VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 11 DECEMBER 2016: Tshumelo “Killer” Makhado, 15, a young up and coming Musangwe fighter. Musangwe is traditional bare knuckle boxing which occurs in Venda every Xmas period. Killer is hoping to become a professional boxer but is busy with school and does not have the funds for a boxing gym in Venda. He has had 40 Musangwe bare knuckle fights and his record stands at 38-2. He is seen by the Musangwe community as a future senior champion and someone who could become a professional boxer one day. Killer is seen with trainer and Musangwe committee president, Poison, who is a teacher at a local school and long time Musangwe participant. Killer hits the punching bag the committee bought him, does shadow boxing and runs for fitness. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)

VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 11 DECEMBER 2016: Tshumelo “Killer” Makhado, 15, a young up and coming Musangwe fighter. Musangwe is traditional bare knuckle boxing which occurs in Venda every Xmas period. Killer is hoping to become a professional boxer but is busy with school and does not have the funds for a boxing gym in Venda. He has had 40 Musangwe bare knuckle fights and his record stands at 38-2. He is seen by the Musangwe community as a future senior champion and someone who could become a professional boxer one day. Killer is seen with trainer and Musangwe committee president, Poison, who is a teacher at a local school and long time Musangwe participant. Killer hits the punching bag the committee bought him, does shadow boxing and runs for fitness. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)

THOYANDO, VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 9 DECEMBER 2016: Steven Nditwani, 26, is one of two current senior champions in Venda's Musangwe fighting. This is an old sport practised by men in Venda and it has become a rite of passage for many Venda men, a way of displaying their courage in fronts of enthusiastic crowds over the Xmas period. Steven has been fighting since 2010 and won his first championship in 2013. The Venda people are superstitious and the fighters are no exception. Before a small fight Steven will rub a mixture of salt, child's urine and goat or pig fat on his body. Before a big fight, he will consult a traditional healer or Sangoma for a more potent solution. Most fights are not for money but when invited by the King or another VIP, fighters will perform for a pool of up to R40,000.00, the equivalent of $2,700.00. That money can be shared amongst as many as 20 fighters with the winner taking the lions share. Steve is seen doing pushups, hitting a puch bag made of a maize sack and with his brother Emmanuel. Steve likes to watch wrestling and boxing videos for inspiration, especially Mike Tyson and Muhammed Ali. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)

THOYANDO, VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 9 DECEMBER 2016: Steven Nditwani, 26, is one of two current senior champions in Venda's Musangwe fighting. This is an old sport practised by men in Venda and it has become a rite of passage for many Venda men, a way of displaying their courage in fronts of enthusiastic crowds over the Xmas period. Steven has been fighting since 2010 and won his first championship in 2013. The Venda people are superstitious and the fighters are no exception. Before a small fight Steven will rub a mixture of salt, child's urine and goat or pig fat on his body. Before a big fight, he will consult a traditional healer or Sangoma for a more potent solution. Most fights are not for money but when invited by the King or another VIP, fighters will perform for a pool of up to R40,000.00, the equivalent of $2,700.00. That money can be shared amongst as many as 20 fighters with the winner taking the lions share. Steve is seen doing pushups, hitting a puch bag made of a maize sack and with his brother Emmanuel. Steve likes to watch wrestling and boxing videos for inspiration, especially Mike Tyson and Muhammed Ali. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)

THOYANDO, VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 9 DECEMBER 2016: Steven Nditwani, 26, is one of two current senior champions in Venda's Musangwe fighting. This is an old sport practised by men in Venda and it has become a rite of passage for many Venda men, a way of displaying their courage in fronts of enthusiastic crowds over the Xmas period. Steven has been fighting since 2010 and won his first championship in 2013. The Venda people are superstitious and the fighters are no exception. Before a small fight Steven will rub a mixture of salt, child's urine and goat or pig fat on his body. Before a big fight, he will consult a traditional healer or Sangoma for a more potent solution. Most fights are not for money but when invited by the King or another VIP, fighters will perform for a pool of up to R40,000.00, the equivalent of $2,700.00. That money can be shared amongst as many as 20 fighters with the winner taking the lions share. Steve is seen doing pushups, hitting a puch bag made of a maize sack and with his brother Emmanuel. Steve likes to watch wrestling and boxing videos for inspiration, especially Mike Tyson and Muhammed Ali. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)

THOYANDO, VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 9 DECEMBER 2016: Steven Nditwani, 26, is one of two current senior champions in Venda's Musangwe fighting. This is an old sport practised by men in Venda and it has become a rite of passage for many Venda men, a way of displaying their courage in fronts of enthusiastic crowds over the Xmas period. Steven has been fighting since 2010 and won his first championship in 2013. The Venda people are superstitious and the fighters are no exception. Before a small fight Steven will rub a mixture of salt, child's urine and goat or pig fat on his body. Before a big fight, he will consult a traditional healer or Sangoma for a more potent solution. Most fights are not for money but when invited by the King or another VIP, fighters will perform for a pool of up to R40,000.00, the equivalent of $2,700.00. That money can be shared amongst as many as 20 fighters with the winner taking the lions share. Steve is seen doing pushups, hitting a puch bag made of a maize sack and with his brother Emmanuel. Steve likes to watch wrestling and boxing videos for inspiration, especially Mike Tyson and Muhammed Ali. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)

VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 11 DECEMBER 2016: Nephalama "Senior" Khodani, a Senior Champion Musangwe fighter. Musangwe is traditional bare knuckle boxing which occurs in Venda every Xmas period. Senior is 24 years old and has been fighting in Musangwe since 2007. He has had more bare knuckle fights than he can count and sees Musangwe as a way of taking fighting off the streets and onto a more sportsman like field. He says that when he was younger he was always fighting and his elders told him if he was going to fight he needed to do Musangwe. Senior is seen sparring with a friend on the actual Musangwe fighting ground in Venda and in portraits close to the capital Thoyando. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)

VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 11 DECEMBER 2016: Nephalama "Senior" Khodani, a Senior Champion Musangwe fighter. Musangwe is traditional bare knuckle boxing which occurs in Venda every Xmas period. Senior is 24 years old and has been fighting in Musangwe since 2007. He has had more bare knuckle fights than he can count and sees Musangwe as a way of taking fighting off the streets and onto a more sportsman like field. He says that when he was younger he was always fighting and his elders told him if he was going to fight he needed to do Musangwe. Senior is seen sparring with a friend on the actual Musangwe fighting ground in Venda and in portraits close to the capital Thoyando. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)

VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 11 DECEMBER 2016: Nephalama "Senior" Khodani, a Senior Champion Musangwe fighter. Musangwe is traditional bare knuckle boxing which occurs in Venda every Xmas period. Senior is 24 years old and has been fighting in Musangwe since 2007. He has had more bare knuckle fights than he can count and sees Musangwe as a way of taking fighting off the streets and onto a more sportsman like field. He says that when he was younger he was always fighting and his elders told him if he was going to fight he needed to do Musangwe. Senior is seen sparring with a friend on the actual Musangwe fighting ground in Venda and in portraits close to the capital Thoyando. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)

VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 11 DECEMBER 2016: "Zero" real name Enoch Kwinda, 31, consults a traditional healer/Sangoma who prescribes him a concoction called Thari. This is supposed to boost Zero's fighting prowess and make him invisible to his fighting opponents. Musangwe is traditional bare knuckle boxing which occurs in Venda every Xmas period. This Sangoma is also a warrant officer in a nearby police station. He claims his ability to heal and prescribe "muthi" came to him in a dream as a boy and he continues to dream to this day as to cures for his patients. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)

VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 11 DECEMBER 2016: "Zero" real name Enoch Kwinda, 31, consults a traditional healer/Sangoma who prescribes him a concoction called Thari. This is supposed to boost Zero's fighting prowess and make him invisible to his fighting opponents. Musangwe is traditional bare knuckle boxing which occurs in Venda every Xmas period. This Sangoma is also a warrant officer in a nearby police station. He claims his ability to heal and prescribe "muthi" came to him in a dream as a boy and he continues to dream to this day as to cures for his patients. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)

VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 11 DECEMBER 2016: Chief Boana Madzhuta, the tradional leader of Gaba village. The Chief's permission must be granted every year before Musangwe can begin. Musangwe is traditional bare knuckle boxing which occurs in Venda every Xmas period. The Chief is seen in his bedroom. He states that he'd like Musangwe to bring in more tourism so that his village can grow and improve. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)

VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 11 DECEMBER 2016: "Poison" Ndevana, 58, is the president of the Musangwe Comittee in Venda, he is seen training his two eldest boys Mudshidzi, 15, and Nanjana, 13. Poison says his two eldest are still too young to train seriously but he sees them as future champions. The two boys fight at every Musangwe event and are fearless of their opponents. Musangwe is traditional bare knuckle boxing which occurs in Venda every Xmas period. Poison is a former Umkhonto Wi Sizwe ANC military wing fighter but he was already a Musangwe Champion before he joined the Liberation movement. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)

VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 11 DECEMBER 2016: "Poison" Ndevana, 58, is the president of the Musangwe Comittee in Venda, he is seen training his two eldest boys Mudshidzi, 15, and Nanjana, 13. Poison says his two eldest are still too young to train seriously but he sees them as future champions. The two boys fight at every Musangwe event and are fearless of their opponents. Musangwe is traditional bare knuckle boxing which occurs in Venda every Xmas period. Poison is a former Umkhonto Wi Sizwe ANC military wing fighter but he was already a Musangwe Champion before he joined the Liberation movement. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)

VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 11 DECEMBER 2016: "Poison" Ndevana, 58, is the president of the Musangwe Comittee in Venda, he is seen training his two eldest boys Mudshidzi, 15, and Nanjana, 13. Poison says his two eldest are still too young to train seriously but he sees them as future champions. The two boys fight at every Musangwe event and are fearless of their opponents. Musangwe is traditional bare knuckle boxing which occurs in Venda every Xmas period. Poison is a former Umkhonto Wi Sizwe ANC military wing fighter but he was already a Musangwe Champion before he joined the Liberation movement. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)

VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 11 DECEMBER 2016: Mudshidzi, 15, and Nanjana, 13 Ndevana, seen after a sparring session at their home in Venda. These two young fighters are the eldest sons of the president of the Musangwe comittee, Poison Ndevana. He says his two eldest are still too young to train seriously but he sees them as future champions. The two boys fight at every Musangwe event and are fearless of their opponents. Musangwe is traditional bare knuckle boxing which occurs in Venda every Xmas period. Poison is a former Umkhonto Wi Sizwe ANC military wing fighter but he was already a Musangwe Champion before he joined the Liberation movement. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)

VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 11 DECEMBER 2016: A Musangwe bare knuckle boxing trophy carved from wood sits on an ironing board inside the home of "Poison" Ndevana, 58. Poison is the president of the Musangwe Comittee in Venda. Musangwe is traditional bare knuckle boxing which occurs in Venda every Xmas period. Poison is a former Umkhonto Wi Sizwe ANC military wing fighter but he was already a Musangwe Champion before he joined the Liberation movement. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)

TSHIFIDI, VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 15 DECEMBER 2016: Men and boys of the Venda tribe challenge each other and fight bare knuckle over the festive period in South Africa. This is a tradition that dates back 200 years and began when herd boys tried to get their cattle bulls to fight with each other while they were being dipped for disease. The herd boys soon began to fight with each other and this became a tradition. The fighters may stop at any time and if a fighter starts bleeding the fight is stopped. It is seen a an outlet for the males in the community and nowadays there are champions on three different levels. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)

TSHIFIDI, VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 15 DECEMBER 2016: Men and boys of the Venda tribe challenge each other and fight bare knuckle over the festive period in South Africa. This is a tradition that dates back 200 years and began when herd boys tried to get their cattle bulls to fight with each other while they were being dipped for disease. The herd boys soon began to fight with each other and this became a tradition. The fighters may stop at any time and if a fighter starts bleeding the fight is stopped. It is seen a an outlet for the males in the community and nowadays there are champions on three different levels. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)

TSHIFIDI, VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 15 DECEMBER 2016: Men and boys of the Venda tribe challenge each other and fight bare knuckle over the festive period in South Africa. This is a tradition that dates back 200 years and began when herd boys tried to get their cattle bulls to fight with each other while they were being dipped for disease. The herd boys soon began to fight with each other and this became a tradition. The fighters may stop at any time and if a fighter starts bleeding the fight is stopped. It is seen a an outlet for the males in the community and nowadays there are champions on three different levels. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)

TSHIFIDI, VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 15 DECEMBER 2016: Men and boys of the Venda tribe challenge each other and fight bare knuckle over the festive period in South Africa. This is a tradition that dates back 200 years and began when herd boys tried to get their cattle bulls to fight with each other while they were being dipped for disease. The herd boys soon began to fight with each other and this became a tradition. The fighters may stop at any time and if a fighter starts bleeding the fight is stopped. It is seen a an outlet for the males in the community and nowadays there are champions on three different levels. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)

TSHIFIDI, VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 15 DECEMBER 2016: Men and boys of the Venda tribe challenge each other and fight bare knuckle over the festive period in South Africa. This is a tradition that dates back 200 years and began when herd boys tried to get their cattle bulls to fight with each other while they were being dipped for disease. The herd boys soon began to fight with each other and this became a tradition. The fighters may stop at any time and if a fighter starts bleeding the fight is stopped. It is seen a an outlet for the males in the community and nowadays there are champions on three different levels. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)

TSHIFIDI, VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 15 DECEMBER 2016: Men and boys of the Venda tribe challenge each other and fight bare knuckle over the festive period in South Africa. This is a tradition that dates back 200 years and began when herd boys tried to get their cattle bulls to fight with each other while they were being dipped for disease. The herd boys soon began to fight with each other and this became a tradition. The fighters may stop at any time and if a fighter starts bleeding the fight is stopped. It is seen a an outlet for the males in the community and nowadays there are champions on three different levels. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)

TSHIFIDI, VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 15 DECEMBER 2016: Men and boys of the Venda tribe challenge each other and fight bare knuckle over the festive period in South Africa. This is a tradition that dates back 200 years and began when herd boys tried to get their cattle bulls to fight with each other while they were being dipped for disease. The herd boys soon began to fight with each other and this became a tradition. The fighters may stop at any time and if a fighter starts bleeding the fight is stopped. It is seen a an outlet for the males in the community and nowadays there are champions on three different levels. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)

TSHIFIDI, VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 15 DECEMBER 2016: Men and boys of the Venda tribe challenge each other and fight bare knuckle over the festive period in South Africa. This is a tradition that dates back 200 years and began when herd boys tried to get their cattle bulls to fight with each other while they were being dipped for disease. The herd boys soon began to fight with each other and this became a tradition. The fighters may stop at any time and if a fighter starts bleeding the fight is stopped. It is seen a an outlet for the males in the community and nowadays there are champions on three different levels. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)

TSHIFIDI, VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 15 DECEMBER 2016: Men and boys of the Venda tribe challenge each other and fight bare knuckle over the festive period in South Africa. This is a tradition that dates back 200 years and began when herd boys tried to get their cattle bulls to fight with each other while they were being dipped for disease. The herd boys soon began to fight with each other and this became a tradition. The fighters may stop at any time and if a fighter starts bleeding the fight is stopped. It is seen a an outlet for the males in the community and nowadays there are champions on three different levels. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)

