are faced with a choice between a centuries old sustainable lifestyle in harmony with the environment or a move towards increased devastation of their natural lands in the Amazon basin by the oil industry. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

IQUITOS, PERU-JUNE 2007: Riverside scenes from the Amazonian town of Nauta to the oil town of Trometeros, Peru, 8 June 2007. This pristine river and massive rainforest is under threat from infrastructure development in Peru. The Achuar Indian people of this Northern region recently won a legal battle with Argentinian Oil giant PlusPetrol to stop them dumping waste oil water, so called "hot-water" into their water supply. The amount is estimated at around 500 000 barrels a day over a period of 30 years. This has played havoc with the eco-systems around the town of Trompeteros. The oil company has yet to make good on its promises for payment and transparency. The oil company provides the bulk of employment for the polluted town of Trompeteros and thus has the local Achuan population under pressure to not pay attention to the pollution levels. The Achuan people are faced with a choice between a centuries old sustainable lifestyle in harmony with the environment or a move towards increased devastation of their natural lands in the Amazon basin by the oil industry. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

IQUITOS, PERU-JUNE 2007: People and scenes in a riverside village on the Northern Amazon river, Peru, 8 June 2007. This pristine river and massive rainforest is under threat from infrastructure development in Peru. The Achuar Indian people of this Northern region recently won a legal battle with Argentinian Oil giant PlusPetrol to stop them dumping waste oil water, so called "hot-water" into their water supply. The amount is estimated at around 500 000 barrels a day over a period of 30 years. This has played havoc with the eco-systems around the town of Trompeteros. The oil company has yet to make good on its promises for payment and transparency. The oil company provides the bulk of employment for the polluted town of Trompeteros and thus has the local Achuan population under pressure to not pay attention to the pollution levels. The Achuan people are faced with a choice between a centuries old sustainable lifestyle in harmony with the environment or a move towards increased devastation of their natural lands in the Amazon basin by the oil industry. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

IQUITOS, PERU-JUNE 2007: Scenes from the Amazon river oil town of Trometeros, Peru, 8 June 2007. A bar in the town exhibits two Jaguar skins on its walls as well as Anaconda and Boa Constrictor skins. All of these are highly protected species and skins are illegal. This pristine river and massive rainforest is under threat from infrastructure development in Peru. The Achuar Indian people of this Northern region recently won a legal battle with Argentinian Oil giant PlusPetrol to stop them dumping waste oil water, so called "hot-water" into their water supply. The amount is estimated at around 500 000 barrels a day over a period of 30 years. This has played havoc with the eco-systems around the town of Trompeteros. The oil company has yet to make good on its promises for payment and transparency. The oil company provides the bulk of employment for the polluted town of Trompeteros and thus has the local Achuan population under pressure to not pay attention to the pollution levels. The Achuan people are faced with a choice between a centuries old sustainable lifestyle in harmony with the environment or a move towards increased devastation of their natural lands in the Amazon basin by the oil industry. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

IQUITOS, PERU-JUNE 2007: Scenes from the Amazon river oil town of Trometeros, Peru, 8 June 2007. A bar in the town exhibits two Jaguar skins on its walls as well as Anaconda and Boa Constrictor skins. All of these are highly protected species and skins are illegal. This pristine river and massive rainforest is under threat from infrastructure development in Peru. The Achuar Indian people of this Northern region recently won a legal battle with Argentinian Oil giant PlusPetrol to stop them dumping waste oil water, so called "hot-water" into their water supply. The amount is estimated at around 500 000 barrels a day over a period of 30 years. This has played havoc with the eco-systems around the town of Trompeteros. The oil company has yet to make good on its promises for payment and transparency. The oil company provides the bulk of employment for the polluted town of Trompeteros and thus has the local Achuan population under pressure to not pay attention to the pollution levels. The Achuan people are faced with a choice between a centuries old sustainable lifestyle in harmony with the environment or a move towards increased devastation of their natural lands in the Amazon basin by the oil industry. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

IQUITOS, PERU-JUNE 2007: Scenes from local riverside village homes, schools and fishing practises on the Northern Peruvian Amazon River from the town of Nauta to the town of Trometeros, Peru, 8 June 2007. This pristine river and massive rainforest is under threat from infrastructure development in Peru. The Achuar Indian people of this Northern region recently won a legal battle with Argentinian Oil giant PlusPetrol to stop them dumping waste oil water, so called "hot-water" into their water supply. The amount is estimated at around 500 000 barrels a day over a period of 30 years. This has played havoc with the eco-systems around the town of Trompeteros. The oil company has yet to make good on its promises for payment and transparency. The oil company provides the bulk of employment for the polluted town of Trompeteros and thus has the local Achuan population under pressure to not pay attention to the pollution levels. The Achuan people are faced with a choice between a centuries old sustainable lifestyle in harmony with the environment or a move towards increased devastation of their natural lands in the Amazon basin by the oil industry. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

IQUITOS, PERU-JUNE 2007: Scenes from local riverside village homes, schools and fishing practises on the Northern Peruvian Amazon River from the town of Nauta to the town of Trometeros, Peru, 8 June 2007. This pristine river and massive rainforest is under threat from infrastructure development in Peru. The Achuar Indian people of this Northern region recently won a legal battle with Argentinian Oil giant PlusPetrol to stop them dumping waste oil water, so called "hot-water" into their water supply. The amount is estimated at around 500 000 barrels a day over a period of 30 years. This has played havoc with the eco-systems around the town of Trompeteros. The oil company has yet to make good on its promises for payment and transparency. The oil company provides the bulk of employment for the polluted town of Trompeteros and thus has the local Achuan population under pressure to not pay attention to the pollution levels. The Achuan people are faced with a choice between a centuries old sustainable lifestyle in harmony with the environment or a move towards increased devastation of their natural lands in the Amazon basin by the oil industry. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

NORTHERN AMAZON, PERU-JUNE 2007: Aerial scenes from the Northern Amazon from the town of Iqitos to the Amazon oil town of Trompederos, Peru, 11 June 2007. The scenes show pristine forest as well as the impact of roads into the forest, roadside urbanisation and the effects of that. The images also show the oil town of Trompederos. Scenes there depict the industry of Petroplus, an Argentine oil company and the effect it has on the forest and the pipeline leading thorugh it. The Amazon is a pristine river and massive rainforest is under threat from infrastructure development in Peru. The Achuar Indian people of this Northern region recently won a legal battle with Argentinian Oil giant PlusPetrol to stop them dumping waste oil water, so called "hot-water" into their water supply. The amount is estimated at around 500 000 barrels a day over a period of 30 years. This has played havoc with the eco-systems around the town of Trompeteros. The oil company has yet to make good on its promises for payment and transparency. The oil company provides the bulk of employment for the polluted town of Trompeteros and thus has the local Achuan population under pressure to not pay attention to the pollution levels. The Achuan people are faced with a choice between a centuries old sustainable lifestyle in harmony with the environment or a move towards increased devastation of their natural lands in the Amazon basin by the oil industry. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

NORTHERN AMAZON, PERU-JUNE 2007: Aerial scenes from the Northern Amazon from the town of Iqitos to the Amazon oil town of Trompederos, Peru, 11 June 2007. The scenes show pristine forest as well as the impact of roads into the forest, roadside urbanisation and the effects of that. The images also show the oil town of Trompederos. Scenes there depict the industry of Petroplus, an Argentine oil company and the effect it has on the forest and the pipeline leading thorugh it. The Amazon is a pristine river and massive rainforest is under threat from infrastructure development in Peru. The Achuar Indian people of this Northern region recently won a legal battle with Argentinian Oil giant PlusPetrol to stop them dumping waste oil water, so called "hot-water" into their water supply. The amount is estimated at around 500 000 barrels a day over a period of 30 years. This has played havoc with the eco-systems around the town of Trompeteros. The oil company has yet to make good on its promises for payment and transparency. The oil company provides the bulk of employment for the polluted town of Trompeteros and thus has the local Achuan population under pressure to not pay attention to the pollution levels. The Achuan people are faced with a choice between a centuries old sustainable lifestyle in harmony with the environment or a move towards increased devastation of their natural lands in the Amazon basin by the oil industry. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