TSHIFIDI, VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 15 DECEMBER 2016: Men and boys of the Venda tribe challenge each other and fight bare knuckle over the festive period in South Africa. This is a tradition that dates back 200 years and began when herd boys tried to get their cattle bulls to fight with each other while they were being dipped for disease. The herd boys soon began to fight with each other and this became a tradition. The fighters may stop at any time and if a fighter starts bleeding the fight is stopped. It is seen a an outlet for the males in the community and nowadays there are champions on three different levels. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)

TSHIFIDI, VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 15 DECEMBER 2016: Men and boys of the Venda tribe challenge each other and fight bare knuckle over the festive period in South Africa. This is a tradition that dates back 200 years and began when herd boys tried to get their cattle bulls to fight with each other while they were being dipped for disease. The herd boys soon began to fight with each other and this became a tradition. The fighters may stop at any time and if a fighter starts bleeding the fight is stopped. It is seen a an outlet for the males in the community and nowadays there are champions on three different levels. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)

TSHIFIDI, VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 15 DECEMBER 2016: Men and boys of the Venda tribe challenge each other and fight bare knuckle over the festive period in South Africa. This is a tradition that dates back 200 years and began when herd boys tried to get their cattle bulls to fight with each other while they were being dipped for disease. The herd boys soon began to fight with each other and this became a tradition. The fighters may stop at any time and if a fighter starts bleeding the fight is stopped. It is seen a an outlet for the males in the community and nowadays there are champions on three different levels. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)

TSHIFIDI, VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 15 DECEMBER 2016: Men and boys of the Venda tribe challenge each other and fight bare knuckle over the festive period in South Africa. This is a tradition that dates back 200 years and began when herd boys tried to get their cattle bulls to fight with each other while they were being dipped for disease. The herd boys soon began to fight with each other and this became a tradition. The fighters may stop at any time and if a fighter starts bleeding the fight is stopped. It is seen a an outlet for the males in the community and nowadays there are champions on three different levels. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)

TSHIFIDI, VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 15 DECEMBER 2016: Men and boys of the Venda tribe challenge each other and fight bare knuckle over the festive period in South Africa. This is a tradition that dates back 200 years and began when herd boys tried to get their cattle bulls to fight with each other while they were being dipped for disease. The herd boys soon began to fight with each other and this became a tradition. The fighters may stop at any time and if a fighter starts bleeding the fight is stopped. It is seen a an outlet for the males in the community and nowadays there are champions on three different levels. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)

TSHIFIDI, VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 15 DECEMBER 2016: Men and boys of the Venda tribe challenge each other and fight bare knuckle over the festive period in South Africa. This is a tradition that dates back 200 years and began when herd boys tried to get their cattle bulls to fight with each other while they were being dipped for disease. The herd boys soon began to fight with each other and this became a tradition. The fighters may stop at any time and if a fighter starts bleeding the fight is stopped. It is seen a an outlet for the males in the community and nowadays there are champions on three different levels. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)

TSHIFIDI, VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 15 DECEMBER 2016: Men and boys of the Venda tribe challenge each other and fight bare knuckle over the festive period in South Africa. This is a tradition that dates back 200 years and began when herd boys tried to get their cattle bulls to fight with each other while they were being dipped for disease. The herd boys soon began to fight with each other and this became a tradition. The fighters may stop at any time and if a fighter starts bleeding the fight is stopped. It is seen a an outlet for the males in the community and nowadays there are champions on three different levels. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)

TSHIFIDI, VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 15 DECEMBER 2016: Men and boys of the Venda tribe challenge each other and fight bare knuckle over the festive period in South Africa. This is a tradition that dates back 200 years and began when herd boys tried to get their cattle bulls to fight with each other while they were being dipped for disease. The herd boys soon began to fight with each other and this became a tradition. The fighters may stop at any time and if a fighter starts bleeding the fight is stopped. It is seen a an outlet for the males in the community and nowadays there are champions on three different levels. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)

TSHIFIDI, VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 15 DECEMBER 2016: Men and boys of the Venda tribe challenge each other and fight bare knuckle over the festive period in South Africa. This is a tradition that dates back 200 years and began when herd boys tried to get their cattle bulls to fight with each other while they were being dipped for disease. The herd boys soon began to fight with each other and this became a tradition. The fighters may stop at any time and if a fighter starts bleeding the fight is stopped. It is seen a an outlet for the males in the community and nowadays there are champions on three different levels. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)

TSHIFIDI, VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 15 DECEMBER 2016: Men and boys of the Venda tribe challenge each other and fight bare knuckle over the festive period in South Africa. This is a tradition that dates back 200 years and began when herd boys tried to get their cattle bulls to fight with each other while they were being dipped for disease. The herd boys soon began to fight with each other and this became a tradition. The fighters may stop at any time and if a fighter starts bleeding the fight is stopped. It is seen a an outlet for the males in the community and nowadays there are champions on three different levels. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)

TSHIFIDI, VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 15 DECEMBER 2016: Men and boys of the Venda tribe challenge each other and fight bare knuckle over the festive period in South Africa. This is a tradition that dates back 200 years and began when herd boys tried to get their cattle bulls to fight with each other while they were being dipped for disease. The herd boys soon began to fight with each other and this became a tradition. The fighters may stop at any time and if a fighter starts bleeding the fight is stopped. It is seen a an outlet for the males in the community and nowadays there are champions on three different levels. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)

 VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 11 DECEMBER 2016: Tshumelo “Killer” Makhado, 15, a young up and coming Musangwe fighter. Musangwe is traditional bare knuckle boxing which occurs in Venda every Xmas period. Killer is hoping to become a professional boxer but is busy with school and does not have the funds for a boxing gym in Venda. He has had 40 Musangwe bare knuckle fights and his record stands at 38-2. He is seen by the Musangwe community as a future senior champion and someone who could become a professional boxer one day. Killer is seen with trainer and Musangwe committee president, Poison, who is a teacher at a local school and long time Musangwe participant.  Killer hits the punching bag the committee bought him, does shadow boxing and runs for fitness. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)
 VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 11 DECEMBER 2016: Tshumelo “Killer” Makhado, 15, a young up and coming Musangwe fighter. Musangwe is traditional bare knuckle boxing which occurs in Venda every Xmas period. Killer is hoping to become a professional boxer but is busy with school and does not have the funds for a boxing gym in Venda. He has had 40 Musangwe bare knuckle fights and his record stands at 38-2. He is seen by the Musangwe community as a future senior champion and someone who could become a professional boxer one day. Killer is seen with trainer and Musangwe committee president, Poison, who is a teacher at a local school and long time Musangwe participant.  Killer hits the punching bag the committee bought him, does shadow boxing and runs for fitness. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)
 THOYANDO, VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 9 DECEMBER 2016: Steven Nditwani, 26, is one of two current senior champions in Venda's Musangwe fighting. This is an old sport practised by men in Venda and it has become a rite of passage for many Venda men, a way of displaying their courage in fronts of enthusiastic crowds over the Xmas period. Steven has been fighting since 2010 and won his first championship in 2013. The Venda people are superstitious and the fighters are no exception. Before a small fight Steven will rub a mixture of salt, child's urine and goat or pig fat on his body. Before a big fight, he will consult a traditional healer or Sangoma for a more potent solution. Most fights are not for money but when invited by the King or another VIP, fighters will perform for a pool of up to R40,000.00, the equivalent of $2,700.00. That money can be shared amongst as many as 20 fighters with the winner taking the lions share. Steve is seen doing pushups, hitting a puch bag made of a maize sack and with his brother Emmanuel. Steve likes to watch wrestling and boxing videos for inspiration, especially Mike Tyson and Muhammed Ali. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)
 THOYANDO, VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 9 DECEMBER 2016: Steven Nditwani, 26, is one of two current senior champions in Venda's Musangwe fighting. This is an old sport practised by men in Venda and it has become a rite of passage for many Venda men, a way of displaying their courage in fronts of enthusiastic crowds over the Xmas period. Steven has been fighting since 2010 and won his first championship in 2013. The Venda people are superstitious and the fighters are no exception. Before a small fight Steven will rub a mixture of salt, child's urine and goat or pig fat on his body. Before a big fight, he will consult a traditional healer or Sangoma for a more potent solution. Most fights are not for money but when invited by the King or another VIP, fighters will perform for a pool of up to R40,000.00, the equivalent of $2,700.00. That money can be shared amongst as many as 20 fighters with the winner taking the lions share. Steve is seen doing pushups, hitting a puch bag made of a maize sack and with his brother Emmanuel. Steve likes to watch wrestling and boxing videos for inspiration, especially Mike Tyson and Muhammed Ali. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)
 THOYANDO, VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 9 DECEMBER 2016: Steven Nditwani, 26, is one of two current senior champions in Venda's Musangwe fighting. This is an old sport practised by men in Venda and it has become a rite of passage for many Venda men, a way of displaying their courage in fronts of enthusiastic crowds over the Xmas period. Steven has been fighting since 2010 and won his first championship in 2013. The Venda people are superstitious and the fighters are no exception. Before a small fight Steven will rub a mixture of salt, child's urine and goat or pig fat on his body. Before a big fight, he will consult a traditional healer or Sangoma for a more potent solution. Most fights are not for money but when invited by the King or another VIP, fighters will perform for a pool of up to R40,000.00, the equivalent of $2,700.00. That money can be shared amongst as many as 20 fighters with the winner taking the lions share. Steve is seen doing pushups, hitting a puch bag made of a maize sack and with his brother Emmanuel. Steve likes to watch wrestling and boxing videos for inspiration, especially Mike Tyson and Muhammed Ali. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)
 THOYANDO, VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 9 DECEMBER 2016: Steven Nditwani, 26, is one of two current senior champions in Venda's Musangwe fighting. This is an old sport practised by men in Venda and it has become a rite of passage for many Venda men, a way of displaying their courage in fronts of enthusiastic crowds over the Xmas period. Steven has been fighting since 2010 and won his first championship in 2013. The Venda people are superstitious and the fighters are no exception. Before a small fight Steven will rub a mixture of salt, child's urine and goat or pig fat on his body. Before a big fight, he will consult a traditional healer or Sangoma for a more potent solution. Most fights are not for money but when invited by the King or another VIP, fighters will perform for a pool of up to R40,000.00, the equivalent of $2,700.00. That money can be shared amongst as many as 20 fighters with the winner taking the lions share. Steve is seen doing pushups, hitting a puch bag made of a maize sack and with his brother Emmanuel. Steve likes to watch wrestling and boxing videos for inspiration, especially Mike Tyson and Muhammed Ali. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)
 VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 11 DECEMBER 2016: Nephalama "Senior" Khodani, a Senior Champion Musangwe fighter. Musangwe is traditional bare knuckle boxing which occurs in Venda every Xmas period. Senior is 24 years old and has been fighting in Musangwe since 2007. He has had more bare knuckle fights than he can count and sees Musangwe as a way of taking fighting off the streets and onto a more sportsman like field. He says that when he was younger he was always fighting and his elders told him if he was going to fight he needed to do Musangwe. Senior is seen sparring with a friend on the actual Musangwe fighting ground in Venda and in portraits close to the capital Thoyando. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)
 VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 11 DECEMBER 2016: Nephalama "Senior" Khodani, a Senior Champion Musangwe fighter. Musangwe is traditional bare knuckle boxing which occurs in Venda every Xmas period. Senior is 24 years old and has been fighting in Musangwe since 2007. He has had more bare knuckle fights than he can count and sees Musangwe as a way of taking fighting off the streets and onto a more sportsman like field. He says that when he was younger he was always fighting and his elders told him if he was going to fight he needed to do Musangwe. Senior is seen sparring with a friend on the actual Musangwe fighting ground in Venda and in portraits close to the capital Thoyando. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)
 VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 11 DECEMBER 2016: Nephalama "Senior" Khodani, a Senior Champion Musangwe fighter. Musangwe is traditional bare knuckle boxing which occurs in Venda every Xmas period. Senior is 24 years old and has been fighting in Musangwe since 2007. He has had more bare knuckle fights than he can count and sees Musangwe as a way of taking fighting off the streets and onto a more sportsman like field. He says that when he was younger he was always fighting and his elders told him if he was going to fight he needed to do Musangwe. Senior is seen sparring with a friend on the actual Musangwe fighting ground in Venda and in portraits close to the capital Thoyando. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)
 VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 11 DECEMBER 2016: "Zero" real name Enoch Kwinda, 31, consults a traditional healer/Sangoma who prescribes him a concoction called Thari. This is supposed to boost Zero's fighting prowess and make him invisible to his fighting opponents. Musangwe is traditional bare knuckle boxing which occurs in Venda every Xmas period. This Sangoma is also a warrant officer in a nearby police station. He claims his ability to heal and prescribe "muthi" came to him in a dream as a boy and he continues to dream to this day as to cures for his patients. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)
 VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 11 DECEMBER 2016: "Zero" real name Enoch Kwinda, 31, consults a traditional healer/Sangoma who prescribes him a concoction called Thari. This is supposed to boost Zero's fighting prowess and make him invisible to his fighting opponents. Musangwe is traditional bare knuckle boxing which occurs in Venda every Xmas period. This Sangoma is also a warrant officer in a nearby police station. He claims his ability to heal and prescribe "muthi" came to him in a dream as a boy and he continues to dream to this day as to cures for his patients. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)
 VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 11 DECEMBER 2016: Chief Boana Madzhuta, the tradional leader of Gaba village. The Chief's permission must be granted every year before Musangwe can begin. Musangwe is traditional bare knuckle boxing which occurs in Venda every Xmas period. The Chief is seen in his bedroom. He states that he'd like Musangwe to bring in more tourism so that his village can grow and improve. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)
 VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 11 DECEMBER 2016: "Poison" Ndevana, 58, is the president of the Musangwe Comittee in Venda, he is seen training his two eldest boys Mudshidzi, 15, and Nanjana, 13. Poison says his two eldest are still too young to train seriously but he sees them as future champions. The two boys fight at every Musangwe event and are fearless of their opponents. Musangwe is traditional bare knuckle boxing which occurs in Venda every Xmas period. Poison is a former Umkhonto Wi Sizwe ANC military wing fighter but he was already a Musangwe Champion before he joined the Liberation movement. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)
 VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 11 DECEMBER 2016: "Poison" Ndevana, 58, is the president of the Musangwe Comittee in Venda, he is seen training his two eldest boys Mudshidzi, 15, and Nanjana, 13. Poison says his two eldest are still too young to train seriously but he sees them as future champions. The two boys fight at every Musangwe event and are fearless of their opponents. Musangwe is traditional bare knuckle boxing which occurs in Venda every Xmas period. Poison is a former Umkhonto Wi Sizwe ANC military wing fighter but he was already a Musangwe Champion before he joined the Liberation movement. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)
 VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 11 DECEMBER 2016: "Poison" Ndevana, 58, is the president of the Musangwe Comittee in Venda, he is seen training his two eldest boys Mudshidzi, 15, and Nanjana, 13. Poison says his two eldest are still too young to train seriously but he sees them as future champions. The two boys fight at every Musangwe event and are fearless of their opponents. Musangwe is traditional bare knuckle boxing which occurs in Venda every Xmas period. Poison is a former Umkhonto Wi Sizwe ANC military wing fighter but he was already a Musangwe Champion before he joined the Liberation movement. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)
 VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 11 DECEMBER 2016: Mudshidzi, 15, and Nanjana, 13 Ndevana, seen after a sparring session at their home in Venda. These two young fighters are the eldest sons of the president of the Musangwe comittee, Poison Ndevana. He says his two eldest are still too young to train seriously but he sees them as future champions. The two boys fight at every Musangwe event and are fearless of their opponents. Musangwe is traditional bare knuckle boxing which occurs in Venda every Xmas period. Poison is a former Umkhonto Wi Sizwe ANC military wing fighter but he was already a Musangwe Champion before he joined the Liberation movement. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)
 VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 11 DECEMBER 2016: A Musangwe bare knuckle boxing trophy carved from wood sits on an ironing board inside the home of "Poison" Ndevana, 58. Poison is the president of the Musangwe Comittee in Venda. Musangwe is traditional bare knuckle boxing which occurs in Venda every Xmas period. Poison is a former Umkhonto Wi Sizwe ANC military wing fighter but he was already a Musangwe Champion before he joined the Liberation movement. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)