NORTHERN AMAZON, PERU-JUNE 2007: Aerial scenes from the Northern Amazon from the town of Iqitos to the Amazon oil town of Trompederos, Peru, 11 June 2007. The scenes show pristine forest as well as the impact of roads into the forest, roadside urbanisation and the effects of that. The images also show the oil town of Trompederos. Scenes there depict the industry of Petroplus, an Argentine oil company and the effect it has on the forest and the pipeline leading thorugh it. The Amazon is a pristine river and massive rainforest is under threat from infrastructure development in Peru. The Achuar Indian people of this Northern region recently won a legal battle with Argentinian Oil giant PlusPetrol to stop them dumping waste oil water, so called "hot-water" into their water supply. The amount is estimated at around 500 000 barrels a day over a period of 30 years. This has played havoc with the eco-systems around the town of Trompeteros. The oil company has yet to make good on its promises for payment and transparency. The oil company provides the bulk of employment for the polluted town of Trompeteros and thus has the local Achuan population under pressure to not pay attention to the pollution levels. The Achuan people are faced with a choice between a centuries old sustainable lifestyle in harmony with the environment or a move towards increased devastation of their natural lands in the Amazon basin by the oil industry. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

PUERTO MOLDONADO, PERU-JUNE 2007: Images of the construction of the Inter-Oceanica highway through the Andes from Cuzco into the Andes, Cuzco, Peru, 14 June 2007. The building of the Inter-Oceanica Highway road has had many effects on Peru. One of the longest, most ambitious road projects in the world, it crosses Peru through the Amazon rain forest regions and continues through the Andes into Brazil. It provides the potential for great economic growth for Peru through improved transportation routes which ease the need for imports in Peru. The road however threatens the fragile eco-systems through which it passes, and that threatens much of the sustainable, subsistence existence of many Peruvians. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

IQUITOS, PERU-JUNE 2007: Illegal timber being cut in a riverside village on the Northern Amazon river, Peru, 8 June 2007. This pristine river and massive rainforest is under threat from infrastructure development in Peru. The Achuar Indian people of this Northern region recently won a legal battle with Argentinian Oil giant PlusPetrol to stop them dumping waste oil water, so called "hot-water" into their water supply. The amount is estimated at around 500 000 barrels a day over a period of 30 years. This has played havoc with the eco-systems around the town of Trompeteros. The oil company has yet to make good on its promises for payment and transparency. The oil company provides the bulk of employment for the polluted town of Trompeteros and thus has the local Achuan population under pressure to not pay attention to the pollution levels. The Achuan people are faced with a choice between a centuries old sustainable lifestyle in harmony with the environment or a move towards increased devastation of their natural lands in the Amazon basin by the oil industry. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

IQUITOS, PERU-JUNE 2007: Scenes from a large plastic dumping ground cum primitive recycling area on the road from the Peruvian city of Iquitos to the town of Nauta, located alongside the Amazon river, Peru, 8 June 2007. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

IQUITOS, PERU-JUNE 2007: Traditonal market scenes on the Northern Amazon river town, Iquitos, Peru, 8 June 2007. The scenes show protected animals and animal meat for sale in the market and medicine made from rare snakes. This pristine river and massive rainforest is under threat from infrastructure development in Peru. The Achuar Indian people of this Northern region recently won a legal battle with Argentinian Oil giant PlusPetrol to stop them dumping waste oil water, so called "hot-water" into their water supply. The amount is estimated at around 500 000 barrels a day over a period of 30 years. This has played havoc with the eco-systems around the town of Trompeteros. The oil company has yet to make good on its promises for payment and transparency. The oil company provides the bulk of employment for the polluted town of Trompeteros and thus has the local Achuan population under pressure to not pay attention to the pollution levels. The Achuan people are faced with a choice between a centuries old sustainable lifestyle in harmony with the environment or a move towards increased devastation of their natural lands in the Amazon basin by the oil industry. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

IQUITOS, PERU-JUNE 2007: Traditonal market scenes on the Northern Amazon river town, Iquitos, Peru, 8 June 2007. The scenes show protected animals and animal meat for sale in the market and medicine made from rare snakes. This pristine river and massive rainforest is under threat from infrastructure development in Peru. The Achuar Indian people of this Northern region recently won a legal battle with Argentinian Oil giant PlusPetrol to stop them dumping waste oil water, so called "hot-water" into their water supply. The amount is estimated at around 500 000 barrels a day over a period of 30 years. This has played havoc with the eco-systems around the town of Trompeteros. The oil company has yet to make good on its promises for payment and transparency. The oil company provides the bulk of employment for the polluted town of Trompeteros and thus has the local Achuan population under pressure to not pay attention to the pollution levels. The Achuan people are faced with a choice between a centuries old sustainable lifestyle in harmony with the environment or a move towards increased devastation of their natural lands in the Amazon basin by the oil industry. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

IQUITOS, PERU-JUNE 2007: Images of rare animals from the zoo in the Amazonian town of Iquitos, Peru, 11 June 2007. The Amazon is a pristine river and the massive rainforest is under threat from infrastructure development in Peru. The Achuar Indian people of this Northern region recently won a legal battle with Argentinian Oil giant PlusPetrol to stop them dumping waste oil water, so called "hot-water" into their water supply. The amount is estimated at around 500 000 barrels a day over a period of 30 years. This has played havoc with the eco-systems around the town of Trompeteros. The oil company has yet to make good on its promises for payment and transparency. The oil company provides the bulk of employment for the polluted town of Trompeteros and thus has the local Achuan population under pressure to not pay attention to the pollution levels. The Achuan people are faced with a choice between a centuries old sustainable lifestyle in harmony with the environment or a move towards increased devastation of their natural lands in the Amazon basin by the oil industry. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

SORAYPAMPA, PERU, JUNE 2007: The trek continues over its highest pass called Salcantayccasa, 4650 meters high, Soraypampa, Peru, 27 June 2007. The pass is a series of steep right angle ascents on the mountain and saw heavy traffic from many European and Israeli hikers. An Israeli girl stopped at the top to play a breathless harmonica recital. The top of the pass is a breath-taking view with many cairns in the area which the locals have placed there for safe passage. The pass winds down into a wide valley with high mountains all around and a river running through the middle. This hidden valley is called Wayraccmachay and is located at 3800 meters. (photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

SORAYPAMPA, PERU, JUNE 2007: The trek continues over its highest pass called Salcantayccasa, 4650 meters high, Soraypampa, Peru, 27 June 2007. The pass is a series of steep right angle ascents on the mountain and saw heavy traffic from many European and Israeli hikers. An Israeli girl stopped at the top to play a breathless harmonica recital. The top of the pass is a breath-taking view with many cairns in the area which the locals have placed there for safe passage. The pass winds down into a wide valley with high mountains all around and a river running through the middle. This hidden valley is called Wayraccmachay and is located at 3800 meters. (photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

PATAWASI, THE ANDES, PERU-JUNE 2007: A glacial valley formed over thousands of years high in the Andean mountains, Patawasi, Peru, 21 June 2007. Glaciers in Peru are in severe retreat as a result of global warming. Peruvians are highly dependant on glacial water supply and the majority of the population lives in an area where this is the majority water source. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

PATAWASI, THE ANDES, PERU-JUNE 2007: Images of poor rural people living high up in the Andes, farming with both sheep and llamas, Patawasi, Peru, 21 June 2007. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

COLLPAPAMPA, PERU, JUNE 2007: The trek follows the Santa Teresa river in the cloud forest through Coffee, Banana and Passion Fruit plantations, Collpapampa, Peru, 29 June 2007. We see local people, a few Brazilian tourists, kiosks along the way with locals and children. River swimming is possible in icy glacial rivers. All along the way, mule trains and horses ply the path with water, tourist baggage and goods. We walked through the town of Playa where we were able to see the small tent cities of the young trekkers travelling on a budget. The trek concluded today at the start of the Inca trail, at the Lucma Lodge at 2100m. (photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

THE ANDES, PERU-JUNE 2007: Images of the Andes along the route of the construction of the Inter-Oceanica highway through the Andes from Cuzco into the Andes, Cuzco, Peru, 14 June 2007. The building of the Inter-Oceanica Highway road has had many effects on Peru. One of the longest, most ambitious road projects in the world, it crosses Peru through the Amazon rain forest regions and continues through the Andes into Brazil. It provides the potential for great economic growth for Peru through improved transportation routes which ease the need for imports in Peru. The road however threatens the fragile eco-systems through which it passes, and that threatens much of the sustainable, subsistence existence of many Peruvians. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

THE ANDES, PERU-JUNE 2007: Images of the construction of the Inter-Oceanica highway through the Andes from Cuzco into the Andes, Cuzco, Peru, 14 June 2007. The building of the Inter-Oceanica Highway road has had many effects on Peru. One of the longest, most ambitious road projects in the world, it crosses Peru through the Amazon rain forest regions and continues through the Andes into Brazil. It provides the potential for great economic growth for Peru through improved transportation routes which ease the need for imports in Peru. The road however threatens the fragile eco-systems through which it passes, and that threatens much of the sustainable, subsistence existence of many Peruvians. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

THE ANDES, PERU-JUNE 2007: Images of the construction of the Inter-Oceanica highway through the Andes from Cuzco into the Andes, Cuzco, Peru, 14 June 2007. The building of the Inter-Oceanica Highway road has had many effects on Peru. One of the longest, most ambitious road projects in the world, it crosses Peru through the Amazon rain forest regions and continues through the Andes into Brazil. It provides the potential for great economic growth for Peru through improved transportation routes which ease the need for imports in Peru. The road however threatens the fragile eco-systems through which it passes, and that threatens much of the sustainable, subsistence existence of many Peruvians. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

THE ANDES, PERU-JUNE 2007: Images of the Andes, Peru, 14 June 2007. The building of the Inter-Oceanica Highway road has had many effects on Peru. One of the longest, most ambitious road projects in the world, it crosses Peru through the Amazon rain forest regions and continues through the Andes into Brazil. It provides the potential for great economic growth for Peru through improved transportation routes which ease the need for imports in Peru. The road however threatens the fragile eco-systems through which it passes, and that threatens much of the sustainable, subsistence existence of many Peruvians. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

MAZUCO, PERU-JUNE 2007: Images of the ongoing construction of the Inter-Oceanica highway, Mazuco, Peru, 15 June 2007. The building of the Inter-Oceanica Highway road has had many effects on Peru. One of the longest, most ambitious road projects in the world, it crosses Peru through the Amazon rain forest regions and continues through the Andes into Brazil. It provides the potential for great economic growth for Peru through improved transportation routes which ease the need for imports in Peru. The road however threatens the fragile eco-systems through which it passes, and that threatens much of the sustainable, subsistence existence of many Peruvians. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

MAZUCO, PERU-JUNE 2007: Images of the ongoing construction of the Inter-Oceanica highway, Mazuco, Peru, 15 June 2007. The building of the Inter-Oceanica Highway road has had many effects on Peru. One of the longest, most ambitious road projects in the world, it crosses Peru through the Amazon rain forest regions and continues through the Andes into Brazil. It provides the potential for great economic growth for Peru through improved transportation routes which ease the need for imports in Peru. The road however threatens the fragile eco-systems through which it passes, and that threatens much of the sustainable, subsistence existence of many Peruvians. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

PERU-BRAZIL BORDER AREA, PERU-JUNE 2007: Images of Brazil nut farming and sorting, Peru-Brazil border area, 16 June 2007. The Brazil nuts are harvested from giant trees and then left to cure before the nut is extracted. The building of the Inter-Oceanica Highway road has had many effects on Peru. One of the longest, most ambitious road projects in the world, it crosses Peru through the Amazon rain forest regions and continues through the Andes into Brazil. It provides the potential for great economic growth for Peru through improved transportation routes which ease the need for imports in Peru. The road however threatens the fragile eco-systems through which it passes, and that threatens much of the sustainable, subsistence existence of many Peruvians. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

MAZUCO, PERU-JUNE 2007: A local man bathes his daughter in a river while behind them is the ongoing construction of the Inter-Oceanica highway, Peru, 15 June 2007. The building of the Inter-Oceanica Highway road has had many effects on Peru. One of the longest, most ambitious road projects in the world, it crosses Peru through the Amazon rain forest regions and continues through the Andes into Brazil. It provides the potential for great economic growth for Peru through improved transportation routes which ease the need for imports in Peru. The road however threatens the fragile eco-systems through which it passes, and that threatens much of the sustainable, subsistence existence of many Peruvians. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

LIMA, PERU-JUNE 2007: Images from the poor areas of sprawling Lima illustrating the urban drift issue as rural people make their way to an already overcrowded city with insufficent funds and infrastructure, Lima, Peru, 7 June 2007. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