 TSHIFIDI, VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 15 DECEMBER 2016: Men and boys of the Venda tribe challenge each other and fight bare knuckle over the festive period in South Africa. This is a tradition that dates back 200 years and began when herd boys tried to get their cattle bulls to fight with each other while they were being dipped for disease. The herd boys soon began to fight with each other and this became a tradition. The fighters may stop at any time and if a fighter starts bleeding the fight is stopped. It is seen a an outlet for the males in the community and nowadays there are champions on three different levels. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)
 TSHIFIDI, VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 15 DECEMBER 2016: Men and boys of the Venda tribe challenge each other and fight bare knuckle over the festive period in South Africa. This is a tradition that dates back 200 years and began when herd boys tried to get their cattle bulls to fight with each other while they were being dipped for disease. The herd boys soon began to fight with each other and this became a tradition. The fighters may stop at any time and if a fighter starts bleeding the fight is stopped. It is seen a an outlet for the males in the community and nowadays there are champions on three different levels. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)
 TSHIFIDI, VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 15 DECEMBER 2016: Men and boys of the Venda tribe challenge each other and fight bare knuckle over the festive period in South Africa. This is a tradition that dates back 200 years and began when herd boys tried to get their cattle bulls to fight with each other while they were being dipped for disease. The herd boys soon began to fight with each other and this became a tradition. The fighters may stop at any time and if a fighter starts bleeding the fight is stopped. It is seen a an outlet for the males in the community and nowadays there are champions on three different levels. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)
 TSHIFIDI, VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 15 DECEMBER 2016: Men and boys of the Venda tribe challenge each other and fight bare knuckle over the festive period in South Africa. This is a tradition that dates back 200 years and began when herd boys tried to get their cattle bulls to fight with each other while they were being dipped for disease. The herd boys soon began to fight with each other and this became a tradition. The fighters may stop at any time and if a fighter starts bleeding the fight is stopped. It is seen a an outlet for the males in the community and nowadays there are champions on three different levels. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)
 TSHIFIDI, VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 15 DECEMBER 2016: Men and boys of the Venda tribe challenge each other and fight bare knuckle over the festive period in South Africa. This is a tradition that dates back 200 years and began when herd boys tried to get their cattle bulls to fight with each other while they were being dipped for disease. The herd boys soon began to fight with each other and this became a tradition. The fighters may stop at any time and if a fighter starts bleeding the fight is stopped. It is seen a an outlet for the males in the community and nowadays there are champions on three different levels. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)
 TSHIFIDI, VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 15 DECEMBER 2016: Men and boys of the Venda tribe challenge each other and fight bare knuckle over the festive period in South Africa. This is a tradition that dates back 200 years and began when herd boys tried to get their cattle bulls to fight with each other while they were being dipped for disease. The herd boys soon began to fight with each other and this became a tradition. The fighters may stop at any time and if a fighter starts bleeding the fight is stopped. It is seen a an outlet for the males in the community and nowadays there are champions on three different levels. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)
 TSHIFIDI, VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 15 DECEMBER 2016: Men and boys of the Venda tribe challenge each other and fight bare knuckle over the festive period in South Africa. This is a tradition that dates back 200 years and began when herd boys tried to get their cattle bulls to fight with each other while they were being dipped for disease. The herd boys soon began to fight with each other and this became a tradition. The fighters may stop at any time and if a fighter starts bleeding the fight is stopped. It is seen a an outlet for the males in the community and nowadays there are champions on three different levels. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)
 TSHIFIDI, VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 15 DECEMBER 2016: Men and boys of the Venda tribe challenge each other and fight bare knuckle over the festive period in South Africa. This is a tradition that dates back 200 years and began when herd boys tried to get their cattle bulls to fight with each other while they were being dipped for disease. The herd boys soon began to fight with each other and this became a tradition. The fighters may stop at any time and if a fighter starts bleeding the fight is stopped. It is seen a an outlet for the males in the community and nowadays there are champions on three different levels. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)
 TSHIFIDI, VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 15 DECEMBER 2016: Men and boys of the Venda tribe challenge each other and fight bare knuckle over the festive period in South Africa. This is a tradition that dates back 200 years and began when herd boys tried to get their cattle bulls to fight with each other while they were being dipped for disease. The herd boys soon began to fight with each other and this became a tradition. The fighters may stop at any time and if a fighter starts bleeding the fight is stopped. It is seen a an outlet for the males in the community and nowadays there are champions on three different levels. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)
 TSHIFIDI, VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 15 DECEMBER 2016: Men and boys of the Venda tribe challenge each other and fight bare knuckle over the festive period in South Africa. This is a tradition that dates back 200 years and began when herd boys tried to get their cattle bulls to fight with each other while they were being dipped for disease. The herd boys soon began to fight with each other and this became a tradition. The fighters may stop at any time and if a fighter starts bleeding the fight is stopped. It is seen a an outlet for the males in the community and nowadays there are champions on three different levels. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)
 TSHIFIDI, VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 15 DECEMBER 2016: Men and boys of the Venda tribe challenge each other and fight bare knuckle over the festive period in South Africa. This is a tradition that dates back 200 years and began when herd boys tried to get their cattle bulls to fight with each other while they were being dipped for disease. The herd boys soon began to fight with each other and this became a tradition. The fighters may stop at any time and if a fighter starts bleeding the fight is stopped. It is seen a an outlet for the males in the community and nowadays there are champions on three different levels. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)
 TSHIFIDI, VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 15 DECEMBER 2016: Men and boys of the Venda tribe challenge each other and fight bare knuckle over the festive period in South Africa. This is a tradition that dates back 200 years and began when herd boys tried to get their cattle bulls to fight with each other while they were being dipped for disease. The herd boys soon began to fight with each other and this became a tradition. The fighters may stop at any time and if a fighter starts bleeding the fight is stopped. It is seen a an outlet for the males in the community and nowadays there are champions on three different levels. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)
 TSHIFIDI, VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 15 DECEMBER 2016: Men and boys of the Venda tribe challenge each other and fight bare knuckle over the festive period in South Africa. This is a tradition that dates back 200 years and began when herd boys tried to get their cattle bulls to fight with each other while they were being dipped for disease. The herd boys soon began to fight with each other and this became a tradition. The fighters may stop at any time and if a fighter starts bleeding the fight is stopped. It is seen a an outlet for the males in the community and nowadays there are champions on three different levels. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)
 TSHIFIDI, VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 15 DECEMBER 2016: Men and boys of the Venda tribe challenge each other and fight bare knuckle over the festive period in South Africa. This is a tradition that dates back 200 years and began when herd boys tried to get their cattle bulls to fight with each other while they were being dipped for disease. The herd boys soon began to fight with each other and this became a tradition. The fighters may stop at any time and if a fighter starts bleeding the fight is stopped. It is seen a an outlet for the males in the community and nowadays there are champions on three different levels. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)
 TSHIFIDI, VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 15 DECEMBER 2016: Men and boys of the Venda tribe challenge each other and fight bare knuckle over the festive period in South Africa. This is a tradition that dates back 200 years and began when herd boys tried to get their cattle bulls to fight with each other while they were being dipped for disease. The herd boys soon began to fight with each other and this became a tradition. The fighters may stop at any time and if a fighter starts bleeding the fight is stopped. It is seen a an outlet for the males in the community and nowadays there are champions on three different levels. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)
 TSHIFIDI, VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 15 DECEMBER 2016: Men and boys of the Venda tribe challenge each other and fight bare knuckle over the festive period in South Africa. This is a tradition that dates back 200 years and began when herd boys tried to get their cattle bulls to fight with each other while they were being dipped for disease. The herd boys soon began to fight with each other and this became a tradition. The fighters may stop at any time and if a fighter starts bleeding the fight is stopped. It is seen a an outlet for the males in the community and nowadays there are champions on three different levels. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)
 TSHIFIDI, VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 15 DECEMBER 2016: Men and boys of the Venda tribe challenge each other and fight bare knuckle over the festive period in South Africa. This is a tradition that dates back 200 years and began when herd boys tried to get their cattle bulls to fight with each other while they were being dipped for disease. The herd boys soon began to fight with each other and this became a tradition. The fighters may stop at any time and if a fighter starts bleeding the fight is stopped. It is seen a an outlet for the males in the community and nowadays there are champions on three different levels. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)
 TSHIFIDI, VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 15 DECEMBER 2016: Men and boys of the Venda tribe challenge each other and fight bare knuckle over the festive period in South Africa. This is a tradition that dates back 200 years and began when herd boys tried to get their cattle bulls to fight with each other while they were being dipped for disease. The herd boys soon began to fight with each other and this became a tradition. The fighters may stop at any time and if a fighter starts bleeding the fight is stopped. It is seen a an outlet for the males in the community and nowadays there are champions on three different levels. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)
 TSHIFIDI, VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 15 DECEMBER 2016: Men and boys of the Venda tribe challenge each other and fight bare knuckle over the festive period in South Africa. This is a tradition that dates back 200 years and began when herd boys tried to get their cattle bulls to fight with each other while they were being dipped for disease. The herd boys soon began to fight with each other and this became a tradition. The fighters may stop at any time and if a fighter starts bleeding the fight is stopped. It is seen a an outlet for the males in the community and nowadays there are champions on three different levels. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)
 TSHIFIDI, VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 15 DECEMBER 2016: Men and boys of the Venda tribe challenge each other and fight bare knuckle over the festive period in South Africa. This is a tradition that dates back 200 years and began when herd boys tried to get their cattle bulls to fight with each other while they were being dipped for disease. The herd boys soon began to fight with each other and this became a tradition. The fighters may stop at any time and if a fighter starts bleeding the fight is stopped. It is seen a an outlet for the males in the community and nowadays there are champions on three different levels. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)

VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 11 DECEMBER 2016: Tshumelo “Killer” Makhado, 15, a young up and coming Musangwe fighter. Musangwe is traditional bare knuckle boxing which occurs in Venda every Xmas period. Killer is hoping to become a professional boxer but is busy with school and does not have the funds for a boxing gym in Venda. He has had 40 Musangwe bare knuckle fights and his record stands at 38-2. He is seen by the Musangwe community as a future senior champion and someone who could become a professional boxer one day. Killer is seen with trainer and Musangwe committee president, Poison, who is a teacher at a local school and long time Musangwe participant. Killer hits the punching bag the committee bought him, does shadow boxing and runs for fitness. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)

VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 11 DECEMBER 2016: Tshumelo “Killer” Makhado, 15, a young up and coming Musangwe fighter. Musangwe is traditional bare knuckle boxing which occurs in Venda every Xmas period. Killer is hoping to become a professional boxer but is busy with school and does not have the funds for a boxing gym in Venda. He has had 40 Musangwe bare knuckle fights and his record stands at 38-2. He is seen by the Musangwe community as a future senior champion and someone who could become a professional boxer one day. Killer is seen with trainer and Musangwe committee president, Poison, who is a teacher at a local school and long time Musangwe participant. Killer hits the punching bag the committee bought him, does shadow boxing and runs for fitness. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)

THOYANDO, VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 9 DECEMBER 2016: Steven Nditwani, 26, is one of two current senior champions in Venda's Musangwe fighting. This is an old sport practised by men in Venda and it has become a rite of passage for many Venda men, a way of displaying their courage in fronts of enthusiastic crowds over the Xmas period. Steven has been fighting since 2010 and won his first championship in 2013. The Venda people are superstitious and the fighters are no exception. Before a small fight Steven will rub a mixture of salt, child's urine and goat or pig fat on his body. Before a big fight, he will consult a traditional healer or Sangoma for a more potent solution. Most fights are not for money but when invited by the King or another VIP, fighters will perform for a pool of up to R40,000.00, the equivalent of $2,700.00. That money can be shared amongst as many as 20 fighters with the winner taking the lions share. Steve is seen doing pushups, hitting a puch bag made of a maize sack and with his brother Emmanuel. Steve likes to watch wrestling and boxing videos for inspiration, especially Mike Tyson and Muhammed Ali. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)

THOYANDO, VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 9 DECEMBER 2016: Steven Nditwani, 26, is one of two current senior champions in Venda's Musangwe fighting. This is an old sport practised by men in Venda and it has become a rite of passage for many Venda men, a way of displaying their courage in fronts of enthusiastic crowds over the Xmas period. Steven has been fighting since 2010 and won his first championship in 2013. The Venda people are superstitious and the fighters are no exception. Before a small fight Steven will rub a mixture of salt, child's urine and goat or pig fat on his body. Before a big fight, he will consult a traditional healer or Sangoma for a more potent solution. Most fights are not for money but when invited by the King or another VIP, fighters will perform for a pool of up to R40,000.00, the equivalent of $2,700.00. That money can be shared amongst as many as 20 fighters with the winner taking the lions share. Steve is seen doing pushups, hitting a puch bag made of a maize sack and with his brother Emmanuel. Steve likes to watch wrestling and boxing videos for inspiration, especially Mike Tyson and Muhammed Ali. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)

THOYANDO, VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 9 DECEMBER 2016: Steven Nditwani, 26, is one of two current senior champions in Venda's Musangwe fighting. This is an old sport practised by men in Venda and it has become a rite of passage for many Venda men, a way of displaying their courage in fronts of enthusiastic crowds over the Xmas period. Steven has been fighting since 2010 and won his first championship in 2013. The Venda people are superstitious and the fighters are no exception. Before a small fight Steven will rub a mixture of salt, child's urine and goat or pig fat on his body. Before a big fight, he will consult a traditional healer or Sangoma for a more potent solution. Most fights are not for money but when invited by the King or another VIP, fighters will perform for a pool of up to R40,000.00, the equivalent of $2,700.00. That money can be shared amongst as many as 20 fighters with the winner taking the lions share. Steve is seen doing pushups, hitting a puch bag made of a maize sack and with his brother Emmanuel. Steve likes to watch wrestling and boxing videos for inspiration, especially Mike Tyson and Muhammed Ali. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)

THOYANDO, VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 9 DECEMBER 2016: Steven Nditwani, 26, is one of two current senior champions in Venda's Musangwe fighting. This is an old sport practised by men in Venda and it has become a rite of passage for many Venda men, a way of displaying their courage in fronts of enthusiastic crowds over the Xmas period. Steven has been fighting since 2010 and won his first championship in 2013. The Venda people are superstitious and the fighters are no exception. Before a small fight Steven will rub a mixture of salt, child's urine and goat or pig fat on his body. Before a big fight, he will consult a traditional healer or Sangoma for a more potent solution. Most fights are not for money but when invited by the King or another VIP, fighters will perform for a pool of up to R40,000.00, the equivalent of $2,700.00. That money can be shared amongst as many as 20 fighters with the winner taking the lions share. Steve is seen doing pushups, hitting a puch bag made of a maize sack and with his brother Emmanuel. Steve likes to watch wrestling and boxing videos for inspiration, especially Mike Tyson and Muhammed Ali. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)

VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 11 DECEMBER 2016: Nephalama "Senior" Khodani, a Senior Champion Musangwe fighter. Musangwe is traditional bare knuckle boxing which occurs in Venda every Xmas period. Senior is 24 years old and has been fighting in Musangwe since 2007. He has had more bare knuckle fights than he can count and sees Musangwe as a way of taking fighting off the streets and onto a more sportsman like field. He says that when he was younger he was always fighting and his elders told him if he was going to fight he needed to do Musangwe. Senior is seen sparring with a friend on the actual Musangwe fighting ground in Venda and in portraits close to the capital Thoyando. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)

VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 11 DECEMBER 2016: Nephalama "Senior" Khodani, a Senior Champion Musangwe fighter. Musangwe is traditional bare knuckle boxing which occurs in Venda every Xmas period. Senior is 24 years old and has been fighting in Musangwe since 2007. He has had more bare knuckle fights than he can count and sees Musangwe as a way of taking fighting off the streets and onto a more sportsman like field. He says that when he was younger he was always fighting and his elders told him if he was going to fight he needed to do Musangwe. Senior is seen sparring with a friend on the actual Musangwe fighting ground in Venda and in portraits close to the capital Thoyando. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)

VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 11 DECEMBER 2016: Nephalama "Senior" Khodani, a Senior Champion Musangwe fighter. Musangwe is traditional bare knuckle boxing which occurs in Venda every Xmas period. Senior is 24 years old and has been fighting in Musangwe since 2007. He has had more bare knuckle fights than he can count and sees Musangwe as a way of taking fighting off the streets and onto a more sportsman like field. He says that when he was younger he was always fighting and his elders told him if he was going to fight he needed to do Musangwe. Senior is seen sparring with a friend on the actual Musangwe fighting ground in Venda and in portraits close to the capital Thoyando. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)

VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 11 DECEMBER 2016: "Zero" real name Enoch Kwinda, 31, consults a traditional healer/Sangoma who prescribes him a concoction called Thari. This is supposed to boost Zero's fighting prowess and make him invisible to his fighting opponents. Musangwe is traditional bare knuckle boxing which occurs in Venda every Xmas period. This Sangoma is also a warrant officer in a nearby police station. He claims his ability to heal and prescribe "muthi" came to him in a dream as a boy and he continues to dream to this day as to cures for his patients. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)

VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 11 DECEMBER 2016: "Zero" real name Enoch Kwinda, 31, consults a traditional healer/Sangoma who prescribes him a concoction called Thari. This is supposed to boost Zero's fighting prowess and make him invisible to his fighting opponents. Musangwe is traditional bare knuckle boxing which occurs in Venda every Xmas period. This Sangoma is also a warrant officer in a nearby police station. He claims his ability to heal and prescribe "muthi" came to him in a dream as a boy and he continues to dream to this day as to cures for his patients. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)

VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 11 DECEMBER 2016: Chief Boana Madzhuta, the tradional leader of Gaba village. The Chief's permission must be granted every year before Musangwe can begin. Musangwe is traditional bare knuckle boxing which occurs in Venda every Xmas period. The Chief is seen in his bedroom. He states that he'd like Musangwe to bring in more tourism so that his village can grow and improve. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)

VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 11 DECEMBER 2016: "Poison" Ndevana, 58, is the president of the Musangwe Comittee in Venda, he is seen training his two eldest boys Mudshidzi, 15, and Nanjana, 13. Poison says his two eldest are still too young to train seriously but he sees them as future champions. The two boys fight at every Musangwe event and are fearless of their opponents. Musangwe is traditional bare knuckle boxing which occurs in Venda every Xmas period. Poison is a former Umkhonto Wi Sizwe ANC military wing fighter but he was already a Musangwe Champion before he joined the Liberation movement. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)

VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 11 DECEMBER 2016: "Poison" Ndevana, 58, is the president of the Musangwe Comittee in Venda, he is seen training his two eldest boys Mudshidzi, 15, and Nanjana, 13. Poison says his two eldest are still too young to train seriously but he sees them as future champions. The two boys fight at every Musangwe event and are fearless of their opponents. Musangwe is traditional bare knuckle boxing which occurs in Venda every Xmas period. Poison is a former Umkhonto Wi Sizwe ANC military wing fighter but he was already a Musangwe Champion before he joined the Liberation movement. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)

VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 11 DECEMBER 2016: "Poison" Ndevana, 58, is the president of the Musangwe Comittee in Venda, he is seen training his two eldest boys Mudshidzi, 15, and Nanjana, 13. Poison says his two eldest are still too young to train seriously but he sees them as future champions. The two boys fight at every Musangwe event and are fearless of their opponents. Musangwe is traditional bare knuckle boxing which occurs in Venda every Xmas period. Poison is a former Umkhonto Wi Sizwe ANC military wing fighter but he was already a Musangwe Champion before he joined the Liberation movement. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)

VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 11 DECEMBER 2016: Mudshidzi, 15, and Nanjana, 13 Ndevana, seen after a sparring session at their home in Venda. These two young fighters are the eldest sons of the president of the Musangwe comittee, Poison Ndevana. He says his two eldest are still too young to train seriously but he sees them as future champions. The two boys fight at every Musangwe event and are fearless of their opponents. Musangwe is traditional bare knuckle boxing which occurs in Venda every Xmas period. Poison is a former Umkhonto Wi Sizwe ANC military wing fighter but he was already a Musangwe Champion before he joined the Liberation movement. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)

VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 11 DECEMBER 2016: A Musangwe bare knuckle boxing trophy carved from wood sits on an ironing board inside the home of "Poison" Ndevana, 58. Poison is the president of the Musangwe Comittee in Venda. Musangwe is traditional bare knuckle boxing which occurs in Venda every Xmas period. Poison is a former Umkhonto Wi Sizwe ANC military wing fighter but he was already a Musangwe Champion before he joined the Liberation movement. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)

TSHIFIDI, VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 15 DECEMBER 2016: Men and boys of the Venda tribe challenge each other and fight bare knuckle over the festive period in South Africa. This is a tradition that dates back 200 years and began when herd boys tried to get their cattle bulls to fight with each other while they were being dipped for disease. The herd boys soon began to fight with each other and this became a tradition. The fighters may stop at any time and if a fighter starts bleeding the fight is stopped. It is seen a an outlet for the males in the community and nowadays there are champions on three different levels. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)

TSHIFIDI, VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 15 DECEMBER 2016: Men and boys of the Venda tribe challenge each other and fight bare knuckle over the festive period in South Africa. This is a tradition that dates back 200 years and began when herd boys tried to get their cattle bulls to fight with each other while they were being dipped for disease. The herd boys soon began to fight with each other and this became a tradition. The fighters may stop at any time and if a fighter starts bleeding the fight is stopped. It is seen a an outlet for the males in the community and nowadays there are champions on three different levels. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)

TSHIFIDI, VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 15 DECEMBER 2016: Men and boys of the Venda tribe challenge each other and fight bare knuckle over the festive period in South Africa. This is a tradition that dates back 200 years and began when herd boys tried to get their cattle bulls to fight with each other while they were being dipped for disease. The herd boys soon began to fight with each other and this became a tradition. The fighters may stop at any time and if a fighter starts bleeding the fight is stopped. It is seen a an outlet for the males in the community and nowadays there are champions on three different levels. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)

TSHIFIDI, VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 15 DECEMBER 2016: Men and boys of the Venda tribe challenge each other and fight bare knuckle over the festive period in South Africa. This is a tradition that dates back 200 years and began when herd boys tried to get their cattle bulls to fight with each other while they were being dipped for disease. The herd boys soon began to fight with each other and this became a tradition. The fighters may stop at any time and if a fighter starts bleeding the fight is stopped. It is seen a an outlet for the males in the community and nowadays there are champions on three different levels. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)