 IQUITOS, PERU-JUNE 2007: Scenes on the Northern Peruvian Amazon River from the  town of Nauta to the town of Trometeros, Peru, 8 June 2007. This pristine river and massive rainforest is under threat from infrastructure development in Peru. The Achuar Indian people of this Northern region recently won a legal battle with Argentinian Oil giant PlusPetrol to stop them dumping waste oil water, so called "hot-water" into their water supply. The amount is estimated at around 500 000 barrels a day over a period of 30 years. This has played havoc with the eco-systems around the town of Trompeteros. The oil company has yet to make good on its promises for payment and transparency. The oil company provides the bulk of employment for the polluted town of Trompeteros and thus has the local Achuan population under pressure to not pay attention to the pollution levels. The Achuan people are faced with a choice between a centuries old sustainable lifestyle in harmony with the environment or a move towards increased devastation of their natural lands in the Amazon basin by the oil industry. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 IQUITOS, PERU-JUNE 2007: Riverside scenes from the Amazonian town of Nauta to the oil town of Trometeros, Peru, 8 June 2007. This pristine river and massive rainforest is under threat from infrastructure development in Peru. The Achuar Indian people of this Northern region recently won a legal battle with Argentinian Oil giant PlusPetrol to stop them dumping waste oil water, so called "hot-water" into their water supply. The amount is estimated at around 500 000 barrels a day over a period of 30 years. This has played havoc with the eco-systems around the town of Trompeteros. The oil company has yet to make good on its promises for payment and transparency. The oil company provides the bulk of employment for the polluted town of Trompeteros and thus has the local Achuan population under pressure to not pay attention to the pollution levels. The Achuan people are faced with a choice between a centuries old sustainable lifestyle in harmony with the environment or a move towards increased devastation of their natural lands in the Amazon basin by the oil industry. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 IQUITOS, PERU-JUNE 2007: People and scenes in a riverside village on the Northern Amazon river, Peru, 8 June 2007. This pristine river and massive rainforest is under threat from infrastructure development in Peru. The Achuar Indian people of this Northern region recently won a legal battle with Argentinian Oil giant PlusPetrol to stop them dumping waste oil water, so called "hot-water" into their water supply. The amount is estimated at around 500 000 barrels a day over a period of 30 years. This has played havoc with the eco-systems around the town of Trompeteros. The oil company has yet to make good on its promises for payment and transparency. The oil company provides the bulk of employment for the polluted town of Trompeteros and thus has the local Achuan population under pressure to not pay attention to the pollution levels. The Achuan people are faced with a choice between a centuries old sustainable lifestyle in harmony with the environment or a move towards increased devastation of their natural lands in the Amazon basin by the oil industry. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 IQUITOS, PERU-JUNE 2007: Scenes from the Amazon river oil town of Trometeros, Peru, 8 June 2007. A bar in the town exhibits two Jaguar skins on its walls as well as Anaconda and Boa Constrictor skins. All of these are highly protected species and skins are illegal. This pristine river and massive rainforest is under threat from infrastructure development in Peru. The Achuar Indian people of this Northern region recently won a legal battle with Argentinian Oil giant PlusPetrol to stop them dumping waste oil water, so called "hot-water" into their water supply. The amount is estimated at around 500 000 barrels a day over a period of 30 years. This has played havoc with the eco-systems around the town of Trompeteros. The oil company has yet to make good on its promises for payment and transparency. The oil company provides the bulk of employment for the polluted town of Trompeteros and thus has the local Achuan population under pressure to not pay attention to the pollution levels. The Achuan people are faced with a choice between a centuries old sustainable lifestyle in harmony with the environment or a move towards increased devastation of their natural lands in the Amazon basin by the oil industry. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 IQUITOS, PERU-JUNE 2007: Scenes from the Amazon river oil town of Trometeros, Peru, 8 June 2007. A bar in the town exhibits two Jaguar skins on its walls as well as Anaconda and Boa Constrictor skins. All of these are highly protected species and skins are illegal. This pristine river and massive rainforest is under threat from infrastructure development in Peru. The Achuar Indian people of this Northern region recently won a legal battle with Argentinian Oil giant PlusPetrol to stop them dumping waste oil water, so called "hot-water" into their water supply. The amount is estimated at around 500 000 barrels a day over a period of 30 years. This has played havoc with the eco-systems around the town of Trompeteros. The oil company has yet to make good on its promises for payment and transparency. The oil company provides the bulk of employment for the polluted town of Trompeteros and thus has the local Achuan population under pressure to not pay attention to the pollution levels. The Achuan people are faced with a choice between a centuries old sustainable lifestyle in harmony with the environment or a move towards increased devastation of their natural lands in the Amazon basin by the oil industry. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 IQUITOS, PERU-JUNE 2007: Scenes from local riverside village homes, schools and fishing practises on the Northern Peruvian Amazon River from the  town of Nauta to the town of Trometeros, Peru, 8 June 2007. This pristine river and massive rainforest is under threat from infrastructure development in Peru. The Achuar Indian people of this Northern region recently won a legal battle with Argentinian Oil giant PlusPetrol to stop them dumping waste oil water, so called "hot-water" into their water supply. The amount is estimated at around 500 000 barrels a day over a period of 30 years. This has played havoc with the eco-systems around the town of Trompeteros. The oil company has yet to make good on its promises for payment and transparency. The oil company provides the bulk of employment for the polluted town of Trompeteros and thus has the local Achuan population under pressure to not pay attention to the pollution levels. The Achuan people are faced with a choice between a centuries old sustainable lifestyle in harmony with the environment or a move towards increased devastation of their natural lands in the Amazon basin by the oil industry. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 IQUITOS, PERU-JUNE 2007: Scenes from local riverside village homes, schools and fishing practises on the Northern Peruvian Amazon River from the  town of Nauta to the town of Trometeros, Peru, 8 June 2007. This pristine river and massive rainforest is under threat from infrastructure development in Peru. The Achuar Indian people of this Northern region recently won a legal battle with Argentinian Oil giant PlusPetrol to stop them dumping waste oil water, so called "hot-water" into their water supply. The amount is estimated at around 500 000 barrels a day over a period of 30 years. This has played havoc with the eco-systems around the town of Trompeteros. The oil company has yet to make good on its promises for payment and transparency. The oil company provides the bulk of employment for the polluted town of Trompeteros and thus has the local Achuan population under pressure to not pay attention to the pollution levels. The Achuan people are faced with a choice between a centuries old sustainable lifestyle in harmony with the environment or a move towards increased devastation of their natural lands in the Amazon basin by the oil industry. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 NORTHERN AMAZON, PERU-JUNE 2007: Aerial scenes from the Northern Amazon from the town of Iqitos to the Amazon oil town of Trompederos, Peru, 11 June 2007. The scenes show pristine forest as well as the impact of roads into the forest, roadside urbanisation and the effects of that. The images also show the oil town of Trompederos. Scenes there depict the industry of Petroplus, an Argentine oil company and the effect it has on the forest and the pipeline leading thorugh it. The Amazon is a pristine river and massive rainforest is under threat from infrastructure development in Peru. The Achuar Indian people of this Northern region recently won a legal battle with Argentinian Oil giant PlusPetrol to stop them dumping waste oil water, so called "hot-water" into their water supply. The amount is estimated at around 500 000 barrels a day over a period of 30 years. This has played havoc with the eco-systems around the town of Trompeteros. The oil company has yet to make good on its promises for payment and transparency. The oil company provides the bulk of employment for the polluted town of Trompeteros and thus has the local Achuan population under pressure to not pay attention to the pollution levels. The Achuan people are faced with a choice between a centuries old sustainable lifestyle in harmony with the environment or a move towards increased devastation of their natural lands in the Amazon basin by the oil industry. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 NORTHERN AMAZON, PERU-JUNE 2007: Aerial scenes from the Northern Amazon from the town of Iqitos to the Amazon oil town of Trompederos, Peru, 11 June 2007. The scenes show pristine forest as well as the impact of roads into the forest, roadside urbanisation and the effects of that. The images also show the oil town of Trompederos. Scenes there depict the industry of Petroplus, an Argentine oil company and the effect it has on the forest and the pipeline leading thorugh it. The Amazon is a pristine river and massive rainforest is under threat from infrastructure development in Peru. The Achuar Indian people of this Northern region recently won a legal battle with Argentinian Oil giant PlusPetrol to stop them dumping waste oil water, so called "hot-water" into their water supply. The amount is estimated at around 500 000 barrels a day over a period of 30 years. This has played havoc with the eco-systems around the town of Trompeteros. The oil company has yet to make good on its promises for payment and transparency. The oil company provides the bulk of employment for the polluted town of Trompeteros and thus has the local Achuan population under pressure to not pay attention to the pollution levels. The Achuan people are faced with a choice between a centuries old sustainable lifestyle in harmony with the environment or a move towards increased devastation of their natural lands in the Amazon basin by the oil industry. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 NORTHERN AMAZON, PERU-JUNE 2007: Aerial scenes from the Northern Amazon from the town of Iqitos to the Amazon oil town of Trompederos, Peru, 11 June 2007. The scenes show pristine forest as well as the impact of roads into the forest, roadside urbanisation and the effects of that. The images also show the oil town of Trompederos. Scenes there depict the industry of Petroplus, an Argentine oil company and the effect it has on the forest and the pipeline leading thorugh it. The Amazon is a pristine river and massive rainforest is under threat from infrastructure development in Peru. The Achuar Indian people of this Northern region recently won a legal battle with Argentinian Oil giant PlusPetrol to stop them dumping waste oil water, so called "hot-water" into their water supply. The amount is estimated at around 500 000 barrels a day over a period of 30 years. This has played havoc with the eco-systems around the town of Trompeteros. The oil company has yet to make good on its promises for payment and transparency. The oil company provides the bulk of employment for the polluted town of Trompeteros and thus has the local Achuan population under pressure to not pay attention to the pollution levels. The Achuan people are faced with a choice between a centuries old sustainable lifestyle in harmony with the environment or a move towards increased devastation of their natural lands in the Amazon basin by the oil industry. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 PUERTO MOLDONADO, PERU-JUNE 2007:  Images of the construction of the Inter-Oceanica highway through the Andes from Cuzco into the Andes, Cuzco, Peru, 14 June 2007. The building of the Inter-Oceanica Highway road has had many effects on Peru. One of the longest, most ambitious road projects in the world, it crosses Peru through the Amazon rain forest regions and continues through the Andes into Brazil. It provides the potential for great economic growth for Peru through improved transportation routes which ease the need for imports in Peru. The road however threatens the fragile eco-systems through which it passes, and that threatens much of the sustainable, subsistence existence of many Peruvians. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 IQUITOS, PERU-JUNE 2007: Illegal timber being cut in a riverside village on the Northern Amazon river, Peru, 8 June 2007. This pristine river and massive rainforest is under threat from infrastructure development in Peru. The Achuar Indian people of this Northern region recently won a legal battle with Argentinian Oil giant PlusPetrol to stop them dumping waste oil water, so called "hot-water" into their water supply. The amount is estimated at around 500 000 barrels a day over a period of 30 years. This has played havoc with the eco-systems around the town of Trompeteros. The oil company has yet to make good on its promises for payment and transparency. The oil company provides the bulk of employment for the polluted town of Trompeteros and thus has the local Achuan population under pressure to not pay attention to the pollution levels. The Achuan people are faced with a choice between a centuries old sustainable lifestyle in harmony with the environment or a move towards increased devastation of their natural lands in the Amazon basin by the oil industry. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 IQUITOS, PERU-JUNE 2007: Scenes from a large plastic dumping ground cum primitive recycling area on the road from the Peruvian city of Iquitos to the town of Nauta, located alongside the Amazon river, Peru, 8 June 2007. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 IQUITOS, PERU-JUNE 2007: Traditonal market scenes on the Northern Amazon river town, Iquitos, Peru, 8 June 2007. The scenes show protected animals and animal meat for sale in the market and medicine made from rare snakes. This pristine river and massive rainforest is under threat from infrastructure development in Peru. The Achuar Indian people of this Northern region recently won a legal battle with Argentinian Oil giant PlusPetrol to stop them dumping waste oil water, so called "hot-water" into their water supply. The amount is estimated at around 500 000 barrels a day over a period of 30 years. This has played havoc with the eco-systems around the town of Trompeteros. The oil company has yet to make good on its promises for payment and transparency. The oil company provides the bulk of employment for the polluted town of Trompeteros and thus has the local Achuan population under pressure to not pay attention to the pollution levels. The Achuan people are faced with a choice between a centuries old sustainable lifestyle in harmony with the environment or a move towards increased devastation of their natural lands in the Amazon basin by the oil industry. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 IQUITOS, PERU-JUNE 2007: Traditonal market scenes on the Northern Amazon river town, Iquitos, Peru, 8 June 2007. The scenes show protected animals and animal meat for sale in the market and medicine made from rare snakes. This pristine river and massive rainforest is under threat from infrastructure development in Peru. The Achuar Indian people of this Northern region recently won a legal battle with Argentinian Oil giant PlusPetrol to stop them dumping waste oil water, so called "hot-water" into their water supply. The amount is estimated at around 500 000 barrels a day over a period of 30 years. This has played havoc with the eco-systems around the town of Trompeteros. The oil company has yet to make good on its promises for payment and transparency. The oil company provides the bulk of employment for the polluted town of Trompeteros and thus has the local Achuan population under pressure to not pay attention to the pollution levels. The Achuan people are faced with a choice between a centuries old sustainable lifestyle in harmony with the environment or a move towards increased devastation of their natural lands in the Amazon basin by the oil industry. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 IQUITOS, PERU-JUNE 2007: Images of rare animals from the zoo in the Amazonian town of Iquitos, Peru, 11 June 2007.  The Amazon is a pristine river and the massive rainforest is under threat from infrastructure development in Peru. The Achuar Indian people of this Northern region recently won a legal battle with Argentinian Oil giant PlusPetrol to stop them dumping waste oil water, so called "hot-water" into their water supply. The amount is estimated at around 500 000 barrels a day over a period of 30 years. This has played havoc with the eco-systems around the town of Trompeteros. The oil company has yet to make good on its promises for payment and transparency. The oil company provides the bulk of employment for the polluted town of Trompeteros and thus has the local Achuan population under pressure to not pay attention to the pollution levels. The Achuan people are faced with a choice between a centuries old sustainable lifestyle in harmony with the environment or a move towards increased devastation of their natural lands in the Amazon basin by the oil industry. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 SORAYPAMPA, PERU, JUNE 2007: The trek continues over its highest pass called Salcantayccasa, 4650 meters high, Soraypampa, Peru, 27 June 2007. The pass is a series of steep right angle ascents on the mountain and saw heavy traffic from many European and Israeli hikers. An Israeli girl stopped at the top to play a breathless harmonica recital. The top of the pass is a breath-taking view with many cairns in the area which the locals have placed there for safe passage. The pass winds down into a wide valley with high mountains all around and a river running through the middle. This hidden valley is called Wayraccmachay and is located at 3800 meters. (photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 SORAYPAMPA, PERU, JUNE 2007: The trek continues over its highest pass called Salcantayccasa, 4650 meters high, Soraypampa, Peru, 27 June 2007. The pass is a series of steep right angle ascents on the mountain and saw heavy traffic from many European and Israeli hikers. An Israeli girl stopped at the top to play a breathless harmonica recital. The top of the pass is a breath-taking view with many cairns in the area which the locals have placed there for safe passage. The pass winds down into a wide valley with high mountains all around and a river running through the middle. This hidden valley is called Wayraccmachay and is located at 3800 meters. (photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 PATAWASI, THE ANDES, PERU-JUNE 2007: A glacial valley formed over thousands of years high in the Andean mountains, Patawasi, Peru, 21 June 2007. Glaciers in Peru are in severe retreat as a result of global warming. Peruvians are highly dependant on glacial water supply and the majority of the population lives in an area where this is the majority water source.  (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 PATAWASI, THE ANDES, PERU-JUNE 2007: Images of poor rural people living high up in the Andes, farming with both sheep and llamas, Patawasi, Peru, 21 June 2007. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 COLLPAPAMPA, PERU, JUNE 2007: The trek follows the Santa Teresa river in the cloud forest through Coffee, Banana and Passion Fruit plantations, Collpapampa, Peru, 29 June 2007.  We see local people, a few Brazilian tourists, kiosks along the way with locals and children. River swimming is possible in icy glacial rivers. All along the way, mule trains and horses ply the path with water, tourist baggage and goods. We walked through the town of Playa where we were able to see the small tent cities of the young trekkers travelling on a budget. The trek concluded today at the start of the Inca trail, at the Lucma Lodge at 2100m. (photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 THE ANDES, PERU-JUNE 2007:  Images of the Andes along the route of the construction of the Inter-Oceanica highway through the Andes from Cuzco into the Andes, Cuzco, Peru, 14 June 2007. The building of the Inter-Oceanica Highway road has had many effects on Peru. One of the longest, most ambitious road projects in the world, it crosses Peru through the Amazon rain forest regions and continues through the Andes into Brazil. It provides the potential for great economic growth for Peru through improved transportation routes which ease the need for imports in Peru. The road however threatens the fragile eco-systems through which it passes, and that threatens much of the sustainable, subsistence existence of many Peruvians. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 THE ANDES, PERU-JUNE 2007:  Images of the construction of the Inter-Oceanica highway through the Andes from Cuzco into the Andes, Cuzco, Peru, 14 June 2007. The building of the Inter-Oceanica Highway road has had many effects on Peru. One of the longest, most ambitious road projects in the world, it crosses Peru through the Amazon rain forest regions and continues through the Andes into Brazil. It provides the potential for great economic growth for Peru through improved transportation routes which ease the need for imports in Peru. The road however threatens the fragile eco-systems through which it passes, and that threatens much of the sustainable, subsistence existence of many Peruvians. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 THE ANDES, PERU-JUNE 2007:  Images of the construction of the Inter-Oceanica highway through the Andes from Cuzco into the Andes, Cuzco, Peru, 14 June 2007. The building of the Inter-Oceanica Highway road has had many effects on Peru. One of the longest, most ambitious road projects in the world, it crosses Peru through the Amazon rain forest regions and continues through the Andes into Brazil. It provides the potential for great economic growth for Peru through improved transportation routes which ease the need for imports in Peru. The road however threatens the fragile eco-systems through which it passes, and that threatens much of the sustainable, subsistence existence of many Peruvians. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 THE ANDES, PERU-JUNE 2007: Images of the Andes, Peru, 14 June 2007. The building of the Inter-Oceanica Highway road has had many effects on Peru. One of the longest, most ambitious road projects in the world, it crosses Peru through the Amazon rain forest regions and continues through the Andes into Brazil. It provides the potential for great economic growth for Peru through improved transportation routes which ease the need for imports in Peru. The road however threatens the fragile eco-systems through which it passes, and that threatens much of the sustainable, subsistence existence of many Peruvians. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 MAZUCO, PERU-JUNE 2007: Images of the ongoing construction of the Inter-Oceanica highway, Mazuco, Peru, 15 June 2007. The building of the Inter-Oceanica Highway road has had many effects on Peru. One of the longest, most ambitious road projects in the world, it crosses Peru through the Amazon rain forest regions and continues through the Andes into Brazil. It provides the potential for great economic growth for Peru through improved transportation routes which ease the need for imports in Peru. The road however threatens the fragile eco-systems through which it passes, and that threatens much of the sustainable, subsistence existence of many Peruvians. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 MAZUCO, PERU-JUNE 2007: Images of the ongoing construction of the Inter-Oceanica highway, Mazuco, Peru, 15 June 2007. The building of the Inter-Oceanica Highway road has had many effects on Peru. One of the longest, most ambitious road projects in the world, it crosses Peru through the Amazon rain forest regions and continues through the Andes into Brazil. It provides the potential for great economic growth for Peru through improved transportation routes which ease the need for imports in Peru. The road however threatens the fragile eco-systems through which it passes, and that threatens much of the sustainable, subsistence existence of many Peruvians. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 PERU-BRAZIL BORDER AREA, PERU-JUNE 2007:  Images of Brazil nut farming and sorting, Peru-Brazil border area, 16 June 2007. The Brazil nuts are harvested from giant trees and then left to cure before the nut is extracted. The building of the Inter-Oceanica Highway road has had many effects on Peru. One of the longest, most ambitious road projects in the world, it crosses Peru through the Amazon rain forest regions and continues through the Andes into Brazil. It provides the potential for great economic growth for Peru through improved transportation routes which ease the need for imports in Peru. The road however threatens the fragile eco-systems through which it passes, and that threatens much of the sustainable, subsistence existence of many Peruvians. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 MAZUCO, PERU-JUNE 2007: A local man bathes his daughter in a river while behind them is the ongoing construction of the Inter-Oceanica highway, Peru, 15 June 2007. The building of the Inter-Oceanica Highway road has had many effects on Peru. One of the longest, most ambitious road projects in the world, it crosses Peru through the Amazon rain forest regions and continues through the Andes into Brazil. It provides the potential for great economic growth for Peru through improved transportation routes which ease the need for imports in Peru. The road however threatens the fragile eco-systems through which it passes, and that threatens much of the sustainable, subsistence existence of many Peruvians. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)
 LIMA, PERU-JUNE 2007: Images from the poor areas of sprawling Lima illustrating the urban drift issue as rural people make their way to an already overcrowded city with insufficent funds and infrastructure, Lima, Peru, 7 June 2007. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

IQUITOS, PERU-JUNE 2007: Scenes on the Northern Peruvian Amazon River from the town of Nauta to the town of Trometeros, Peru, 8 June 2007. This pristine river and massive rainforest is under threat from infrastructure development in Peru. The Achuar Indian people of this Northern region recently won a legal battle with Argentinian Oil giant PlusPetrol to stop them dumping waste oil water, so called "hot-water" into their water supply. The amount is estimated at around 500 000 barrels a day over a period of 30 years. This has played havoc with the eco-systems around the town of Trompeteros. The oil company has yet to make good on its promises for payment and transparency. The oil company provides the bulk of employment for the polluted town of Trompeteros and thus has the local Achuan population under pressure to not pay attention to the pollution levels. The Achuan people are faced with a choice between a centuries old sustainable lifestyle in harmony with the environment or a move towards increased devastation of their natural lands in the Amazon basin by the oil industry. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

IQUITOS, PERU-JUNE 2007: Riverside scenes from the Amazonian town of Nauta to the oil town of Trometeros, Peru, 8 June 2007. This pristine river and massive rainforest is under threat from infrastructure development in Peru. The Achuar Indian people of this Northern region recently won a legal battle with Argentinian Oil giant PlusPetrol to stop them dumping waste oil water, so called "hot-water" into their water supply. The amount is estimated at around 500 000 barrels a day over a period of 30 years. This has played havoc with the eco-systems around the town of Trompeteros. The oil company has yet to make good on its promises for payment and transparency. The oil company provides the bulk of employment for the polluted town of Trompeteros and thus has the local Achuan population under pressure to not pay attention to the pollution levels. The Achuan people are faced with a choice between a centuries old sustainable lifestyle in harmony with the environment or a move towards increased devastation of their natural lands in the Amazon basin by the oil industry. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

IQUITOS, PERU-JUNE 2007: People and scenes in a riverside village on the Northern Amazon river, Peru, 8 June 2007. This pristine river and massive rainforest is under threat from infrastructure development in Peru. The Achuar Indian people of this Northern region recently won a legal battle with Argentinian Oil giant PlusPetrol to stop them dumping waste oil water, so called "hot-water" into their water supply. The amount is estimated at around 500 000 barrels a day over a period of 30 years. This has played havoc with the eco-systems around the town of Trompeteros. The oil company has yet to make good on its promises for payment and transparency. The oil company provides the bulk of employment for the polluted town of Trompeteros and thus has the local Achuan population under pressure to not pay attention to the pollution levels. The Achuan people are faced with a choice between a centuries old sustainable lifestyle in harmony with the environment or a move towards increased devastation of their natural lands in the Amazon basin by the oil industry. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

IQUITOS, PERU-JUNE 2007: Scenes from the Amazon river oil town of Trometeros, Peru, 8 June 2007. A bar in the town exhibits two Jaguar skins on its walls as well as Anaconda and Boa Constrictor skins. All of these are highly protected species and skins are illegal. This pristine river and massive rainforest is under threat from infrastructure development in Peru. The Achuar Indian people of this Northern region recently won a legal battle with Argentinian Oil giant PlusPetrol to stop them dumping waste oil water, so called "hot-water" into their water supply. The amount is estimated at around 500 000 barrels a day over a period of 30 years. This has played havoc with the eco-systems around the town of Trompeteros. The oil company has yet to make good on its promises for payment and transparency. The oil company provides the bulk of employment for the polluted town of Trompeteros and thus has the local Achuan population under pressure to not pay attention to the pollution levels. The Achuan people are faced with a choice between a centuries old sustainable lifestyle in harmony with the environment or a move towards increased devastation of their natural lands in the Amazon basin by the oil industry. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

IQUITOS, PERU-JUNE 2007: Scenes from the Amazon river oil town of Trometeros, Peru, 8 June 2007. A bar in the town exhibits two Jaguar skins on its walls as well as Anaconda and Boa Constrictor skins. All of these are highly protected species and skins are illegal. This pristine river and massive rainforest is under threat from infrastructure development in Peru. The Achuar Indian people of this Northern region recently won a legal battle with Argentinian Oil giant PlusPetrol to stop them dumping waste oil water, so called "hot-water" into their water supply. The amount is estimated at around 500 000 barrels a day over a period of 30 years. This has played havoc with the eco-systems around the town of Trompeteros. The oil company has yet to make good on its promises for payment and transparency. The oil company provides the bulk of employment for the polluted town of Trompeteros and thus has the local Achuan population under pressure to not pay attention to the pollution levels. The Achuan people are faced with a choice between a centuries old sustainable lifestyle in harmony with the environment or a move towards increased devastation of their natural lands in the Amazon basin by the oil industry. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

IQUITOS, PERU-JUNE 2007: Scenes from local riverside village homes, schools and fishing practises on the Northern Peruvian Amazon River from the town of Nauta to the town of Trometeros, Peru, 8 June 2007. This pristine river and massive rainforest is under threat from infrastructure development in Peru. The Achuar Indian people of this Northern region recently won a legal battle with Argentinian Oil giant PlusPetrol to stop them dumping waste oil water, so called "hot-water" into their water supply. The amount is estimated at around 500 000 barrels a day over a period of 30 years. This has played havoc with the eco-systems around the town of Trompeteros. The oil company has yet to make good on its promises for payment and transparency. The oil company provides the bulk of employment for the polluted town of Trompeteros and thus has the local Achuan population under pressure to not pay attention to the pollution levels. The Achuan people are faced with a choice between a centuries old sustainable lifestyle in harmony with the environment or a move towards increased devastation of their natural lands in the Amazon basin by the oil industry. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