TSHIFIDI, VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 15 DECEMBER 2016: Men and boys of the Venda tribe challenge each other and fight bare knuckle over the festive period in South Africa. This is a tradition that dates back 200 years and began when herd boys tried to get their cattle bulls to fight with each other while they were being dipped for disease. The herd boys soon began to fight with each other and this became a tradition. The fighters may stop at any time and if a fighter starts bleeding the fight is stopped. It is seen a an outlet for the males in the community and nowadays there are champions on three different levels. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)

TSHIFIDI, VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 15 DECEMBER 2016: Men and boys of the Venda tribe challenge each other and fight bare knuckle over the festive period in South Africa. This is a tradition that dates back 200 years and began when herd boys tried to get their cattle bulls to fight with each other while they were being dipped for disease. The herd boys soon began to fight with each other and this became a tradition. The fighters may stop at any time and if a fighter starts bleeding the fight is stopped. It is seen a an outlet for the males in the community and nowadays there are champions on three different levels. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)

TSHIFIDI, VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 15 DECEMBER 2016: Men and boys of the Venda tribe challenge each other and fight bare knuckle over the festive period in South Africa. This is a tradition that dates back 200 years and began when herd boys tried to get their cattle bulls to fight with each other while they were being dipped for disease. The herd boys soon began to fight with each other and this became a tradition. The fighters may stop at any time and if a fighter starts bleeding the fight is stopped. It is seen a an outlet for the males in the community and nowadays there are champions on three different levels. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)

TSHIFIDI, VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 15 DECEMBER 2016: Men and boys of the Venda tribe challenge each other and fight bare knuckle over the festive period in South Africa. This is a tradition that dates back 200 years and began when herd boys tried to get their cattle bulls to fight with each other while they were being dipped for disease. The herd boys soon began to fight with each other and this became a tradition. The fighters may stop at any time and if a fighter starts bleeding the fight is stopped. It is seen a an outlet for the males in the community and nowadays there are champions on three different levels. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)

TSHIFIDI, VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 15 DECEMBER 2016: Men and boys of the Venda tribe challenge each other and fight bare knuckle over the festive period in South Africa. This is a tradition that dates back 200 years and began when herd boys tried to get their cattle bulls to fight with each other while they were being dipped for disease. The herd boys soon began to fight with each other and this became a tradition. The fighters may stop at any time and if a fighter starts bleeding the fight is stopped. It is seen a an outlet for the males in the community and nowadays there are champions on three different levels. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)

TSHIFIDI, VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 15 DECEMBER 2016: Men and boys of the Venda tribe challenge each other and fight bare knuckle over the festive period in South Africa. This is a tradition that dates back 200 years and began when herd boys tried to get their cattle bulls to fight with each other while they were being dipped for disease. The herd boys soon began to fight with each other and this became a tradition. The fighters may stop at any time and if a fighter starts bleeding the fight is stopped. It is seen a an outlet for the males in the community and nowadays there are champions on three different levels. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)

TSHIFIDI, VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 15 DECEMBER 2016: Men and boys of the Venda tribe challenge each other and fight bare knuckle over the festive period in South Africa. This is a tradition that dates back 200 years and began when herd boys tried to get their cattle bulls to fight with each other while they were being dipped for disease. The herd boys soon began to fight with each other and this became a tradition. The fighters may stop at any time and if a fighter starts bleeding the fight is stopped. It is seen a an outlet for the males in the community and nowadays there are champions on three different levels. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)

TSHIFIDI, VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 15 DECEMBER 2016: Men and boys of the Venda tribe challenge each other and fight bare knuckle over the festive period in South Africa. This is a tradition that dates back 200 years and began when herd boys tried to get their cattle bulls to fight with each other while they were being dipped for disease. The herd boys soon began to fight with each other and this became a tradition. The fighters may stop at any time and if a fighter starts bleeding the fight is stopped. It is seen a an outlet for the males in the community and nowadays there are champions on three different levels. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)

TSHIFIDI, VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 15 DECEMBER 2016: Men and boys of the Venda tribe challenge each other and fight bare knuckle over the festive period in South Africa. This is a tradition that dates back 200 years and began when herd boys tried to get their cattle bulls to fight with each other while they were being dipped for disease. The herd boys soon began to fight with each other and this became a tradition. The fighters may stop at any time and if a fighter starts bleeding the fight is stopped. It is seen a an outlet for the males in the community and nowadays there are champions on three different levels. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)

TSHIFIDI, VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 15 DECEMBER 2016: Men and boys of the Venda tribe challenge each other and fight bare knuckle over the festive period in South Africa. This is a tradition that dates back 200 years and began when herd boys tried to get their cattle bulls to fight with each other while they were being dipped for disease. The herd boys soon began to fight with each other and this became a tradition. The fighters may stop at any time and if a fighter starts bleeding the fight is stopped. It is seen a an outlet for the males in the community and nowadays there are champions on three different levels. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)

TSHIFIDI, VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 15 DECEMBER 2016: Men and boys of the Venda tribe challenge each other and fight bare knuckle over the festive period in South Africa. This is a tradition that dates back 200 years and began when herd boys tried to get their cattle bulls to fight with each other while they were being dipped for disease. The herd boys soon began to fight with each other and this became a tradition. The fighters may stop at any time and if a fighter starts bleeding the fight is stopped. It is seen a an outlet for the males in the community and nowadays there are champions on three different levels. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)

TSHIFIDI, VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 15 DECEMBER 2016: Men and boys of the Venda tribe challenge each other and fight bare knuckle over the festive period in South Africa. This is a tradition that dates back 200 years and began when herd boys tried to get their cattle bulls to fight with each other while they were being dipped for disease. The herd boys soon began to fight with each other and this became a tradition. The fighters may stop at any time and if a fighter starts bleeding the fight is stopped. It is seen a an outlet for the males in the community and nowadays there are champions on three different levels. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)

TSHIFIDI, VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 15 DECEMBER 2016: Men and boys of the Venda tribe challenge each other and fight bare knuckle over the festive period in South Africa. This is a tradition that dates back 200 years and began when herd boys tried to get their cattle bulls to fight with each other while they were being dipped for disease. The herd boys soon began to fight with each other and this became a tradition. The fighters may stop at any time and if a fighter starts bleeding the fight is stopped. It is seen a an outlet for the males in the community and nowadays there are champions on three different levels. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)

TSHIFIDI, VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 15 DECEMBER 2016: Men and boys of the Venda tribe challenge each other and fight bare knuckle over the festive period in South Africa. This is a tradition that dates back 200 years and began when herd boys tried to get their cattle bulls to fight with each other while they were being dipped for disease. The herd boys soon began to fight with each other and this became a tradition. The fighters may stop at any time and if a fighter starts bleeding the fight is stopped. It is seen a an outlet for the males in the community and nowadays there are champions on three different levels. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)

TSHIFIDI, VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 15 DECEMBER 2016: Men and boys of the Venda tribe challenge each other and fight bare knuckle over the festive period in South Africa. This is a tradition that dates back 200 years and began when herd boys tried to get their cattle bulls to fight with each other while they were being dipped for disease. The herd boys soon began to fight with each other and this became a tradition. The fighters may stop at any time and if a fighter starts bleeding the fight is stopped. It is seen a an outlet for the males in the community and nowadays there are champions on three different levels. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)

TSHIFIDI, VENDA, SOUTH AFRICA, 15 DECEMBER 2016: Men and boys of the Venda tribe challenge each other and fight bare knuckle over the festive period in South Africa. This is a tradition that dates back 200 years and began when herd boys tried to get their cattle bulls to fight with each other while they were being dipped for disease. The herd boys soon began to fight with each other and this became a tradition. The fighters may stop at any time and if a fighter starts bleeding the fight is stopped. It is seen a an outlet for the males in the community and nowadays there are champions on three different levels. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Verbatim for Le Figaro.)

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