IQUITOS, PERU-JUNE 2007: Scenes from local riverside village homes, schools and fishing practises on the Northern Peruvian Amazon River from the town of Nauta to the town of Trometeros, Peru, 8 June 2007. This pristine river and massive rainforest is under threat from infrastructure development in Peru. The Achuar Indian people of this Northern region recently won a legal battle with Argentinian Oil giant PlusPetrol to stop them dumping waste oil water, so called "hot-water" into their water supply. The amount is estimated at around 500 000 barrels a day over a period of 30 years. This has played havoc with the eco-systems around the town of Trompeteros. The oil company has yet to make good on its promises for payment and transparency. The oil company provides the bulk of employment for the polluted town of Trompeteros and thus has the local Achuan population under pressure to not pay attention to the pollution levels. The Achuan people are faced with a choice between a centuries old sustainable lifestyle in harmony with the environment or a move towards increased devastation of their natural lands in the Amazon basin by the oil industry. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

NORTHERN AMAZON, PERU-JUNE 2007: Aerial scenes from the Northern Amazon from the town of Iqitos to the Amazon oil town of Trompederos, Peru, 11 June 2007. The scenes show pristine forest as well as the impact of roads into the forest, roadside urbanisation and the effects of that. The images also show the oil town of Trompederos. Scenes there depict the industry of Petroplus, an Argentine oil company and the effect it has on the forest and the pipeline leading thorugh it. The Amazon is a pristine river and massive rainforest is under threat from infrastructure development in Peru. The Achuar Indian people of this Northern region recently won a legal battle with Argentinian Oil giant PlusPetrol to stop them dumping waste oil water, so called "hot-water" into their water supply. The amount is estimated at around 500 000 barrels a day over a period of 30 years. This has played havoc with the eco-systems around the town of Trompeteros. The oil company has yet to make good on its promises for payment and transparency. The oil company provides the bulk of employment for the polluted town of Trompeteros and thus has the local Achuan population under pressure to not pay attention to the pollution levels. The Achuan people are faced with a choice between a centuries old sustainable lifestyle in harmony with the environment or a move towards increased devastation of their natural lands in the Amazon basin by the oil industry. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

NORTHERN AMAZON, PERU-JUNE 2007: Aerial scenes from the Northern Amazon from the town of Iqitos to the Amazon oil town of Trompederos, Peru, 11 June 2007. The scenes show pristine forest as well as the impact of roads into the forest, roadside urbanisation and the effects of that. The images also show the oil town of Trompederos. Scenes there depict the industry of Petroplus, an Argentine oil company and the effect it has on the forest and the pipeline leading thorugh it. The Amazon is a pristine river and massive rainforest is under threat from infrastructure development in Peru. The Achuar Indian people of this Northern region recently won a legal battle with Argentinian Oil giant PlusPetrol to stop them dumping waste oil water, so called "hot-water" into their water supply. The amount is estimated at around 500 000 barrels a day over a period of 30 years. This has played havoc with the eco-systems around the town of Trompeteros. The oil company has yet to make good on its promises for payment and transparency. The oil company provides the bulk of employment for the polluted town of Trompeteros and thus has the local Achuan population under pressure to not pay attention to the pollution levels. The Achuan people are faced with a choice between a centuries old sustainable lifestyle in harmony with the environment or a move towards increased devastation of their natural lands in the Amazon basin by the oil industry. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

NORTHERN AMAZON, PERU-JUNE 2007: Aerial scenes from the Northern Amazon from the town of Iqitos to the Amazon oil town of Trompederos, Peru, 11 June 2007. The scenes show pristine forest as well as the impact of roads into the forest, roadside urbanisation and the effects of that. The images also show the oil town of Trompederos. Scenes there depict the industry of Petroplus, an Argentine oil company and the effect it has on the forest and the pipeline leading thorugh it. The Amazon is a pristine river and massive rainforest is under threat from infrastructure development in Peru. The Achuar Indian people of this Northern region recently won a legal battle with Argentinian Oil giant PlusPetrol to stop them dumping waste oil water, so called "hot-water" into their water supply. The amount is estimated at around 500 000 barrels a day over a period of 30 years. This has played havoc with the eco-systems around the town of Trompeteros. The oil company has yet to make good on its promises for payment and transparency. The oil company provides the bulk of employment for the polluted town of Trompeteros and thus has the local Achuan population under pressure to not pay attention to the pollution levels. The Achuan people are faced with a choice between a centuries old sustainable lifestyle in harmony with the environment or a move towards increased devastation of their natural lands in the Amazon basin by the oil industry. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

PUERTO MOLDONADO, PERU-JUNE 2007: Images of the construction of the Inter-Oceanica highway through the Andes from Cuzco into the Andes, Cuzco, Peru, 14 June 2007. The building of the Inter-Oceanica Highway road has had many effects on Peru. One of the longest, most ambitious road projects in the world, it crosses Peru through the Amazon rain forest regions and continues through the Andes into Brazil. It provides the potential for great economic growth for Peru through improved transportation routes which ease the need for imports in Peru. The road however threatens the fragile eco-systems through which it passes, and that threatens much of the sustainable, subsistence existence of many Peruvians. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

IQUITOS, PERU-JUNE 2007: Illegal timber being cut in a riverside village on the Northern Amazon river, Peru, 8 June 2007. This pristine river and massive rainforest is under threat from infrastructure development in Peru. The Achuar Indian people of this Northern region recently won a legal battle with Argentinian Oil giant PlusPetrol to stop them dumping waste oil water, so called "hot-water" into their water supply. The amount is estimated at around 500 000 barrels a day over a period of 30 years. This has played havoc with the eco-systems around the town of Trompeteros. The oil company has yet to make good on its promises for payment and transparency. The oil company provides the bulk of employment for the polluted town of Trompeteros and thus has the local Achuan population under pressure to not pay attention to the pollution levels. The Achuan people are faced with a choice between a centuries old sustainable lifestyle in harmony with the environment or a move towards increased devastation of their natural lands in the Amazon basin by the oil industry. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

IQUITOS, PERU-JUNE 2007: Scenes from a large plastic dumping ground cum primitive recycling area on the road from the Peruvian city of Iquitos to the town of Nauta, located alongside the Amazon river, Peru, 8 June 2007. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

IQUITOS, PERU-JUNE 2007: Traditonal market scenes on the Northern Amazon river town, Iquitos, Peru, 8 June 2007. The scenes show protected animals and animal meat for sale in the market and medicine made from rare snakes. This pristine river and massive rainforest is under threat from infrastructure development in Peru. The Achuar Indian people of this Northern region recently won a legal battle with Argentinian Oil giant PlusPetrol to stop them dumping waste oil water, so called "hot-water" into their water supply. The amount is estimated at around 500 000 barrels a day over a period of 30 years. This has played havoc with the eco-systems around the town of Trompeteros. The oil company has yet to make good on its promises for payment and transparency. The oil company provides the bulk of employment for the polluted town of Trompeteros and thus has the local Achuan population under pressure to not pay attention to the pollution levels. The Achuan people are faced with a choice between a centuries old sustainable lifestyle in harmony with the environment or a move towards increased devastation of their natural lands in the Amazon basin by the oil industry. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

IQUITOS, PERU-JUNE 2007: Traditonal market scenes on the Northern Amazon river town, Iquitos, Peru, 8 June 2007. The scenes show protected animals and animal meat for sale in the market and medicine made from rare snakes. This pristine river and massive rainforest is under threat from infrastructure development in Peru. The Achuar Indian people of this Northern region recently won a legal battle with Argentinian Oil giant PlusPetrol to stop them dumping waste oil water, so called "hot-water" into their water supply. The amount is estimated at around 500 000 barrels a day over a period of 30 years. This has played havoc with the eco-systems around the town of Trompeteros. The oil company has yet to make good on its promises for payment and transparency. The oil company provides the bulk of employment for the polluted town of Trompeteros and thus has the local Achuan population under pressure to not pay attention to the pollution levels. The Achuan people are faced with a choice between a centuries old sustainable lifestyle in harmony with the environment or a move towards increased devastation of their natural lands in the Amazon basin by the oil industry. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

IQUITOS, PERU-JUNE 2007: Images of rare animals from the zoo in the Amazonian town of Iquitos, Peru, 11 June 2007. The Amazon is a pristine river and the massive rainforest is under threat from infrastructure development in Peru. The Achuar Indian people of this Northern region recently won a legal battle with Argentinian Oil giant PlusPetrol to stop them dumping waste oil water, so called "hot-water" into their water supply. The amount is estimated at around 500 000 barrels a day over a period of 30 years. This has played havoc with the eco-systems around the town of Trompeteros. The oil company has yet to make good on its promises for payment and transparency. The oil company provides the bulk of employment for the polluted town of Trompeteros and thus has the local Achuan population under pressure to not pay attention to the pollution levels. The Achuan people are faced with a choice between a centuries old sustainable lifestyle in harmony with the environment or a move towards increased devastation of their natural lands in the Amazon basin by the oil industry. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

SORAYPAMPA, PERU, JUNE 2007: The trek continues over its highest pass called Salcantayccasa, 4650 meters high, Soraypampa, Peru, 27 June 2007. The pass is a series of steep right angle ascents on the mountain and saw heavy traffic from many European and Israeli hikers. An Israeli girl stopped at the top to play a breathless harmonica recital. The top of the pass is a breath-taking view with many cairns in the area which the locals have placed there for safe passage. The pass winds down into a wide valley with high mountains all around and a river running through the middle. This hidden valley is called Wayraccmachay and is located at 3800 meters. (photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

SORAYPAMPA, PERU, JUNE 2007: The trek continues over its highest pass called Salcantayccasa, 4650 meters high, Soraypampa, Peru, 27 June 2007. The pass is a series of steep right angle ascents on the mountain and saw heavy traffic from many European and Israeli hikers. An Israeli girl stopped at the top to play a breathless harmonica recital. The top of the pass is a breath-taking view with many cairns in the area which the locals have placed there for safe passage. The pass winds down into a wide valley with high mountains all around and a river running through the middle. This hidden valley is called Wayraccmachay and is located at 3800 meters. (photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

PATAWASI, THE ANDES, PERU-JUNE 2007: A glacial valley formed over thousands of years high in the Andean mountains, Patawasi, Peru, 21 June 2007. Glaciers in Peru are in severe retreat as a result of global warming. Peruvians are highly dependant on glacial water supply and the majority of the population lives in an area where this is the majority water source. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

PATAWASI, THE ANDES, PERU-JUNE 2007: Images of poor rural people living high up in the Andes, farming with both sheep and llamas, Patawasi, Peru, 21 June 2007. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

COLLPAPAMPA, PERU, JUNE 2007: The trek follows the Santa Teresa river in the cloud forest through Coffee, Banana and Passion Fruit plantations, Collpapampa, Peru, 29 June 2007. We see local people, a few Brazilian tourists, kiosks along the way with locals and children. River swimming is possible in icy glacial rivers. All along the way, mule trains and horses ply the path with water, tourist baggage and goods. We walked through the town of Playa where we were able to see the small tent cities of the young trekkers travelling on a budget. The trek concluded today at the start of the Inca trail, at the Lucma Lodge at 2100m. (photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

THE ANDES, PERU-JUNE 2007: Images of the Andes along the route of the construction of the Inter-Oceanica highway through the Andes from Cuzco into the Andes, Cuzco, Peru, 14 June 2007. The building of the Inter-Oceanica Highway road has had many effects on Peru. One of the longest, most ambitious road projects in the world, it crosses Peru through the Amazon rain forest regions and continues through the Andes into Brazil. It provides the potential for great economic growth for Peru through improved transportation routes which ease the need for imports in Peru. The road however threatens the fragile eco-systems through which it passes, and that threatens much of the sustainable, subsistence existence of many Peruvians. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

THE ANDES, PERU-JUNE 2007: Images of the construction of the Inter-Oceanica highway through the Andes from Cuzco into the Andes, Cuzco, Peru, 14 June 2007. The building of the Inter-Oceanica Highway road has had many effects on Peru. One of the longest, most ambitious road projects in the world, it crosses Peru through the Amazon rain forest regions and continues through the Andes into Brazil. It provides the potential for great economic growth for Peru through improved transportation routes which ease the need for imports in Peru. The road however threatens the fragile eco-systems through which it passes, and that threatens much of the sustainable, subsistence existence of many Peruvians. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

THE ANDES, PERU-JUNE 2007: Images of the construction of the Inter-Oceanica highway through the Andes from Cuzco into the Andes, Cuzco, Peru, 14 June 2007. The building of the Inter-Oceanica Highway road has had many effects on Peru. One of the longest, most ambitious road projects in the world, it crosses Peru through the Amazon rain forest regions and continues through the Andes into Brazil. It provides the potential for great economic growth for Peru through improved transportation routes which ease the need for imports in Peru. The road however threatens the fragile eco-systems through which it passes, and that threatens much of the sustainable, subsistence existence of many Peruvians. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

THE ANDES, PERU-JUNE 2007: Images of the Andes, Peru, 14 June 2007. The building of the Inter-Oceanica Highway road has had many effects on Peru. One of the longest, most ambitious road projects in the world, it crosses Peru through the Amazon rain forest regions and continues through the Andes into Brazil. It provides the potential for great economic growth for Peru through improved transportation routes which ease the need for imports in Peru. The road however threatens the fragile eco-systems through which it passes, and that threatens much of the sustainable, subsistence existence of many Peruvians. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

MAZUCO, PERU-JUNE 2007: Images of the ongoing construction of the Inter-Oceanica highway, Mazuco, Peru, 15 June 2007. The building of the Inter-Oceanica Highway road has had many effects on Peru. One of the longest, most ambitious road projects in the world, it crosses Peru through the Amazon rain forest regions and continues through the Andes into Brazil. It provides the potential for great economic growth for Peru through improved transportation routes which ease the need for imports in Peru. The road however threatens the fragile eco-systems through which it passes, and that threatens much of the sustainable, subsistence existence of many Peruvians. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

MAZUCO, PERU-JUNE 2007: Images of the ongoing construction of the Inter-Oceanica highway, Mazuco, Peru, 15 June 2007. The building of the Inter-Oceanica Highway road has had many effects on Peru. One of the longest, most ambitious road projects in the world, it crosses Peru through the Amazon rain forest regions and continues through the Andes into Brazil. It provides the potential for great economic growth for Peru through improved transportation routes which ease the need for imports in Peru. The road however threatens the fragile eco-systems through which it passes, and that threatens much of the sustainable, subsistence existence of many Peruvians. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

PERU-BRAZIL BORDER AREA, PERU-JUNE 2007: Images of Brazil nut farming and sorting, Peru-Brazil border area, 16 June 2007. The Brazil nuts are harvested from giant trees and then left to cure before the nut is extracted. The building of the Inter-Oceanica Highway road has had many effects on Peru. One of the longest, most ambitious road projects in the world, it crosses Peru through the Amazon rain forest regions and continues through the Andes into Brazil. It provides the potential for great economic growth for Peru through improved transportation routes which ease the need for imports in Peru. The road however threatens the fragile eco-systems through which it passes, and that threatens much of the sustainable, subsistence existence of many Peruvians. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

MAZUCO, PERU-JUNE 2007: A local man bathes his daughter in a river while behind them is the ongoing construction of the Inter-Oceanica highway, Peru, 15 June 2007. The building of the Inter-Oceanica Highway road has had many effects on Peru. One of the longest, most ambitious road projects in the world, it crosses Peru through the Amazon rain forest regions and continues through the Andes into Brazil. It provides the potential for great economic growth for Peru through improved transportation routes which ease the need for imports in Peru. The road however threatens the fragile eco-systems through which it passes, and that threatens much of the sustainable, subsistence existence of many Peruvians. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

LIMA, PERU-JUNE 2007: Images from the poor areas of sprawling Lima illustrating the urban drift issue as rural people make their way to an already overcrowded city with insufficent funds and infrastructure, Lima, Peru, 7 June 2007. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images.)

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